.44 Mag combo

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Tyrsgodi, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. Tyrsgodi

    Tyrsgodi Member

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    I have finally put together my one-caliber combo, a Puma 92 lever in .44 Mag, and a Ruger New Super Blackhawk to match. I'm thinking that 180 grain bullets make more sense than 240 for the combo. Any advice? :D
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    For hunting? Go with the 240.
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Competition or hunting? I load a 200 grain lead round nose for IDPA. I use a 240 XTP for hunting. That new Model Super Blackhawk can handle 300 grain XTP. But it is a serious handful. I tried those in mine. They would be good for hunting. But no fun at range at all.
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Depends on the rifle. A lot of lever guns are sensitive to cartridge overall length and bullet ogive design.

    240 is better for hunting than 180 and will liekly cycle more reliably in a levergun.
     
  5. Tyrsgodi

    Tyrsgodi Member

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    If I just set my LOA at the bench to the Lyman recommendation for the rifle, that should cover me, right?
     
  6. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    It would help if you answer the questions first?? I like others would try 240gr bullets or heavier. What are you wanting to use it for hunting , target shooting play time??
    Maybe bulk spft lead bullets will do fine . maybe hardcast or hp ??
     
  7. Yes, it 'should'.

    However, sometimes one must seat a lighter bullet 'out' further to get the proper length. That can then allow a 'looseness' in the case mouth fit and consequently either push bullets deeper or pull the bullet entirely spilling powder into the magazine and action.

    Using a light-for-caliber bullet (f'rinstance, 180 in a .44 mostanything) will give a muzzle velocity boost which seems 'enhancing'. However, with a lower sectional density, the bullet loses velocity quicker, resulting in lower downrange velocity, 'power' and greater bullet drop.

    A light-for-caliber bullet can lower recoil. But not much.

    None of this is to say one cannot use 180 bullets in .44 Magnum handguns or carbines. Just there's not much point.
     
  8. Tyrsgodi

    Tyrsgodi Member

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    Realistically, any hunting will be inside 100 yards. I got a good deal on PMC 180 solid flats, so I'm a bit heavy there. But I have reloaded .44 spec for years with 240 swc, and can continue there. Sounds like a good thing to do with the brass from the 180!