380.

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by SingleLiberty24, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    My grandfather has a 380. And I want to shoot it so is there anything I need to know about it like how it kicks or anything else
     
  2. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Most .380s are small guns. They usually are a little snappy. Mostly remember not to put your thumb behind the slide.

    Have you had any safety training yet?
     

  3. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    Hunter Education and that's just about it
     
  4. roscoguy

    roscoguy New Member

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    What Rick said ^. Some are worse than others though. I've shot a S&W BG380 & a Kahr P380, both were easy to shoot - even one-handed.
    What make/model is it?
     
  5. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    I have no clue what it is
     
  6. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    I have no clue what it is
     
  7. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    Don't worry my 10 year old grandson shoots my 45 acp and 45 colt. You'll be ok with the recoil.
     
  8. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    Ok then Thanks for the info
     
  9. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    Ok Thanks for all the info
     
  10. gollygee

    gollygee New Member

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    The recoil shouldn't be bad at all, unless it's a really small 'mouse gun' of some sort. Just to be completely safe, you might just load one round in the mag, chamber it & shoot it, to see just how it is. That way, if you are surprised with more recoil than expected, there is not a second round in the pistol that you accidently discharge by reflex. Some pistols, if decocked, are double action on the first round & single action on the second. That second round can go off really easy!
     
  11. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    Ok then thank you for all the info
     
  12. HAFBSP

    HAFBSP New Member

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    A 380 is just a shortened 9mm round. If you have any experience with 9mm you will find the 380 to have far less kick than even what little the 9mm produces. 380 is also called a 9mm short.
     
  13. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Hi SingleLiberty24,

    Welcome to FTF.

    The 380 is going to probably give you more muzzle flip/blast than

    actual recoil, due to the gun size and barrel length.

    It shouldn't be anything you can't handle, with a firm grip.

    Be sure to keep your thumb down, and the crook

    of your hand between the forefinger and thumb below the

    beavertail, to avoid a nasty cut from the slide.
     
  14. SingleLiberty24

    SingleLiberty24 New Member

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    Thank you for the advise I'll try it
     
  15. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    Good! Now go do your homework! :D
     
  16. Hurryin' Hoosier

    Hurryin' Hoosier New Member

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    If I recall correctly, the 9MM Luger (9MM Parabellum) is actually a lengthened version of the 9MM Browning (9MM Short, 9MM Kurz, 9MM Corto, 9MM Scurt, .380 ACP), no?
     
  17. Hurryin' Hoosier

    Hurryin' Hoosier New Member

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    One word of advice: If the gun in question is a Walther PPK or PPK/S, be very careful how you grip it. If you get your strong hand a tad too high, you'll wind up with a nice little slice on your hand between your thumb and trigger finger. (I have a scar to prove it! :eek: )
     
  18. HAFBSP

    HAFBSP New Member

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    The .380 is 9x17mm versus the 9mm Luger at 9x19mm. So in comparison the .380 is shorter than the 9mm Luger in both bullet and cartridge. The Luger came out in 1902 and the .380 in 1908. So specificity speaking the .380 is a shortened version of the 9mm Luger since it was introduced after. Now I don't know if Browning specificity had Luger's design in mind when he made his .380 round, but it would have definitely been available to him.

    The .380 was designed to be a self-defense round versus the 9mm Luger that was created specificity for military applications. Both were designed to be used in a blow back systems so its logical to assume that Browning did base his .380 ACP on the 9mm Luger.

    Also the 9mm Luger was designed to be a more powerful round than Luger's previous design the 7.65 Luger at 7.65 x 21mm
     
  19. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The 9mm Luger (parabellum) is a high pressure round that shares little with the .380. Yes bullet diameter are the same, normal bullet weights are different. .380 - 90 gr and 9mm 115-147 gr.

    The 9mm is unsuited to blowback pistols as the spring tension and slide mass must be sufficient to contain the pressure. Most 9mm pistols are locked breech designs. SMG's are blowback because much heavier bolts are possible in those larger designs.

    The cases are very different. The .380 is a straight walled case with a smaller base than the 9mm. The 9mm has a pronounced taper.
     
  20. RNstanger

    RNstanger New Member

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    I had a Bersa Thunder in 380 once and it reminded me of a 22 shooting Stingers out of it. Very controllable