7.62

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by saviorslegacy, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    I have a Mosin Nagant and I plan on getting an AK-47 here soon. It is common knowledge that both are Russian and thus shoot a 7.62 round. The cartridge size is different but I believe that should only pertain to the amount of powder used and the of course, the brass. Correct me if I am wrong.
    Anyways, my father has the reloading press thingy, a smelting pot and other weird reloading gizmos that I have no idea what they are called, but no bullet molds. He is gonna get some molds for his AR-15, 1911 .45, Springfield and probably 9mm. I want the molds to be able to reload my Russian guns.
    So my question is, "Where can I get molds for my guns?"

    I will probably be getting a .357 Magnum mold as well. That probably shouldn't be to hard, should it?
     
  2. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    One is 7.62x39, the other is 7.62x54R.

    In the case of the 7.62x54R, it would probably be cheaper just to buy the surplus, the priming system is different, and it takes some skill to pull off. At least that's what the reloading guys tell me.
     

  3. jeepcreep927

    jeepcreep927 New Member

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    Both *should* have a bore diameter of .311 but you might want to slug them to be sure, especially the Mosin.
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    If the AK you are looking at is a 47, then it would be a .311(7.62x39). They usually use a 120..125gr bullet. AK74 is 5.54x39. The 91/30 and its family use 7.62x54r. Bullet weights start at 150gr w/ 175..180 shooting the best, I use .312 for lead. I'm not sure if you can shoot cast lead out of an AK. Because the velocity is kept around 2000fps w/ gas check bullets, I'm not sure it would cycle the rifle. For 7.62x54r I would also recommend Gas checks to avoid barrel leading. You also need the correct load data. Simply reducing the charge can be dangerous as it can produce severe pressure spikes. You need boxer primed brass as berdan requires special tools and primers.
     
  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    It's going to be a big no no to load cast bullets for the AR 15, and possibly the AK. The lead will eventually stop up the gas system and then require a dang good cleaning to get it going again. Cleaning leading from the gas system is a bugger if you've never done it.
     
  6. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    As cheap as Eastern Bloc surplus ammo is for the 7.62 x 54R, and as cheap as Wolf ammo for the AK is, why even comtemplate re-loading? I reload for over 20 different rifle and pistol calibers, but I have never even thought of doing so for my AK or my Mosin-Nagant.
     
  7. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    For the 7.62x54r there are benefits if you want to hunt. Or for just having fun!
    A 170gr GC Cast lead .312 is a ton of fun in 7.62x54r or .303. They also will take whitetail under 150 yards. 2000fps MV or 1760 at 100 yards is meat on the table.
     
  8. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    midwayusa.com is a great site for ordering molds. I do pour lead for the 7.62x39. I currently use a .309 150 grain bullet with a gas check. You need to check your bore diameter. I shoot an sks. I have had no problem shooting reloads. Some rifles damage brass when ejecting. If yours is one of those, don't waste you time or money. The brass is too expensive to waste. Midway will have anything you need. They also sell the brass if you can't find it locally.

    I pour lead for everything I shoot. I shoot once a week no matter how cold or wet it is. I have not bought a box of ommo for over a year. Even at $7 a box for Wolf 7.62 x 39 it is much cheaper to reload. Watch gun shows for equipment. It is also amazing what people will sell at a yard sale.

    I even resize and cut down 30-06 to 8mm mauser.
     
  9. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    To bad that hunting with a high powered rifle is banned here in Ohio. I plan on moving to Georgia and I hope that I can hunt with it there.
    BTW, since my gun is almost 70 years old, is it considered an antique?
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I use a bullet cast from a Lyman mold, sized to .311. 150 grain gas check, 26.7 grains of W-748 and cycles the action just fine on an AK or SKS. Shoots far better than Wolf at 100yds.

    That same bullet will work for the "X 54R". A 170 may be better though.

    Finding Boxer primed brass in either is the problem, more so in the X 54R.
     
