40MM ammo legal?

Discussion in 'Legal and Activism' started by clr8ter, Apr 1, 2014.

  1. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    I put this on E-Bay the other day. It's inert, no powder or explosive. Then I got a message from a guy in Australia who wanted to bid on it. I told him no, because of possible export/import restrictions. Then I checked where the highest bidder was from. Canada. So I told him the same thing, for the same reason. Now, that has me thinking; are there any restrictions HERE on something like this nowadays? I didn't even consider it before I put up the auction, as I bought it off the shelf in an army navy store 20 or so years ago. But a lot has changed in 20 years.

    Comments?
     

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  2. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    It's just an empty tube that looks like an artillery shell, so yes I'm sure the government doesn't want you to have it. :D I'm kidding it's probably ok but who knows, after all they are expelling kids from school for chewing their pop tarts into a gun shape.
     

  3. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Inert munitions with no propellent or explosives are legal in the states. Depends on foreign laws as to whether its legal ti export. Your wise to say no to foreign buyers as lots of countries make it illegal to posess such even in inert condition.

    I would send my kid to school with it for show and tell and paint on the casing "get over yourself..." Prolly good thing i dont have kids.:D
     
  4. Jamesaritchie

    Jamesaritchie New Member

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    In my state, at least, and in several others I've been in, 40mm ammunition is perfectly legal. It's having an explosive in it that's illegal. I've used 40mm several times, but the projectile was made out of milled aluminum.

    When it has a non-explosive projectile, it's no different than an oversize .22.
     
  5. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    Are you sure? Isn't there something about anything with a bore over .500" being considered a destructive device?

    Good news, though. The high Canadian bidder lives in SK, and has a ND USA address for me to ship to....if he wins.
     
  6. trigger643

    trigger643 New Member

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    Once an artillery munition has been rendered inert, at least here in the states, it's not restricted.

    I am not that familiar with other countries' laws concerning this matter. I know some treat them as we do (US and Canada, for example -- as I've bought them from there), but as for the rest of the world, I remain blissfully ignorant on this matter.