8mm Mauser v .30-06

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by nhjon1980, May 11, 2014.

  1. nhjon1980

    nhjon1980 New Member

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    I have a 8mm Mauser and my wife has a .30-06. Which one is better for hunting big game like deer, bear, and moose?


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  2. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    6 of 1, half dozen of the other.....

    The 8mm carries a heavier bullet and greater energy. 30-06 is flatter shooting over the same distance. Both are capable of taking large game with the right bullet choices....
     

  3. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Agreed. The 8MM might do a tad better with heavier bullets than the 30-06 but I doubt you'd notice the difference in the field.
     
  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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  5. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    The .30-06 is the better cartridge !.....................
     
  6. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have had at least one rifle in 30-06 for over 35 years now, but i wouldn't turn down a rifle in 8mm Mauser if someone wanted to give me one!:D
     
  7. RaySendero

    RaySendero Member

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    8mm vs 30-06

    Hey Axxe, I've got both and use both hunting.
    There's really not that much difference if you reload the 8x57.
    (US made 8mm Mauser loads are way under-powered)

    A 180 grain 30-06 bullet and a 196 grain 8mm bullet have the same sectional density. Norma loads the 180 30-06 cartridge to 2,700 fps and loads the 196 grain 8x57 cartridge to 2,526 fps. Sellier/Bellot load a 180 30-06 cartridge to 2,670 fps and their 196 8x57 to 2,592.

    All these loads above go about 2,850 to 2,950 muzzle energy.



    To me its been more about the rifles than the cartridges.
    I like a 3x9 scoped 22" barrel 30-06 for general BG hunting. BUT
    I liked the two 8x57 below as a low powered or iron sighted hog rifle:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    All other things being approximately equal,

    the 30.06 is easier to find, here, in the states,

    in overall selection and quality,

    and much more popular to reload for.
     
  9. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Also ask what is your hunting environment? If it's open plains where you'll be taking 300-600 yard shots with a 30X scope, the flatter shooting .30-06 would probably be superior. If hunting in brush or may have to take a shot where the target is behind brush, the heavy bullet 8mm may handle so,e brush-crushing with less deflection. Temperature and barometric pressure may also affect one round over another if follow-up shots are a possibility. Each should be tested in real World conditions to determine if one is better in those conditions.
     
  10. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Greg, not to pick your post out, but for an example, I will. It does not matter the bullet weight. Hitting a branch, even a small one in any caliber is a disaster. 8x57 is the parent case of .30-06. The reason .30-06 has a larger case length is the U.S. Military, all the way back to when it was .30-03 Gov't did not have the technology in powders to use a shorter case to match the 57mm German case. I load 180gr Barnes, 175gr Sierra hunters .323 to 2700fps+. I doubt any game will know the difference between the 2 at a similar velocity, Same goes for a 180gr .30-06. 150gr .323(8x57) are running about 2900fps+-. The .30-06 is just so Vanilla. POI w/ a 100 yard zero at 200 yards is within .2" w/ a 180gr. Energy at 200 yards is within 28fpe. velocity 70fps.
     
  11. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    8mm Mauser, 30'06, 7.62*54r, .303 British. All are very similar as far as power. All are excellent for pretty much any medium or large game in North America. The '06 is probably a bit easier to find hunting ammo for.
     
  12. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    I think we need to take a look at the 8mm-06 !................
     
  13. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A lot of surplus 98's were converted to 8mm06/8mmx63. The 8mmx57 was hard to get and under powered in US loading's. 30-06 brass was plentiful and it was a simple chambering job. It was kind of in between the 30-06 and the 35 Whelan.
     
  14. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    from what i read in different articles in the past, this was very common in the late 1940's and 1950's due to the large number of surplus 8mm Mausers but lack of ammo for them. that many gunsmiths would ream the chambers to 8mm-06, because 30-06 cases were readily available.

    this why it's very important to have the chamber checked or measured by a competent gunsmith when buying some of the older Mausers because they could very well have been converted to another chambering and the 8mm-06 was a fairly common one at one time.
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    8mm-06 has a slight volume advantage then x57, but since it is all about pressure, there is no advantage. Both run a 175-180gr at the same velocity using identical powders. Big punch does not really change till you drastically change bullet and platform characteristics. The .35 Whelan w/ a 250gr bullet is a thumper. The 9.3x57 w/ a 286gr bullet is just behind it, but with very little felt recoil. 9.3x62 is a huge thumper. W/ a 286gr bullet it far surpasses the Whelan, but has been around for many years more.
    The Whelan w/ a Hornady 250gr at 2300fps produces 2397fpe at 100 yards
    The 9.3x57 w/ a 286gr hornady at 2100fps produces 2309fpe at 100 yards.
    9.3x62 at 2300fps w/ a 286gr produces 2800fpe at 100 yards. This cartridge maxes out at 2400fps, the extra recoil is not worth 100fpe at the end.
    Felt recoil between the .35 and .366(9.3x62) is about the same.
     
  16. tinbucket

    tinbucket Well-Known Member

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    It's your preferance. If in doubt buy one of each. The .30-06 is more common and ammo easier to obtain. If your out west or where long range is the probable shot, there is the .30-378 Wby and the Jarret version and several other wildcats. Some decry long shots but three hundred yards is not that far. Practice and being familiar with your choice makes the shots come easier. I never have figured out scopes, on .30-30s or on rifles in the woods or under 300 yards.
     
  17. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When you get old you will. I can still do OK with a receiver sight (peep) especially with a fiber optic front but open sights dont work very well for me anymore past pistol range. I do like the red dots as long as they are no larger than 3 moa.
     
  18. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    most definately! as your get past a certain age, your eyesight degrades. that's why most all of my rifles wear scopes now.
     
  19. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I spoke w/ my eye doctor this past year about my sight, and using open sights. Because of the focal ability of your eyes, it will become more difficult. I'm lucky I guess, no issue with irons yet.
     
  20. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I do have issues with my eyes. Luckily I have an eye doctor who hunts. I wear progressive (no line) bifocals. He made the transition area wider than normal. I do have to push my glasses up before I shoot but it works.