32-40 Winchester reloading

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Harley_Guy, Aug 31, 2009.

  1. Harley_Guy

    Harley_Guy New Member

    34
    0
    0
    I find that I am in need of reloading equipment for my 32-40 Winchester. It's the 1994 model. Just unwraped it and want to start taking it to the range and getting it sighted in. Don't want to have to pay the price they are asking for ammo, so figured I'd start reloading my own.

    I'm looking for the complete setup, press and dies, and any info on what powder to use, bullets, etc.

    I have reloaded brass when before when I was shooting a Ruger 44 and 357. Sold everything I had to keep the family fed when I got back from Nam.

    Any information would be a great help.

    Thanks,

    Harley Rider
     
  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    2
    0
    If you are talking 1894 Winchester in .32-40, the action is plenty strong for the cartridge if it is in good condition. These have not been made since 1940 so the gun is an antique. I would strongly recommend having it checked by a competent gunsmith.

    .32-40 ammo is not widely available (as I am sure you are aware). Chuck Hawks has some loads on his web site. Brass can be formed from .30-30.

    Check Gunbroker and E-bay for used equipment (it is hard to wear out). Dies should be available. RCBS still catalogs them (they are a bit pricey).
     

  3. Harley_Guy

    Harley_Guy New Member

    34
    0
    0
    It's actually a commemorative Winchester Model 94 carbine, made in 1994. And, yes, it is difficult finding ammo/brass. This rifle has never been fired, and I probably shouldn't fire it do to the value. But, as I have very few weapons, I do want to have a decent amount of ammo on hand for all the guns I have. Buying brass and reloading seems like the least expensive way to accomplish that goal.

    Harley Rider
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    2
    0
    Buying equipment to load up one caliber, one time would not be cost effective. As long as you plan on loading regularly for other calibers, you can save considerable money (and have the satisfaction of "rolling your own").

    Because you will not be shooting and testing the ammo, stay away from the max loads in the books. Max loads may not be safe in your gun and probably will not be as accurate as possible. My rule of thumb is drop below the book max by 1-2 grains on the powder and the load will be pretty darn accurate. I keep a few boxes of assorted ammo for SHTF situations in case I "find" a weapon in that caliber. I have dies for 6 calibers that I do not even shoot. If I scrounge brass from the range, I collect it up and when I have enough, I load it up.