4 and/or 8 gauge shells/hulls

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by rechapman03, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. rechapman03

    rechapman03 New Member

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    Does anyone have any idea if there are any 4 and/or 8 gauge shotgun shells/hulls for sale. I would like to have one of each to display. Any information would be much appreciated and thank you in advance.
     
  2. 1911love

    1911love New Member

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    I didn't even know they existed. 10 is the biggest I've ever seen or heard of. Hopefully someone has the 411 on this, I'd really like to know.
     

  3. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I've seen them at gun shows and cartridge shows. I have some loaded 8 gauge rounds.
     
  4. surplusaddict

    surplusaddict New Member

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    I have some vintage 8 gauge winchester leader grade paper shells from my great grandpas parker 0 grade 8 gauge, made in 1884. Ill have to take more pictures because they were destroyed when my phone went through the washer.
     
  5. 1911love

    1911love New Member

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    Does anyone make new manufacture 8 gauge shotguns and/or shells? Was there an advantage over 10 or 12 gauge?
     
  6. Cutlass327

    Cutlass327 New Member

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    A bigger bruise maybe?
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Keep checking gunbroker and auctionarms. They come up now and again- but pricey. Shipping is also steep.

    There is a modern smokeless plastic cased shell CALLED an 8, but it will be headstamped INDUSTRIAL- flat fronted lead slug, used to tap steel furnaces by shooting out a clay plug in the furnace. Some folks claim they are for blasting out slag.

    The HUNTING shot shells were all black powder loads (one ultra exotic exception in modern Euro weaponry). Since Federal game laws cut off at 10 g, do not know of anyone loading 8s or 4s. AND it can be very easy to wander across the line into the category of Destructive Devices if you cannot show a sporting use for a firearm.

    I have a couple of 8s, and a single 4 g (not for sale) in collection.

    Guns Misc 004.jpg

    The last 3 shells on lower right are 2 8s and a 4. For scale, the shells above them are 12s. Yes, that is a .50 BMG to the right of the 4 g.

    BTW, do not think a 6 g shell was ever marketed. There were 6 g shotguns, but they were muzzle loader Punt guns.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  8. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I would venture to say an 8 gauge would be a punt gun. It would take two men to handle it. I used to own a 10 ga BPS. With magnum loads you didn't shoot it very often. Even the 10 ga is BPS very rare. I actually got more for that gun than I paid for it new. I only had it for 5 years.
     
  9. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    That 4ga blows my mind. It's huge. Thanks for sharing. That thing would rip my arm off.
     
  10. twoolddogs

    twoolddogs New Member

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    W.H. Davenport Arms Company manufactured an eight gauge, single barrel Goose Gun in the period 1891-1901.

    Hopkins and Allen Arms Company marketed this gun from 1901 to 1909 after purchasing W.H. Davenport Arms Company in 1901.

    Crescent Fire Arms Company purchased W.H. Davenport Arms Company from Hopkins and Allen in 1909 and discontinued the eight gauge gun.
     
  11. 1911love

    1911love New Member

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    Good info C3 about DDs, I hadn't even thought about that ridiculous law. I guess a 4 or 8 gauge is not in the cards for my collection. May we have some more info regarding 10 gauges? Why are are they so rare and does anyone still make them and the shells?
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, back in the day, all shotshells were black powder. To throw a larger pattern of shot, and be able to hit at greater ranges (with enuff pellets to drop birds) big was better.

    Then along came smokeless powder. And the 3 inch magnum 12 g throws as much shot- harder and faster- than the old BP 10 g. from a smaller, lighter gun.

    Is the 10 still around? Yes- goes up to 3 1/2 inch magnums. Mainly goose hunters- steel shot is bulkier, so the greater volume of the 10 g case actually does some good. Just not real common.

    FWIW, I have at least one each of 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 28, 32, .44 XL, .410, 9mm, 7mm, 6mm shotshells. That is, made FOR a shotgun- not a shot load for rifle or pistol. There was also a 15 g and an 18 g- both scarcer than all get out.

    But some had better marketing than others.......
     
  13. 1911love

    1911love New Member

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    .44XL, 9mm, 7mm, 6mm????? I have never heard of these. Please elaborate when you have time. Thanks C3!
     
  14. rechapman03

    rechapman03 New Member

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    C3, do you have any idea where I might get one 4 gauge shotgun shell?
     
  15. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Alas, know of no immediate source for 4 g shells. Auctionarms has a few sellers with a variety of collectable cartridges- but those are uncommon.

    44XL is the 44 Extra long- metal rifle cartridge, paper bullet filled w/ shot. Ancestor of the .410 shotgun. 9, 7, and 6mm are rimfire shotshells. Metal head, paper body.

    shotshells.jpg

    Left to right- 6mm, 7mm, 9mm single charge, 9mm double charge, .410 2 1/2 inch
     
  16. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    No 20 ga? :D :p

    Cool! What were the 6mm, 7mm, and 9mms used for? Were they basically the equivalent of today's rat shot?
     
  17. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Sorry- yes, I have assorted 20s.

    Yes, the 6/7 mm shotguns were "garden guns". Used to chase bunnies out of you garden without shooting up neighbor's house across the alley.

    Pinfires- early adventure into complete cartridges. Each round had it's own firing pin, resting on an internal primer. Falling down while wearing a bandolier of those could be...... interesting.

    The really scarce shells were factory hi pressure test loads- "proof" loads. They did not like to let those get out the door. There are also low brass, high brass, all brass and no brass shells. Even have a couple of all aluminum
    shotshells.

    There is an incredible variety for the collector in the humble shotgun shell.
     
  18. steadyshot

    steadyshot New Member

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    Back some 30 years ago when I was a kid, I attended an VFW picnic/BBQ. I remember it very well because on that day they were firing a Salute Cannon.

    The cannon fired all brass blank shells that looked to be around 4 to 6 gauge in size. They fired the cannon at least a dozen times or more. They would put the shells on a table to cool after each shot. I remember wanting one of those shells, but it was not to be.

    At the end of the day, each one of the shells given to members of the VFW.
     
  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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