.357 hurts my ears

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by bisbob, Nov 20, 2012.

  1. bisbob

    bisbob New Member

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    I have been running around three different shooting ranges, renting various handguns to find a couple to add to my collection (Glock 19, SA 1911 RO, S&W 632 (wife's)). Had it narrowed down to trying Sig 226 E squared, Beretta Px4, Beretta 92FS. So, of course, I run into a guy at one range who lets me shoot his S&W 686 Plus revolver. Loved it. Would be a great nightstand/range gun. Too heavy to carry around. Today I rented one and tried the .357 rounds as well as the .38 special rounds. With .357 my hits were spread out over 6.5 inches. With the .38 specials it was only 3 inches. So now I have found a nice revolver that shoots both, but is more accurate with the .38s, as well as making popping sounds compared to dynamite blasts (.357). Okay, perhaps I exaggerate just a little.

    So should I focus on buying a 686 plus, or go for a S&W like the 64 which is made specifically only for the .38 special?
     
  2. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I have the Ruger GP100 in 357/38 and LOVE it. It could be a handy sidearm for woodsy stuff and is the best plinker EVAR with the .38 target rounds. I like both.

    edit* It probably helps that mine has the 6" barrel. Snubbies aren't for fun.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2012

  3. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    if more of a range gun and also used as a HD firearm, i would opt for the 686 with at least a 4" barrel. you can shoot the 38 Spl. in it, but still have the option of 357 Mag. if you want to shoot them as well.

    i shoot 44 Spl. majority of the time for just range shooting, but still shoot full magnums loads from time to time. just remember that if you shoot 38 Spl. in it to clean the cylinder as well or it can difficult to chamber the magnum rounds in it due to the powder residue build-up in the cylinder bores.
     
  4. dks7895

    dks7895 New Member

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    +1 on the Ruger GP100
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Saw the title and thought...
    "no ****, Sherlock" ;)

    Many people like the .357 because it CAN shoot both. But if you get a .38, that's all you can shoot through it.

    Personal choice on this one. I would take the .357. And then just run .38 for practice/plinking, and carry/load .357 for defense.

    Edit to add: I personally think the .38 only chambering is almost obsolete. The only use I see for it is as a dedicated target pistol or super compact revolver.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2012
  6. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    Seems like a no-brainer to me. Go with a .357, preferably a classic Smith. Load it with defensive .38 rounds until you become proficient with the hot .357 rounds. A .357 will give you "room to grow" as a shooter.
     
  7. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    I bought a 357 to shoot 357 rounds. I have a 9mm. Why bother with the 38? It takes a little getting used too but in time you will find the 357 is more accurate than the 38 spl, especially at long range.

    The other posters are right about the 6" barrel. A long barrel gives you a better sight plane and time for the powder to burn.

    I would rather have a 357 snubby than a 38 snubby. While a snub nose revolver isn't the best platform for a 357. The 357 is a one hit load. Most other pistols calibers are not one hit loads.

    What you have to consider is the 357 is going to have a heavier frame. You can find 38 spl revolvers that are very light. You have to decide if you want a lighter gun or a heavy hitter.
     
  8. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    S&W 686 is a great gun that will serve you well for years to come. One note,,,the spread on the .357 rnds compared to the .38 spc may be due to you anticipating the "boom" and flinching. I suspect that with a bit more practice and experience you will be shooting both calibers the same. Personally I like the option that comes with a .357 versus a .38 chambered revolver but concealment is a trade-off...not to easy to conceal an L frame Smith.
     
  9. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    " .357 hurts my ears" ORLY? Put your "big girl panties" on and start shooting real firearms! Or continue as a paperboy on a girl's bicycle!

    [​IMG] Olympus!

    Shop around and you will find many "vintage" Smiths.

    I got this S&W M19-3 for <$400.

    [​IMG]

    With NO modifications, it is my favorite and the most accurate, in my hands firearm in my arsenal. (I shoot the same groups with .38 spl and .357 Rem Mag.)

    [​IMG]

    Off hand, 7 meters slow fire. (That's a 5 1/2" target)

    Not bad for a 42 year old "vintage" Smith in the hands of a 65 year old shooter!



    [NEVER start a fight with an old man, he will just kill you!]
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2012
  10. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    get both. lol.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    As said- go for the .357. Gives you a choice.

    For accuracy, i like THIS one. Puts you closer to the target. :p

    pistols 013.jpg
     
  12. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Love that 19...and those 5 Star loaders are top notch, recently got some for my 28-2.
     
  13. Doc3402

    Doc3402 New Member

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    Due to carbon build-up in the cylinder, if you want a .38 Special you should buy a .38 Special. If your intention is to shoot .357 Magnum with just the occasional .38 thrown in then you should buy a .357. The .357 Magnum revolver will cost you considerably more money, and with a steady diet of .38 Special gunking up the cylinder it will eventually become unusable for .357 without a major cleaning, possibly by a gunsmith.
     
  14. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have an old 586. Beautiful gun. It is just like the one in my avitar. You can shoot .38 Special as much as you want. You will not need a gunsmith to clean it for you. Simply clean the gun properly after shooting it. The cylinder should be cleaned in every revolver every time you shoot it. That is just proper maintenance.
     
  15. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Dogwash!
    If one lacks the ability to clean the gunk rings out of the chambers, one might wish to take up knitting.
    Helpful hint: Keep a .40 or .41 brush handy for the chambers. On a really bad day, you might need a Lewis Lead Remover. Still no big deal with a bit of effort.
     
  16. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Overkill ain't overkillin this one----
     
  17. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have to agree with this. i clean the cylinders everytime i clean the pistol, whether i have shot 44 Spl. or 44 Mag. loads. just seems like a normal routine to me. i have done the same for every revolver i have owned for years. with doing this as a regular cleaning procedure, i have no problem with getting a carbon or powder buil-up in my cylinders.
     
  18. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    Just a note. If you reload for a spl./mag. firearm, only use magnum brass to spl.or mag.specs. I load .44 mag. brass w/lead bullets for spl. and hollow pts. For mag.
    You still must be capable of cleaning the cylinders, just less to keep track of.
     
  19. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey C3. Is that a Dan Wesson 15.2 with the 10 inch barrel on it? I love those revolers. Easy tear down and interchangable barrels and shrouds. Great gun IMHO.
     
  20. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    That be the very thing- DW 15-2 with 10" VHR! Shoots about like carbine, heavy enough that the muzzle stays down even with hot loads.