  11. VitSports6

    VitSports6 New Member

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    I'm reloading for my Mosin Nagant I am using .311 sierra bullets(I slugged the barrel and noted a .312) So I'm fairly certain it will be a little more accurate than the mil-surplus .308's, I'm still working up the powder load, But hopefully I should be good to go in the next few days.
    I have the dies and everything needed for reloading for my AK accept for the brass.
    One nice thing about reloading for the Mosin is the need to thoroughly clean the rifle due to the Berdan primers, It gets a bit old to clean a rifle longer than you shoot it.

    EDIT...
    Just a note I forgot, I have brass for my Mosin from Winchester and PPU that I am reloading, Just so you don't think I'm reloading the mil-surplus steel.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
  12. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    Cool, I'll make sure to take a note of everything when it is said and done.

    Yeah, I have been told that reloading steel is the ultimate no-no.
    Why is it so bad anyways?
     
  13. VitSports6

    VitSports6 New Member

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    Steel doesn't reform like brass, I'm sure there could be other reasons, I'm fairly new at reloading.

    Here is a post I had on 7.62x54r.net

    Slugged the barrel.

    Down the way there is a guy that posts up what he measured the Sierra bullets.
    Good luck
     
  14. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Steel is really really hard on your dies. I use to reload 45 auto in steel cases. I a kept bending my decapper. It finally broke. I replaced it and stopped reloading steel.
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Surplus ammo, depending on the country of origin is from .3105 to .312 for com-blok ammo. Finnish 7.62x53r is normally .308.
    The Berdan primers are not the issue, the primer compound itself is. You can buy new berdan primed steel that is not corrosive, but again you can't reload it. All it takes to deal w/ corrosive ammo is some boiling water down the bore and the boltface, and the gas tube and piston on an AK. Then clean as you normally would.
     
  16. gandog56

    gandog56 New Member

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    Well, I use milsurp for plinking, but my reloads for accuracy. Remember you can tailor make ammo specifically for just your rifle if you reload.
     
  17. ctreser

    ctreser New Member

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    Sierra .311 174gr HPBT was my favorite bullet to use in my Russian Mosin Nagants, just a little expensive. My bores slugged from around .311 to .315. Then recently I came across some Hornady 174gr .312 HPBT from Graf and Sons. They shoot even better than the Sierra's in my larger bores and much cheaper.
     
  18. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Antique? No. A firearm is legally an antique if it (that particular gun, not just that model) was made prior to 1899. Muzzleloaders are considered antiques even if made this morning (except for the ones that do a presto-changeo to modern ammo) It is a "Curio & Relic" firearm, but not antique. Governed by Federal law.

    The rate of twist of rifling is set to stablize bullets of a given weight. Most AK bullets are about 123-125 gr. Most M-N bullets are MUCH heavier. What will stabilize one does not stabilize the other.

    Avoid cast bullets in gas operated autos. You will need gas checks on the M-N. Lee also makes decent molds. You will also need to size and lube the bullets after casting. Separate step in the manufacturing process. Also need harder lead (different alloy) than the pure lead used for muzzleloaders.
     
  19. res45

    res45 New Member

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    I reload for all my rifles and pistols including both my Chinese and Yugo SKS and Mosin M44. I use the same bullet shot as cast in both calibers a Lee 160 gr. gas check tumble lube RNFP of water quenched wheel weights that drop a .312.5. My powder of choice is Alliant 2400 it's neither capacity or position sensitive in rifle cartridges form 7.62 x 39 up to 30-06 and even slightly larger.

    I use a light load of 12.5 grs of 2400 in my SKS rifle for plinking and it cycles and dumps the brass right at my feet,if you want to go faster and duplicate the feel and throw your cases into the next county like commercial X39 ammo you can use a MAX load of 15.0 gr. I've put over a hundred rds, of cast loads through my SKS rifle with no lead buildup in the gas system.

    In my M44 in 54r I use 16.0 grs. even of 2400 which is the standard load for military type rifle. 16 grains of #2400 is the "universal" prescription. It gives around 1500 f.p.s. with a 150-180 grain cast bullet in almost any military caliber. You can also use Red Dot 13.0 grs. even is know as the LOAD,as a substitute if you don't have 2400 with 30-40 Krag, .303 British, 7.65 Argentine, .308 Win., 7.62x54R Russian, .30-06, 8x57 and .45-70. The Load
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2010