3.5 pound trigger questions

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by indyfan, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. indyfan

    indyfan New Member

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    I'm thinking of getting a 3.5 pound trigger installed on my G19

    I've dry fired a G23 with the 3.5 pound trigger and it's pretty damn smooth, but my only worry now is accidental discharges. Will changing to this lighter trigger raise the chances for accidental discharge? Anyone got any experience with the 3.5 trigger?

    I feel pretty shameful asking this question and questioning Glocks safety.


    Also, when I get this trigger job done, does that void the Glock Warranty?
     
  2. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    If you practice safe handling then it shouldn't be an issue. And even with the lower pull you will still have the same travel of the trigger. Just keep your finger out of there until you are ready to put a hole in whatever you are pointed at and you will be fine.:)
     

  3. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    I have a 3.5-lb. trigger connector on my Glock 30, and I love it. My shots break much more cleanly with it.

    To change the trigger weight, you just have to swap out one little part:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfyytGNqohY"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfyytGNqohY[/ame]

    No trigger job required.
     
  4. Neophyte1

    Neophyte1 New Member

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    Glock connector

    Sir; two of my daily type carries; have the 3.5 connector spring deal.
    Do I feel I have created an unsafe situation.

    not at all; "DrumJunkie"; said it best.

    polishing the connector; cleaning all sharp edges; will inprove the motion
    I too changed the trigger; now with an overtravel. seems to work better for me.
     
  5. jeepcreep927

    jeepcreep927 New Member

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    The only thing that makes a gun dangerous is a loose nut on the trigger...

    But the warranty will likely be voided (and by likely, I mean definitely).
     
  6. Infidel

    Infidel New Member

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    KEEP THE BOOGER HOOK OFF THE BANG SWITCH

    If you observe that rule with ANY firearm until you are ready to fire, you will never have a negligent discharge. I don't believe there is such a thing as an accidental discharge...any time a gun in your hand goes bang, it is because YOU did something to make it go bang. Whether or not it went bang in a safe direction or hit the intended target is likewise YOUR responsibility.

    Look at it this way...if you lay your Glock (or any pistol) on your kitchen table, aim a video camera at it, and let it sit. No matter how long it sits there it will never jump up and start spitting out bullets all by itself.

    My comp Glock 17 has the 3.5 Ghost Rocket connector in it. The trigger gauge measures the true trigger pull at 2.78lbs. I have been shooting this Glock 17 in steel matches for over 3 years with the Ghost Rocket in it, prior to that it had the Glock 3.5 connector in it. Shooting, moving, stages starting from the draw...it doesn't matter. I have yet to have a negligent discharge.

    I don't mean to sound preachy, please don't take it that way...I have been a trainer for too many years and this is the one thing I always try to make gospel to my students.

    Just remember that one rule, and you could literally have a totally safe 1 pound trigger. Some of the Open Class shooters have triggers that break under a pound and they don't put holes where they don't want them. It is a function of the shooter, not the gun's trigger.

    Now that that's out of the way...I don't reccomend a 3.5 trigger on a carry gun UNTIL you are totally used to it and have experience with it. You CAN, and I have seen this happen, double tap when you are only trying to shoot singles until you "know" that trigger. The reset is shorter, and if you have a tendency to bounce your finger off the trigger and slap it for the next shot, you will often double tap. That is likewise a finction of the shooter and poor technique. Remember to ride the trigger forward to the reset, then press the next shot. If you are not going to take another shot...remove your finger as soon as the trigger resets...it keeps you in the habit of resetting the trigger.

    Have fun, and for goodness sakes...KEEP SHOOTING!
     
  7. indyfan

    indyfan New Member

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    I finally got the 3.5 trigger. I have yet to take it to the range. When I do, I will post a range report afterwards comparing the difference in grouping that I had shot with my factory Glock trigger.


    Should be interesting.
     
  8. afi1

    afi1 New Member

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    I run a Lone Wolf 3.5lb. connector and olive NY trigger in all my Glocks. It's the only way to go IMO.
     
  9. Logan2302

    Logan2302 New Member

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    Sorry, there are accidental discharges. I've had them happen in rifles and shotguns. (Never a Glock though.). Most of them were mechanical failures, but still accidental.

    Haven't you ever heard of a "Remington moment"?
     
  10. afi1

    afi1 New Member

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    True. I've seen it happen on 700s, and a handful of SKS rifles. An AR can do it if the bolt is locked to the rear and it's slammed on it's stock.
     
  11. Punisher56

    Punisher56 New Member

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    With practice you will be able to shoot the Glock from the trigger
    reset position which will speed up follow up shots significantly. I've
    been shooting Glocks since 1994 and have installed 3.5 connectors
    in all of my pistols. Also for more speed and smoother action
    I've also installed "Lightning Strike" titanium strikers and plungers.
    I probably would not recomend going this far with a new Glock
    shooter however when you master your pistol there are a lot of
    trick out items you can purchase.
     
  12. afi1

    afi1 New Member

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    Oh... Polish every metal to metal contact surface, including sear, trigger bar, trigger connector, firing pin block ect... It'll smooth everything up. Like someone else said, practice shooting from reset. A good way to learn is to make yourself hold the trigger to the rear after a shot, then let out to reset and press again when you're ready to shoot. Do it slow, so you don't start slapping the trigger.
     
  13. Infidel

    Infidel New Member

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    Okay I will give you that....sorta. But I would still classify that as a "discharge due to mechanical failure". I know it is nitpicky.

    The older Ruger Mk I and MkII autos had a nasty habit of going BANG if they had a round chambered and the safety was taken off. So yes, that would qualify as accidental under the "discharge due to mechanical failure or flaw". As long as you kept the thingy with the hole in the end pointed in a safe direction...you were okay. Wait, that's one of them there safety rules.:D

    So, I will ammend my statement to 99.9999999999999999999999999999999% of the time, there is no "accidental" discharge. That being said.."Absent a mechanical failure or flaw, there is no such thing as an accicental discharge." That's what I will go with now.