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I find that a chronograph is critical when trying to achieve a certain load combination.
However I find it odd that Unique doesn't have a recipe for what you want to do.
Change your bullet size or change powder if you are unsure.
I'm shooting some test loads tomorrow morning using five other powders at several different charge weights and two different bullet weights, twenty rounds per sequence (a bit more than 350 rounds). I have narrowed down the loads pretty closely to the accuracy and velocities that I would like, with accuracy being my first priority then velocity. If the accuracy is okay, but the velocity isn't then I stop testing that powder. Unique (the previous base), AutoComp, TrueBlue, N340, Bullseye, and CFE Pistol are what is being tested tomorrow with Hornady 125g and 158g XTP bullets. Reloading is my only hobby. I only shoot (these days) in order to test the loads I'm currently interested in. I always test through a chronograph. Without the chrono I would feel that I am just wasting my time. These two XTP bullet weights are what I have been able to find easily and at a reasonable price. I shoot Hornady XTPs frequently (almost exclusively actually) in 40S&W, 9mm, 10mm, 45 ACP, and (in the future I think) in .38 Special. I have also tried bullets from Nosler, Speer, Fort Scott, Sierra, Berger, Berry's, and Lehigh Defense, but for the price and consistency of performance I have mostly settled on the Hornady XTPs. I do occasionally purchase a couple of boxes of other brands (when I see some) to experiment with but those others haven't really pleased me in one way or another over the years.
 

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Aren’t XTP’s expensive for practice loads ? I’m usually slinging lead for practice. Not that I’m a cheapskate or something but I guess I am.
For sure. Once i work up a SD load with the xtp i load what i need and dont shoot them. I will usually work up a range load with same weight bullet and velocity.

ETA: Although... recently i purchased .357 @ 21$, 10mm @ 23$ and .451 @ 25$ per 100 at CAL Ranch.
 

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My Ruger Blackhawk hits point of aim with almost any ammo I can conjure up but the sp 101 is a little fussy. The sp is my bedside defense weapon so I’m not worried about long shots. I load xtp and other rounds but my personal favorite defense round is made of lead. 180 grain SWC with aa5 . It pains my wrist to shoot it but if someone breaks into my house that’s what they will see. Unless I grab the 45 1911 aside of that one . Do I seem paranoid .
 

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After reloading 38s 357s and max for 30+ and shooting them into duct seal blocks as my gauge for penetration and expansion I,for the last 10 yrs buy Lehigh for the s&w 442 and anything else for cow can’t duplicate for defense but not target use.
Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Ammunition
 

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I think what he's trying to say in laymans terms, is that lighter bullet loads usually use more powder than heavier bullet loads, because heavier bullets always sit deeper in the case, and require less powder to create the same pressure as the lighter bullet load.

So you really have to be careful with experimentation, because loading a lighter bullet's powder charge into a heavier bullet load will spike the pressure, and on the opposite note, loading a heavier bullet's powder charge into a lighter bullet load could decrease the pressure and potentially cause a squib in extreme situations.

That being said, I don't personally think that in your case those 5 grains between 125 and 130 will really make a difference if loaded with 125gr data, other than you might actually be making +P's, but you still need to be really careful.
What is hard to understand: you can always use load data for a heavier bullet.
Heavier bullets have more inertia before they start to move, so a given amount of powder with a heavier bullet will have more time for pressure to build before the bullet starts to move. This is totally independent of seating depth, which can add to pressure buildup.
 

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My Ruger Blackhawk hits point of aim with almost any ammo I can conjure up but the sp 101 is a little fussy. The sp is my bedside defense weapon so I’m not worried about long shots. I load xtp and other rounds but my personal favorite defense round is made of lead. 180 grain SWC with aa5 . It pains my wrist to shoot it but if someone breaks into my house that’s what they will see. Unless I grab the 45 1911 aside of that one . Do I seem paranoid .
If you're paranoid, so am I. It would take me too long to decide which weapon to pick up in an "incident". My abodes are not good ones to break into. I'm short on mercy too..... My home is my castle. My body guard is me. 😁 Sadly, my wife is not a "gun person" and not meant to carry and won't carry so that's not something I push on her. She does approve of me buying gun stuff and protecting her though so it all works out except when she's alone. It is what it is....
 

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What is hard to understand: you can always use load data for a heavier bullet.
Heavier bullets have more inertia before they start to move, so a given amount of powder with a heavier bullet will have more time for pressure to build before the bullet starts to move. This is totally independent of seating depth, which can add to pressure buildup.

You are both right.

Same bullet used, seating deeper means less internal volume and higher pressure.
Heavier bullet means it is longer. Seated to same overall length, bullet will be seated deeper.

Using data for a heavy bullet, when loading a lighter bullets, means it is not seated as deep, therefore pressures will be lower.

One caveat, heavy bullet loads will use slower powders to get a slower pressure rise and overcome bullet inertia. Some of these powders do not like light bullets or light loads.
 

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1, Our good friend Mr. Foley resides in Great Britain. Different laws and regulations.

2. This thread dealt with a question asked in 2016. Please wind your calendars.
 

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Why would you hand anything in for destruction? Why would you hand anything in? Just the thought is repugnant to me. Put it in a shadow box and hang it on the wall, use it as a toothpick holder, anything but "turning it in".
Here in mainland UK, that is to say, England, Scotland and Wales, but not Northern Ireland, every legally-owned handgun had to be handed in back in 1997 - a total of just over 104,000. Not many, but then, there were not many of us who shot handguns - just 55,000 or so.

We were allowed to keep them if they had been deactivated to the then-standard, as a number of mine were - this was one of them. Since that time, the deactivation rules have changed twice, and my old guns COULD be modified to the new spec, but at a cost of around $250, each. They can NOT be sold or even given away to a third person, but CAN be handed in to a police station for destruction, or at an RFD/FFL for destruction. The first option is free, the second is not.

So no, I'm not handing it in - I'm keeping it as I've kept many of the others, as a reminder of what liars politicians can be.
 
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