.380 Bersa Thunder

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by njjohnson, Mar 12, 2010.

  1. njjohnson

    njjohnson New Member

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    I am interested in getting a small frame semi-auto for a carry weapon and have been drawn to the Bersa Thunder in .380. Has anyone had any experience with this gun and if so what are the pros and cons? Also, is a .38 the same round as a .380?
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    got a thunder and thunder plus. excellent guns very accurate for their size on par with walther PPK/s, sig, ruger 380's for a cheaper price.

    cons: needs a 500round+ break in to be reliable. pricey magazines which can be hard to get. long turn around if it needs warranty work or parts.

    Pros: cheap for the quality of gun you get. very accurate. very reliable after break in. lightweight. easy to get back on target for follow up shots.

    380 acp or 380 automatic is not the same as 38 special. bullet diameter is the same .380=.38=9mm.
     

  3. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Whoa, whoa, whoa! Before you start purchasing any firearms, I would suggest you do a little more reading. No, the .38 is not the same as the .380. The .357 Sig is not the same as the .357 Magnum. A Smith and Wesson .38revolver is not necessarily the same thing as a revolver chambered in .38 Smith and Wesson Special, etc. There are many questions that you need to have answered. A lot of those questions you don't even know you have yet.

    You have got some studying to do, mister.

    I suggest you peruse some of the older threads here that can help with your edumacation.

    I am not trying to be a jerk, but firearms are serious business and knowledge is a good thing.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Not quite.

    The .380 has a .355 bore and uses .356 bullets
    The 9mm uses the same sizes
    The .38 Auto or ACP is .355 (sometimes .356)
    The .38 Super Auto is .355
    The .38 Special has a bore diameter of .357 and uses .358 bullet
    The .357 Magnum is truly .357
    The .357 Sig is actually .355 bored
    The .40 S&W has a bore diameter of .400
    The 10mm has a bore diameter of .400
    The .44 Magnum has a bore diameter of .429

    The list goes on and on. Some calibers have historical reasons for the name. Some have marketing reasons for the name (.357 Sig)

    The only way to really know what is what is to memorize all the calibers. When you can spout them off the top of your head, you are probably a gun nut.
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If you want to look at the calibers in the .355 bore, the list is pretty daunting:
    .380 ACP (AKA 9 X 17)
    9 X 18 Ultra
    .38 Auto
    .38 Super Auto
    .38 Super Comp
    .38 TJ
    9mm Luger (AKA 9mm Parabellum, 9X19)
    .356 TSW
    9 X 21
    9 X 23
    9 X 25
    9mm Largo
    9mm Bergman-Bayard
    .357 Sig

    The 9 X 18 Makarov should not be considered in this grouping because it uses a .363-.365 bullet.

    I'm sure I missed one or two, but you get the idea.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
  6. njjohnson

    njjohnson New Member

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    Not to start any arguments here but I'm going to go ahead and disagree with your logic. I do understand that there are many, many differences with closely related ammunition, however, if I waited around to buy another firearm until I learned all the various caliber compatibilities and imcompatibilities, muzzle energies and velocities, trajectories, ballistic coefficients, etc., I would never own another gun for as long I live. I enjoy shooting very much, and will never be able to handle any gun appropriately by doing only research and reading. I will agree that it is important to learn as much as one can when it comes to munitions if it is something they are planning on being a part of for a significant amount of time, especially if one is going to be teaching their kids about guns and shooting. I do consider myself to be a novice when it comes to all the ins and outs of all the different calibers, but I do know that if I buy a weapon that is chambered in plain old .380 then I know for a fact that I can safely buy and shoot plain old .380 ammo through that particular weapon. I know that 9x19 is not the same as 9x18 (Makarov), not all guns are built to handle high pressure loads, you can shoot .38 wadcutters through a Dan Wesson .357 magnum. I'm obviously not an expert or I would not have asked the question, but also, I wasn't just introduced to firearms yesterday. I asked because I didn't know, and that's one of the reasons I joined this forum- where I could ask questions in a safe environment without being made to feel inadequate. I do appreciate your fondness for knowledge and willingness to offer advice to newcomers. :cool:
     
  7. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    apparently you arent a reloader. They are not the same.
     
  8. njjohnson

    njjohnson New Member

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    No no, not a reloader. Maybe in the future though; I like the idea of it.
     
  9. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    I agree that you don't need to have every caliber/diameter knowledge there is, BUT you shouldn't post things as facts that aren't either.

    :rolleyes:
     
  10. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have a bersa thunder concealed. It is a 380 with an 8 round mag. That's 9 if you carry one in the chamber. I like mine a lot. But that doesn't mean you will. What are you planning on using it for? Concealed carry, Shooting tin cans at the range, home protection, competition? Different guns are for different purposes. Perhaps if you could give us a little more info we could offer a little more of the same. We are all happy to help with advice. But, just remember, you will have to live with your purchase. Even at the $260 price I paid for my Bersa, I thought about it for a while before I bought it.

    Sorry . Just realized you said carry gun. I only have the bersa for when I must be very discrete. I carry a Sigma in 40 or a 1911 in 45 when I am able. I am not impressed with the performace of the 38 special cartridge when shot out of a 2 inch barrel.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
  11. njjohnson

    njjohnson New Member

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    I didn't think I posted anything as fact except for the "plain old .380" line?
     
  12. njjohnson

    njjohnson New Member

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    No sweat. I'm no expert, but it seems as though not much of anything can be very accurate out of a two inch barrel- but I could be wrong. :)
     
  13. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I was actually refering to the lack of velocity. A lot of people don't realize that a bullet needs a certain length of barrel to reach certain speeds. A 38 special bullet leaves a six inch barrel much faster that a 2 inch barrel. You may be aware of this...but I am sure there are people reading that don't.
     
  14. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have a 2 inch 38 that I can keep in the black at 15 yards. But that doesn't mean it would stop someone from attacking me. The limit to 5 rounds is a draw back too.
     
  15. njjohnson

    njjohnson New Member

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    Actually, I was thinking the length of the barrel, with the rifling, was for flight stability of the projectile. I did not know barrel length affected the velocity- but now I do. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010