9.3x57 At The Range Today

Discussion in 'Range Report' started by cottontop, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    I took my beautiful old 9.3x57 Husqvarna loaded with 286 grain Hornadys and 43 grains of 3031 powder. This is a very light rifle, less than 8 pounds with scope, and that load is pretty stout. Everytime I fired it, I spun around on the stool about 3 times, didn't know who I was for about 5 minutes, and when I woke up my nose was bleeding. Man that was fun.
    ct
     
  2. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    Wasn't that the Arctic survival rifle round of the Luftwaffe for Polar Bears? Orangello!?

    And Cottontop, did the recoil have any effect on you?

    :p
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2013

  3. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    I don't know, but it surely would work for that.
    ct
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    You've got that bad boy max'ed out. You should try 43gr of IMR4064. That should tame down the recoil a bit. They are very light rifles. Give Speer 270gr a try, that should save you a few $$ reloading. Same recipe.
     
  5. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    effect?


    I don't think the recoil had much effect on me other than thinking about the fear of possibly developing a flinch. Like the most interesting man in the world might say,"I don't often shoot the 9.3x57, but when I do, I brace myself for recoil."
    ct
     
  6. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    recoil


    Jim,
    I will try the 4064. I found that the Hawk bullet Co. in New Jersey offers lots of different bullet weights in 9.3, including a 200 grain RN. Ever tried any Hawk bullets in any of your 9.3's? Do you know if data is available for their bullets?
    ct
     
  7. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Cotton, I just enjoy shooting the old rifles of the past. My favorite hunting rifle is the Sharps 45-110-533. It is a "Gemmer" Sharps with a 6X 32 inch Malcome Scope. This is a light 13 lb. Sharps producing 1 1/2 tons at the muzzle. These rifles with a paper patch and a 20-1 lead 500 gr. bullet can take anything.:)
     
  8. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Never used Hawk. I did have a gentleman make me some GC Cast lead 285gr.
    Other then those it has just used common fodder. As for 200gr., I would shy away because of my experience w/ 232gr. They were not accurate and I had an occasional keyhole. Those were Norma cartridges.
     
  9. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    CZ still makes a 9.3 w Mannlicher stock but being a light rifle, I was worried about recoil. Looks like cotton top found the answer for me...:p

    Also comes in 6.5x55, 270 and .243. So maybe 6.5 or 243 ?
     
  10. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Recoil on the 9.3x57 is fairly mild. It is not the type of cartridge that loosens fillings. It is just a thumper down range. For average hunting Speer 270gr still cost under 20.00 for 50 bullets. You can load ammo for everything but thick skinned game for under .85 a round. With either the 285gr cast lead or 286gr partition, pretty much anything goes. I'd like to have a little more punch for great bear, so I'm still wanting a 9.3x62. Often a few hundred fps does not matter much, but in this case 500fps is a big deal going from 57 to 62mm.

    My 1943 Husqvarna
    [​IMG]

    My sons 1931 Husqvarna
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2013
  11. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    I hope everybody realizes I was exaggerating on the recoil thing. Yeah, the recoil is there, but really not that bad as jpattersonnh points out. If you can handle a .30-06, the 9.3x57 will be no problem. The Husky is such a light rifle that it makes the recoil feel worse than it really is. I have another Husqvarna in 8x57 and, depending on the load, it has some pretty good recoil also. But, I usually load fairly light. I'm going to back off a little on the powder and drop down to a lighter bullet and I'm sure the 9.3's recoil will be tame.
    ct
     
  12. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    Husky


    My 9.3x57 Husqvarna looks exactly like your 1943. Mine however has had an adjustable comb installed (by some previous owner) which was very nicely done. I'm glad it has this as by adjusting it up some, I am able to install some high mount scope rings (it was drilled and tapped for a scope before I got it) so that the bolt handle does not have to be altered for scope clearance. That bolt handle just looks too cool the way it is. I would hate to change it. However, I am going to replace the trigger as I don't like the 2 stage that is on it now. I replaced the triggers on two other Mausers I own and it has made a world of difference accuracy wise. And, I did the work myself; very easy to do.
    ct
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2013
  13. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    Well, I knew it was a 9.3 but didn't remember the length. No pipsqueek 57mm. No little 62mm. Try 9.3x74mmR.

    May the (air)force be with you! This was the Luftwaffe survival drilling with 12 ga. tubes.
     
  14. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    x57


    That all sound good, but I'll stick to the 9.3x57, however, a Drilling is usually pretty heavy and that would help to soak up some ot the recoil. The 9.3x57 is plenty for what I will use it for.
    ct
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The 9.3x74r was used for drillings for the most part, some doubles. It falls between the 9.3x57 and 9.3x62 as far as overall perfomance, but is exceptional. Rifles for this caliber are very high end. The case was a smaller diameter. It is .414 compared w/ .45. That effects volume and the way the powder burns.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
  16. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    I've usually only seen the 9.3X74 on drilling or older double rifles - doesn't not have the traditional "Stopping Power" of a double.

    The 9.3x62 - was a favorite conversion for German farmers in Africa. (One gun to defend both farm & family - where just about everything bites...

    No experience w x57 - should be ideal for deer, blk bear & hog etc.

    Sectional Density - Elmer's unsung hero
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  17. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    You have the game correct. You could add Elk, Moose, skunks if it is not your property. 9.3x57 is still carried by many guides in Africa as if the nasty game get up close, it has the ability to stop them. Not the best choice, but still effective. The x57 has 2544fpe+- at 50 yards w/ a 286gr, the x62 has 3632+- at 50 yards w/ the same bullet. At 150yards the x62 still has over 3000fpe.
    Talk about a hot rod caliber. If anyone thinks it in any way copied the 7.62x63 (.30-06) x62 came out in 1905. The Whelan came out in 1922, and was a "new" design. The .35 Whelan generates 3500fpe at the muzzle w/ a 250gr bullet.
     
  18. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    I'm was surprised the 35 Wheelan wasn't a commercial success. The 9.3 doesn't get the attention it deserves either. (In light, handy rifles no less)
     
  19. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Both have there following. The 9.3x62 is a legend in Africa.
    The .35 Whelan has 3148fpe at 50 yards w/ a 250gr and the 9.3x57 has 2670fpe w/ a 270gr at 50 yards. 2581fpe w/ a 286gr.

    I just found out why Norma may not work well, they are .364, not .366.

    The Whelan is a great cartridge, but most can't handle the recoil it produces as the rifles are standard and not designed to "roll" w/ recoil. People here in the states tend to look for a lower priced rifle, That is their mistake. The stock is as important as everything else.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013