3D printing a 22lr pepperbox revolver.

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by Dylan Pendlebury, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. Dylan Pendlebury

    Dylan Pendlebury New Member

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    Hello, I am new to this forum. I'm currently 3D printing a double action 8 round 22lr pepperbox revolver and thought that some people on here might be interested in the process. I'm looking for a range near Jacksonville FL that would be interested in allowing me to shoot it, so if anyone has any connections, that would be very appreciated. I own a 22 riffle and a Cobra .380 and do shoot them often, but engineering and 3D printing is really more my thing.
    I will post photos as the parts come out..
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Dylan- just a note- I do not know of a 3D printing process that will print a rifled barrel. If you print a smoothbore pistol, even in .22 caliber, you will have committed a serious Federal Felony- making an Any Other Weapon- unless you have first applied to the BATF and paid a $200 tax (and gotten their approval) A smoothbore firearm that has barrels less than 18"/ overall length of less than 26" is a National Firearms Act weapon, and in the same general category as a machinegun. Penalty is 10 years in Federal prison, fine of $10,000, lifetime loss of right to possess any firearm.
     
    towboater likes this.

  3. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Yep, know the laws.
     
  4. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    Wrong !...............Better do some research.............
     
  5. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Tom-
    C3 is absolutely correct.
    You are the one who is wrong.
     
  6. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I wouldn't want to be anywhere near you when you pull the trigger.
     
    AZdave likes this.
  7. AmPaTerry

    AmPaTerry Forum Chaplain Lifetime Supporter

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    I am wiling to bet that rifled barrels could be 3D printed -
     
  8. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They could but it would be gone after a few rounds.
     
    AZdave likes this.
  9. Mongo

    Mongo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Question: How are people able to buy an 80% lower, assemble an AR 15 and then keep and bare it legally? Are they legal or not? I'm looking for an opinion, not trying to trap anyone.
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Mongo, it is perfectly legal to MAKE a firearm. However, if you want to make a sawed off shotgun, there is some paperwork you need to do first unless you want a new roommate named Bubba.

    In the case of taking an 80% receiver, and building it into a rifle (or a pistol) that's fine- as long as a stocked gun has a rifled barrel at least 16 inches, or a smoothbore barrel at least 18 inches. A handgun may not have a smoothbore barrel if less than 18 inches.

    Yes, you are thinking of the various .410 revolvers- they have rifled barrels.
    PS- the legal term for a smoothbored pistol under the 1934 NFA is an Any Other Weapon.
     
  11. AZdave

    AZdave Well-Known Member

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    This is a nation of laws. Too many laws.

    There is a law that requires a certain amount or percentage of metal to make a 3D printed weapon detectable.

    Also I think certain weapons like muskets or black powder pistols have different laws. There is a long gun musket that has an integral silencer that is legal, but doesn't require a tax stamp because batf doesn't classify it as a firearm.

    Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer so this advice is worth almost nothing. YMMV
     
    schnuffleupagus likes this.
  12. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    Dylan,

    try a public range....

    http://myfwc.com/hunting/safety-education/shooting-ranges/

    I recommend a weekday, it will be less busy.
     
  13. regload

    regload Active Member

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    And, make very sure ahead of time that your last will and testament is up-to-date.
     
  14. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    IIRC, that can be done for your own use and NOT for sale.
     
  15. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can not make a gun to sell.
    You can sell a gun that you made.
    Aren't laws fun?
     
    AZdave likes this.
  16. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The truth of the matter is that people don't have to obey any of the, too many, laws that they don't agree with. It is a choice people make every day; the prisons are full of such folks. We lock up more people than any other nation of the face of the earth, one more isn't going to jam the system up.

    Black powder pieces are not considered "weapons" unless they are used in committing a crime, that is why they have different statutes from "firearms." The laws don't have to make sense to anyone but the prosecutors and the judge.
     
  17. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And, over-all-length must be at least 26-inches.
    Several years ago I bought a few Caspian 1911 receivers and built up a couple of pistols. During a compliance check, the agent told me that I was manufacturing and would need to apply for a manufacturers license if I was to continue building these pistols and "selling" same. The quirk in all of that is, according to this agent that, "if a person other than me, were to bring in a 1911 style receiver that he/she bought and I built it up into a custom pistol, that would be an OK process".
    Now, whether that compliance agent was correct with his assessment, or not, I was NOT willing to apply for a manufacturing license at $1,000.00 for only a couple of 1911 builds per year.
    Each and every time I get my FFL renewed another, updated book of rules and regs comes along. The first book I received in 1969 was around ½ inch thick. It will be interesting to see how thick the current volume is when it arrives shortly after my current renewal.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  18. AZdave

    AZdave Well-Known Member

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    Ahh 69 was a good year. Got out of hs. Entered the service. Watched the man walk on the moon.

    I would guess the book has at least doubled. With the rule of 10's should be about 2.5 inches now.:eek: