30-06 recoil

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by mrbirdguy, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. mrbirdguy

    mrbirdguy New Member

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    I have conciiidered getting a 30-06 but don't know about recoil just ii heard it compars to a big load. In a 12. Gauge I have a 870 I am ok with it just shhot a buck hammer slug once got scared of it not the recoil but getting clobbered by the scope
    Reg sluugs don't bother me
    I. Someday might. Want to get an elk or sompting so
    I know the 30-06 is capable. Want to practice with it. And get good befor I decide to go just unshur of recoil
    I am not intrested in expensive calibers to shote just good popular one not hard to get ammo for .....and could do elk maby black bear or wild boars.... thanks
    I also like the 243 its under powered I. Think
     
  2. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Recoil is different for different people. Some 6'8" 250 guys think a 30-06 is a shoulder killer. I am 5'11" and even at my lightest of 165# It was nothing for me to shoot. That said I was shooting 30-06 and 45-70 when I was 10 years old. I will shoot any gun 5 times. Recoil doesn't bother me at all. My 30-06 bucks like a mule on roids. The stock ergo is not right for me. If you get a good gun with a good stock that fits you good and has a decent recoil pad it shouldn't be to bad to shoot. Mine has a steel butt plate so that adds to the ouch factor.

    The 243 is a great caliber but the biggest thing I would ever shoot with it is the little eastern white tails.

    Look into a 270 rem 280 rem and a 260 rem or a 7mm-08. The first two are based on the 06 and the last two are based on the 308. the 280 and 260 will be harder to find ammo for. For elk I think it would be hard to beat the 280 in a non magnum caliber.
     

  3. mcramer

    mcramer New Member

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    You shouldn't get bit by your scope if its set up right. Your eye relief will differ from gun and scope, but most scoped guns I have shot, have at least 2-3 inches of relief. Plus the recoil of the gun should come straight back, and if your doing it right your upper body will do the same.
     
  4. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    I don't notice the kick of an 06 with a steel plate either but I know guys that will whine from one with a pad.
     
  5. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    It depends on the rifle you're shooting. I couldn't stand more than 4 shots out of a Savage 110. I had a huge plate sized bruise on my shoulder for a week. However, I shot 45 rounds out of a Springfield '03 with a pad and felt no pain or stiffness afterwards. The heavier the rifle, the less recoil will affect you.
     
  6. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    You will need to find a rifle that fits you.If the stock doesn't feel good when you shoulder the rifle,it will most likely be compounded when the gun is fired.

    The weight of the rifle also has impact of recoil,a Feather weight rifle is going to have more recoil than a standard weight.

    Most 30/06 rifles have a decent amount of recoil,but not anything painful.
    I have a sporterized A303,and it has a decent amount of recoil when shot from a bench,but you don't feel it when out in the field hunting.

    If you are too worried about the recoil of a 30/06,just get a 308,it will do everything a 30/06 will do with alot less recoil.
     
  7. mrbirdguy

    mrbirdguy New Member

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    What about what I have. Read about 12gaug compairiing it to the 30-06
    Wouuld the 270 be a choice for elk? Or maby black bair or wild boar
     
  8. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I always felt that a 12-ga. kicked a lot harder than my 30-06, but maybe the Remington 742 dampened the recoil some.
     
  9. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    There are alot of calibers that will take down an elk,but it all comes down to knowing the useful range of the gun that you are shooting,and shot placement at the ranges needed to shoot one.
    A wounded elk can go miles away before it stops,so whatever caliber you choose to get,practice alot,and know your rifle and the conditions your going to be hunting in.

    A 270 is also a great caliber,it's just a necked down 30/06,so in the heavier bullets it will still have some recoil.
    A 308 or 7mm/08 would be a great starting point,and a good elk gun out to around 400yrds.
     
  10. spyderfan

    spyderfan New Member

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    My old ithica used to kill me.
     
  11. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    I have a Remington 870 and a Springfield 03A3 30-06 and the 12 gage 870 kicks much harder IMO. Now the Springfield is something I still feel in my shoulder the next day if I shoot it to many times but the 12 gage kicks harder and hurts more the next day.
     
  12. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Lots of good info here. Recoil and capable elk calibers talk is always interesting to me.

