.308 Win. Load Discussion

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by SlamFire, Mar 22, 2009.

  1. SlamFire

    SlamFire New Member

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    308 Win. --

    Working up loads for a Rem. 700P (Police), Leupold Mark 4, 6.5 - 20x 50mm LR/T optics.

    I'm running once fired Federal Match brass, trimmed to 2.005"

    Deburred, polished necks

    Reamed/seated primer pockets, reamed flash hole.

    Hodgdon 4895, Hodgdon 335 . . .

    And looking at Hornandy or Sierra bullets . . . I have 150 gr. 165 gr. 195 gr.

    New rifle here and have neve loaded this caliber for "accuracy" off the bench.

    300 / 500 metre ranges. What's the optimal bullet weight? Load/charge?

    When I get this brass "fire formed" I'll be neck sizing rather than FL.

    I yield the remainder of my allotted time to my esteemed colleagues :D
     
  2. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I have been using Berger 175 grain match target BT part number 30409 bullets in my M1A loads for 500 to 600 yard target and they work very well for this range in this rifle. Different grain weight may work work better in bolt rifle but I'm not sure. My 1000 yard rifle build is a Remmy 700 in .300 Win. Mag. and I intend to use Berger 210 grain match target BT Long Range part number 30419. Krieger is building my barrel with the rifleing rate to match this bullet weight as per Berger's recomendations. I dont think this would be proper weight grain for .308 Win. however. Actually, if you go to the bullet manufacture catalog or web sites you will find that they recomend the barrel rifleing twist rate for their various grain weight bullets that they sell. Know the twist rate rifleing of your barrel, use the factory bullet weight they recomend for your twist rate,and I think this would be a good grain weight starting point when developing your loads for your target rifle. My 2 cents worth.
     

  3. SlamFire

    SlamFire New Member

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    Rem 700 P runs 12" on the rifling.

    I just loaded 42 gr. Hodgdon 4895 and 150 gr. Win. PP bullets. I had them lying around and figure this will be a starting point while I "fire form" for the bolt action and get a .308 Win. neck sizing die.

    I have 165 gr. and 190 gr. bullets. What's the theory on bullet weight for long range -- as in circa 1000 metres?

    Heavier bullet, more interia?

    Lighter bullet, more velocity and flatter trajectory?

    Surfin' the Hornady site now . . .
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2009
  4. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Velocity usually #1. But as I understand it, weight and the inerta it can help carry distance, plays a role also. As I've been reloading for longer range accuracy for a just short while, and I've acquired my info I have to date from Krieger, Berger, and a couple of older semi retired long range 'F' class shooters, my knowledge is limited to what I've picked up over the last 6 months or so. I'm sure there are others on this forum that have been developing long distance target loads for a long time now that can explain better the correlation between velocity and bullet weight.
     
  5. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Your 190gr will not shoot out of a 12 twist. 175 and under for a 12 twist.

    the heaiver bullet is like a bigger car if you are driving a geo metro at 55mph and let off the gas the car is going to come to a stop sooner than a Surburban going 55mph. The more mass takes more power to get going bit once it gets going it is harder to stop. the heaiver bullets will stay supersonic longer than lighter bullets.

    For long range like F-class you want a heavy bullet because you need the bullet to stay supersonic to 1000 yards. The lightest bullet I found on the line was 175gr. most were shooting 185gr or 190gr.

    I got a buddy that shoot a lot of f-class and builds custom rifles for f-class and or tactical. He like using 175gr SMK pushed by a stiff load of Allient Reloader 17.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2009
  6. RePete

    RePete New Member

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    Your running a fine rifle.

    Lose the Federal Brass it's too soft and the primer pockets get too loose too quickly and get Winchester, LC Match or Norma.

    Stick with the 168's and 175's. I've stopped using Sierra's because the Nosler's are cheaper and they go in the same hole as the Sierra's.

    For powder use H4895, RL15.

    I use small base dies for my .308 loads and load to 2.80" OAL.
     
  7. SlamFire

    SlamFire New Member

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    Did we ever decide on twist rate for a 190 gr bullet? I have two other guns for this dia. bullet -- both 30-06.
     
  8. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I stand corrected both Berger and Sierra state a 12" twist will work for a 190gr. bullet. The only way to know for sure is to buy a box and try them out.
     
