.357 Rifle

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by film495, May 17, 2019.

  1. film495

    film495 Active Member

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    Was thinking of getting a Winchester model 94 or something similar chambered in .357 so, I could shoot targets with .38 since it is cheaper. Couple questions -

    1. What would .357 be comparable to out of a rifle? Somewhere between 30-30 and 30-06? and if it shot .38 how much umpf does that have out of a rifle? Would you hunt deer with that?

    2. Does it really make sense to try to consolidate around ammo type? I already have .38, 30-30, 30-06, .22 so - I'd just be adding another caliber, but then could just focus on adding things that are .357 or .38 and collecting ammo for them.

    3. If you were going to get a carbine to shoot .357 and .38 which one would you go for?

    4. Am I going in the wrong direction and should I just pick up an AR?
     
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  2. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It all depends on your interest if you want a lever gun or not, they can be fun and useful.

    357 will be less powerful than 30:30 and certainly less than 30:06. You could hunt deer with 357, but not 38 spl.

    But 38 would less expensive plinking ammo.
     

  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A .357 carbine would be FAR less powerful than A .30-30.

    But still useful. With .38 special it would be awesome for small game and predators.

    Winchester, Henry, Marlin etc make very nice little carbines. I prefer the Winchester, but remember that I'm a Winchester "fanboy.":D
     
  4. film495

    film495 Active Member

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    any thoughts on the Winchester model 92 vs. 94 to shoot .38? I don't think I would even shoot .357 through it. I already have a 30-30, so - just looking for fun and shooting economy, and I can then use the .38 ammo in a piston and rifle. I can practice with that stuff and use the other for special occasions.
     
  5. Dakota1

    Dakota1 Well-Known Member

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    I don't hunt, but I handload 357 & a loading manual had separate data for 357 Mag out of a rifle. The text said, "Firing 357 Magnum out of a rifle puts it comfortably in the deer class."
     
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  6. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

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    .357 Magnum is a great round for a handgun.. and powerful enough I'd call it serviceable even for a rifle application... but it does have its roots as a handgun round so still it will be outperformed by most rifle calibers ( some of which are cheaper to buy)

    And its not cheap..
    Even though u can practice with 38SPC, which is a cheaper its still significantly more than a 9mm.

    If you want to go the route of doing handgun ammo in a long gun why not one of the many excellent ( and affordable) 9mm carbines on the market today?
    They are magazine fed and will also double as great defensive carbines in many situations..
    Yes it may mean another caliber for you but at the price who cares? :)

    But I also get the emotional attraction of .357.. its such a cool handgun round one wants to keep using it in other applications to wring out its fullest potential.

    But it may not pass rational analysis.. but then again our hobby is also about fun...
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2019
  7. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    A guy I shoot with a a really cute little Pedersoli rolling block in .357 Mag. He mostly shoots lead hardcast in it so that he can keep the velocity down below the 1500 fps we require on our 50m range, but has JHP loaded up to the bejabbers for the 100m.
     
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  8. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    The .30-30 puts a 150 gr bullet out at about 2400 fps.
    The .357 puts a 158 gr bullet out at about 1400 fps.
    You can do the math.
     
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  9. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

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    I like the 38 special. For most purposes I prefer it over the 357 magnum. Cimmaron makes a nice 1866 "Yellowboy" in 38 Special. I use one for CAS. Winchester also makes them as well, but they are quite a bit more expensive. They are available with either a 20" or 24" barrel. Loaded up with Trail Boss powder pushing a 158 grain cast bullet, it’s a joy to shoot. Strong enough to ring steel, and good enough for critters up to the size of coyotes if you so desire.
    upload_2019-5-18_6-20-36.jpeg

    My walking around / truck rifle is the Ruger 77/357. It’s quite a bit more capable than the 38 special. I have used it for deer (a few) and feral pigs (a lot). I use the Hornady 140 grain XLR and IMR4227 in it.
    upload_2019-5-18_6-42-59.jpeg

    And if it were available at the time, I probably would of bought the Henry Single Shot in 357 magnum. I am a fan of the single shot rifle and the Henry looks like a good one. I am just waiting, if Henry releases a single shot in 22 Hornet, there will be a Henry Single Shot in 357 Magnum, 22 Hornet and 30-30 Winchester in my safe.
    upload_2019-5-18_6-48-12.jpeg
     
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  10. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    The 357 Magnum factory ammo costs a little more than comparable 38 Sp. Not much.

    The recoil is stronger but an absolute piece of cake, compared to revolvers. You'll be surprised.

    Also the 38 in a 357 chamber will quickly cause fouling upfront. It will cause malfunctions if you decide to shoot 357 afterwards. Cleaning after shooting 38 is more work.
     
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  11. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have had several 357 lever guns over the years, Marlins, and I just picked up a SS, 16 in, Rossi and it fills the bill for a 'fun', behind the door gun.:)
     
  12. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually the carbine length, 16 in bbl in 357, will push the bullets closer to 1800 to 2000 fps.;) But you are correct, it is much less effective than a 30-30.:)
     
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  13. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Way back when i had a Winchester model 92 re-done to .357. Also owned a Rossi .357 rifle. Both soon went away.
     
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  14. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    Here in yUK I've been reloading .38 Special since the late 1980's. I use the same load and the same bullets as I did back then. It costs me about 11c per shot.
     
  15. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member

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    Exactly as explained in the 22short in a 22lr thread.
    The front of the chamber will collect lead & the end of the shorter cartridge (.38) will cause fouling from powder.
    Thanks SGWGunsmith for the explanation on the other thread.;)
     
  16. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have the Marlin 1894CS and an H&R single shot. The 357 factory loads pick approximately 400 fps in the longer barrel. 125 grain 357 is around 2000 fps. It is a good load for both hand gun and rifle. 158 grain 357 will be over 1700 fps. Not a 30-30 but 30-30 revolvers are cumbersome. It is a 100 yard gun. You can load some really mild 38 spl rounds that are good for small game hunting. .36 muzzle loaders were used for squirrels and rabbits. 000 buck could be used or cast your own minie balls. The single shot H&R is especially useful for reduced loads. A Lee Classic loader could even be used in the field. Great set for SHTF. 158 grain fmj would be a good load in bear country.
     
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  17. Shopfox

    Shopfox Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you ever decide to part ways with the 357 H&R, keep me in mind. It's deer legal in Ohio, and should be fine on deer under 100 yards (90% of most shots anyways in these parts). It would be great for my 10-year old.
     
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  18. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've always heard there were a lot of the 92's rebord to .357..... I'd like to get my hands on one
     
  19. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    If I lived east of the Rockies, I would be well content to have a Marlin .357, a Security Six, a Savage 311 20 ga and a .22 rifle and pistol as my entire armament.
    As it is, I have too many scenarios I can imagine, and need something for each of them.
    Plus I have tended to buy stuff that seems to be a good deal. Today, I showed Auntie Jo "TLMrs' new bear pistol".
    "You mean we have TWO of those?" said TLMrs.
     
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  20. EclecticShooter

    EclecticShooter Well-Known Member

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    1. .357 is gonna be somewhat less powerful than your .30-30, but still plenty for deer out to around 100 yards.
    2. That depends on your lifestyle and how much you can spend on your hobby.
    3. I'm very happy with my Marlin 1894 CST. Most lever action .357s are great, but I didn't personally like shooting my buddy's Rossi 92 .357. The action is much rougher than any of the others.
    4. I don't think so. I like lever guns though.
    .357 Magnum is my favorite cartridge of all time. It can do most things a small arm could be called on to do, within reason of course. It's chambered in many a handy carbine and fine revolver too, making it even more delightful.
    My Marlin 1894 CST pictured below. 1557850843473.jpeg
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
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