    Txhill,

    Brother, you are dead on with the getting a rifle that fits. There used to be a great thread in the Knowledge Base by Dillinger about fitting a stocked gun. I used to use friend's .30-06 rifle for bear and deer in PA that had a custom made stock by by friend's father. We were nearly the same size and build, and that rifle fit me like a glove. I never felt much recoil compared to a new out of box .270 his uncle had. That did not fit me and I hated shooting it. That's right, I said .270. Now, that in itself proved to me that fit was it.

    Most 12 ga shottys can be a bit of a beast with anything other than game loads. I hunt mostly with a 12 ga and you don't feel the kick when you are shooting a game animal. Well, except for the mid to low end magnum shottys.
     
  13. Jeehs

    Jeehs New Member

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    I've personally never shot an '06. But I do use a Remington 870 Express Magnum and a Remington 770 Synthetic in .270 Win. More specifically a 130Gr Remington Core-lokt bullet. The gun has a Nice tight fit on my shoulder and I never feel recoil from it, The gun just jumps back a bit...

    Now my Dad's 870... I can shoot 3'' Magnum birdshot all day long. But if I shot more than a magazine (5 shells) of 2 3/4 '' Buck shot, I really have to be motivated to keep shooting.

    If any of your friends have a few of the calibers that your poking around, see if you can't try one of them to get an Idea. But remember, Every gun is different, Find what fits you.
     
  14. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    As stated above, percieved recoil is more about the rifle than the cartrdige. When I bought my M-700 in .30-06 way back in 1978, I thought it kicked like a horse. Many years later I realized I needed a longer length of pull to better fit that rifle to my long toroso and arms (I am 6'-3"). I had a recoil pad installed to lengthen the stock, and it has not bothered me since. I am sure the extra padding of the recoil pad had something to do with it, but I firmly believe the better fit of the stock to my shoulder is the main reason that I can shoot 60-80 rounds through it at the range with no significant after-effects.

    I shot 48 rounds though my M1 Garand and 48 through my 1903-A3 two weeks ago while working up a new standard re-load for the various .30-06 military rifles I have. Neither rifle inflicted much pain, not the Garand because it is gas operated, nor the 03-A3 because it is a relatively heavy rifle.

    Now with my K98-k (8mm Mauser), I cry like a baby after 10-12 rounds!

    However, I also agee with the previous poster, if recoil is a big concern of yours, get the .308.
     
  15. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    I have a Remy 760 in 30.06 and an sporterized 03 springfield .06 the 760 has more recoil but I don't mind recoil. I also have a Stevens model 200 in .308 that kicks harder than either of my .06s. I can shoot the .06s all day with little discomfort but 20 rounds from the 308 bruses the cheek. Firm cheek weld is necessary but does not seem to reduce the cheek felt recoil in this particular rifle. Although the gun is very comfortable to shoulder, it still kicks relatively hard due to its weight. The Stevens weighs slightly over 6 lbs. Most of the recoil is felt in my cheek which I don't like at all. Usually those who are aprehensive of recoil tend to not hold the butt firmly to the shoulder thinking it won't kick as hard. Recoil felt and a firmly placed butt are inversely proportionate as are those half moon scars over the right eye, which i've never experienced but have witnessed several times. I try not to laugh when I see this happen. A proper fit is important but if the rifle is not held properly it doesn't matter much.
     
  16. Josey Wales '94

    Josey Wales '94 New Member

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    Recoil, as stated, is not noticable when hunting. That being said, recoil is different when I have a scope. I have a .30-06 and mounted a 70$ Bushnell on it. With 200 gr bullets, it kicks. The scope comes back. I get nicked, not bad. I flinch from then on. That is why I bought a Lead Sled for sighting in my rifles. I can shoot my Marlin 1895 45-70 with open sights and not flinch, but it makes me sore as hell. But I'm a 5'11", 200lb high school D-lineman. I have a ways to grow.
     
  17. birdzman

    birdzman New Member

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    Are you using a shotgun scope or a rifle scope? Shotgun scopes usually have a much longer eye relief than a rifle scope.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2010
  18. mrbirdguy

    mrbirdguy New Member

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    Shotgun sccope no never got me just I guess scared me alittle as ii have heard stories
     
  19. birdzman

    birdzman New Member

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    I asked because once at the range we saw a poor guy after he took a shot using a rifle scope on a shotgun, it wasn't pretty.:eek: