.40 S&W cost breakdowns?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by FatTire, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. FatTire

    FatTire New Member

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    Howdy, so im getting setup to do a lot (i want to build up about 5k rounds) of .40 S&W for my glock 22. im using a lee press and rcbs dies, and i know it will take some time. I was wondering if anyone had done a cost per round breakdown? ive penciled it out and come out at about $0.33. is that about right? or am i dicking up my math? price includes buying the brass, powder (power pistol is what i use now, perhaps theres a good but cheaper alternative?) primers (cci), and 180gr fmj bullets (sierra).

    This will be just for shooting, im looking to do a lot of defensive and tactical shooting cause it looks like a lot of fun. im not interested in competition shooting, so my thinking is i dont really need hyper accurate, just reliable and reasonably consistent. i could be wrong on that too?

    Thanks for any input!
     
  2. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    around here sierra bullets are more expensive than hornadys. there are lots of different powders that work. so just have to try a few and see what you like. those changes might help lower the cost. also why not try to trade for once fired brass on here or other websites instead of buying it new?
     

  3. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    This might help:

    http://ultimatereloader.com/tools/reloading-costs-calculator/

    You might want to take a second look at brass costs. Last time I bought brass, it was 60 for a 1000 once fired range pickups. This was to get things going. Since that time, range pickups have increased my supply as well. You will also need to account for the fact that brass is a multi-use item, and even if you bought NIB brass at full retail, it get cheaper every time it's used.
    I was also going to tell you to look at cast bullets, then I remembered the issue with Glocks. Get an aftermarket barrel and you can save a fair bit there as well. But only you can determine if it's worth it to you.
    Bulk orders of primers will save you money too.

    The attached pic is what I came up with:
    Powder: Unique Local price, 1 lb.
    Primers: CCI or federal, local retail prices, last time I looked.
    Bullets; Montana Gold 155 gr
    Brass, Bulk once fired last time I bought any.
    Cheaper than $.33per round. Still room for improvement though.
    Hope this helps.
     

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  4. FatTire

    FatTire New Member

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    Excellent! very helpful, thanks guys!
     
  5. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    If you are going to load "just shooting" ammo then buy a cheaper bullet. If you insist on jacketed bullets, getcha some Precision Delta or Zero Brand. Plated and lead are a cheaper alternative, but lead has been frowned upon in Glocks with factory barrels.

    Buy used brass, plenty of sites on-line that sell used 40 brass.

    Buy powder and primers in bulk from a place like Powder Valley. Even with the haz-mat you can save $$ if you purchase enough.
     
  6. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I'd like to second the cast bullets suggestion.

    Get an aftermarket barrel for it and you'll save a ton of money on bullets.

    http://www.snscasting.com/

    That's where I buy mine from. Good quality and they work very well in my M&P.

    You could also look into smelting your own bullets. I haven't started that yet but I plan on it. A lot if times you can get lead supplies for free.
     
  7. FatTire

    FatTire New Member

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    Good point on making bullets, I do have it in my head to do that eventually, so Im gonna consider moving a barrel up the priority list :)
     
  8. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I think I saw casting equipment on midway for relatively cheap. I have it in my head that you can get started for like 100 bucks.
     
  9. Crazycastor

    Crazycastor New Member

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    I use power pistol for reloading my .40. To me its great in the glock 22. If you haven't done so yet your going to need a bulge buster for your brass especially if you are buying once fired brass. Also since your just messing around shooting, I would keep the powder right at 7 grains to save on powder. One pound of powder will do about 800 bullets. Buy in bulk when you can and things get cheaper.
     
  10. armsmaster270

    armsmaster270 New Member

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    I got a 5 gallon bucket of once fired Remington nickel cases for free @ the sheriff's Range then loaded them with Gold Dots.
     
  11. FatTire

    FatTire New Member

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    Really appreciate all the tips fellas, ive only been reloading about a year, so all the tips really help. Im also looking at reloading 5.56, but ive been told its hard to build reliable rounds, anyone know if thats true, n if so why?
     
  12. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    I'd say that whoever told you that must have been doing it wrong. My first effort at .223 worked great. They fed and cycled fine in my AR and they easily cut group sizes nearly in half compared to PMC gold.
    Assuming one gets the process correct, .223 isn't that hard. If you've never worked with bottle neck cartridges, be sure to read the applicable section of your reloading manual. There are some differences but nothing difficult.
    The hardest part of reloading for .223/5.56 is consistently finding components.
     
  13. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    I got an aftermarket barrel to shoot lead. Another benefit is the Bass has less room to expand so it lasts longer being resized and fired over and over