  9. SlamFire

    SlamFire New Member

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    OK, I found the twist data for bullet weight on the Berger site. Where is it on the Sierra site? Eh? :confused:
     
  10. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Not on their site in their book.
     
  11. SlamFire

    SlamFire New Member

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    I don't do "books" when it's mostly free online. Even Safeway offers FREE WiFi these days.
     
  12. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    The December 2008 issue of "Handloader" has an article that is propbably the most comprehensive test of developing the most accurate .308 load ever undertaken. The article is authored by Gary Sciuchetti and he tests each component & combination of components(brass (factory new vs. once fired), primers, powders, and bullets) to determine which components and combinations of components produced the best accuracy in his test rifle. He litterally spent several months and many thousands of rounds to arrive at his conclusion. He started out with a new Rem. Model 700 VLS and fired the recommended 100 rounds of "break-in" shots. He tested this rifle for 2 months with various ammo including Federal Gold Medal Match before he decided that this rifle was not capable of producing the needed accuracy consistently. He even welded up a new shooting bench to eliminate the possibility that the bench was at fault. He ultimately selected a new Sako-TRG-22 rifle which was guaranteed to shoot 5 shots under .5" at 100 yds. The gun produced .375" - .635" groups consistently, using Fed. Gold Medal Match ammo. His test actually found that "once fired" brass was considerably more accurate than new factory brass, that CCI#250 primers produced the best groups with 45 grains of Varget using Berger 168gr. Match bullets - the average 5-shot group measured .4375" at 100yds. I immediately ordered a pound of Varget and a box of 168gr. Berger Match VLD bullets (at $38 a box!) and loaded some ammo. My 18" DPMS LR-308-B produced a group with 4 rounds touching which was .40" and one "flier" which opened up the group to 1". I was not shooting under ideal conditions since there was a mild cross wind and my bench was covered in snow, but for a semi-auto AR with a short bull-barrel this is phenomenol accuracy. Using 168gr. Sierra Matchkings and BL(C)-2 powder, I always shot 1" - 1.25" groups with this gun, which is still good considering all my shooting has been done in freezing weather. I am certain the authors recommendation of Varget, Berger, and resized brass would produce equally impressive groups in any rifle chambered in .308. A final and very interesting note for all reloaders - he ":endurance" tested 10 varieties of brass by reloading until he achieved case failure. The results were amazing, namely, the most expensive brass (Nosler, Federal Military, Hornady, Federal Plain, Federal Plated, Winchester, Lapua) failed between 11 and 15 reloadings. Whereas Remington Plain, Remington Plated, and Norma lasted from 20 to 24 reloadings before failing. Remington Plain once reloaded brass produced the .4375" 100 yd. group. Nosler, Winchester, and Federal Plated edged-out the Remington in terms of group size by .3281", .3750", and .4063" respectively. In either case, Varget powder behind Berger 168gr. Match bullets seems to be the recipe for accuracy. Incidentally, Berger makes a 168gr. Match bullet in a VLD configuration (Very Low Drag) which has a ballistic coefficient of .535 - higher than anything made by any manufacturer. This is the bullet I tested in my DPMS LR308B. It is recommended for barrels having a 1:13 or faster twist.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2009
  13. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Hey! RL357 is back?? Where have you been? How's your boy doing in the sandbox??

    Welcome Back....

    JD
     
  14. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Hey JD!!! Spring is in the air and my trigger finger is itchin'. Stopped in to see what's new and came across my favorite topic - Shooting and reloading the .308! How have you been buddy? Hope all is well with you. My son got back from Iraq last week - haven't seen him yet, but he redeploys to Afghanistan in January. I told him if he came home with all his body parts intact I would buy him a new DPMS LR308B like his old mans'. I ordered it in November and I'm still waiting! I bet none of the Libturds ever thought their Messiah would become the biggest marketing gimmick the gun industry has ever seen...:)
     
  15. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    That's awesome! I am glad that your boy made it home safe. Semper Fi from head to toe in that household. I am really happy to hear that.

    Welcome back - your contributions have been missed....

    JD
     
  16. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Thank you sir and likewise! There's been something missing lately...I figured out it was the patriotism, intelligent dialogue, and comraderie of you and other's on this Forum. Glad to be back.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009