36 vs 40 grain?

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by kaido, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Seen a pack and not to sure wether it was 40 or 60, but the latter seems to high.

    But I was just wondering how the heavier weight would effect the accuracy and what the drop would be like?


    edit . For .22 LR
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
  2. xXtacticalrimfireXx

    xXtacticalrimfireXx New Member

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    Like about 7.7" drop at hundred yards sighted at fifty

    (remington scoremaster a.k.a "squirrelmaster")
     

  3. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    That's not to bad at all. I figured it would of been a lot more of a drop.
     
  4. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla New Member

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    Wasn't sure std 22 rifling would stabilize 60 gr projectile. Glad to hear it does !
     
  5. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The thread title said 36 and 40 but the post is 40 and 60. Some guns will stabilize the 60 grn subsonic and some wont.
     
  6. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Reason it says 40 is because I'm not sure wether it was a 40gr or a 60gr that I seen. Just 60gr seems a little big for a .22LR round.
     
  7. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    If you want very quite for game .use one of the 740 fps and under shorts,cb or longs and a long barreled bolt rifle. 60gr will typicaly not be very accruate from a standard 1-16 twist barrel but do offer go penatration . The easy difference between 36 & 40 gr bullets is extra fps with no other changes. Your most accurate will be from the 1100 to 1000fps Ammo group. Most will say match ot target on the label and some are still cost affective to buy. All about what you are looking for the ammo to do.
     
  8. MidnightExpress

    MidnightExpress New Member

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    If you're asking about the Aguila SSS 60gr sub-sonics, I got about 6" of drop at 25 yards and they tumbled out of the barrel. This ammunition is also very dirty, my Marlin 60 didn't like it at all. My rifle was zeroed at 25yds for the 36gr - 1280 High Velocity rounds on the day I was testing the SSS and some other ammo. In the real world you can expect drop to be between 8" - 15" (maybe more) at 100yds when zeroed at 50 if it can fly straight. My ballistics software is indicating 10.92" drop at 100yds with a 50yd zero and velocity of 850fps.

    The muzzle velocity is published at 950fps for Aguila SSS, but the few chronograph results I've found are closer to 850 out of a 20" barrel and about 750 with an 18" barrel.

    Yes, 60gr is high for a 22lr but it's out there and you may have seen correctly. Do you remember the brand of ammo?
     
  9. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Well, after hearing about the lack of range/power behind the 60grn it makes me glad I stick with my 32grns instead.

    I'm not to sure what the brand was. Since my Walmart only seem to sell a few it was either Winchester, Federal or Remington. But don't hold me to that as I'm not tottaly sure yet, might check next time im in the store.
     
  10. Bigdog57

    Bigdog57 New Member

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    The 60gr. Aguila SSS is an excellent small critter thumper at fairly close range. Up close, tumbling/keyholing isn't a problem - just makes a bigger hole.
    Noise is lower than a high velocity .22LR (no ear-splitting 'CRACK!'), but NOT as quiet as Aguila Super Colibri or CCI CB rounds,
    I find the SSS to be more accurate in older .22 rfles, especially bolt actions. My Romanian M69 and older Marlins do well with it. My Whitney Wolverine pistol loves it.
    One problem with semiautos, is the .22Short case can cause ejection problems.

    It's definitely a 'niche' round - if you don't need that particular niche, it will be pretty much useless to you.