28 guage, why bother?

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by pumpkinball, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. pumpkinball

    pumpkinball New Member

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    Holy crap, I knew they existed, but who buys them? I was walking around Wal-Mart today and I saw the shotshells on the shelf and decided to gander for a minute. Yep 28's. I opened the box up and looked at one. To me it looks like a waste of a design. My view says major knock down= 12guage(10guage if you're real serious), less kick=20guage, and plinking or small game=410bore. So why in the world would someone want a 28? Personally it's like the 16, does it have a real purpose? If so, please explain! I'd really like to know. Oh and while I'm on this... I have yet to comprehend why the #### a box of 410's are double the cost of 12/20's. Let's think on this one, right? Flippin morons know that we'll pay it is all that I can figure. Phew!!! Now I feel better since I got to vent.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 5, 2010
  2. Uncle Tom

    Uncle Tom New Member

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    28g

    Probably wouldn't be around except for Skeet -- one of the 4 gauges used in competition. People like the 3/4oz@1200fps load characteristics -- and of course the mild recoil for even a lightweight gun.
     

  3. M14sRock

    M14sRock Active Member

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    The affordable cost of 12/20 is due to the massive amounts they churn out. The 28 and .410 are for purists. The lead is the same with them, but the shot pattern is smaller. Once you become accurate enough to hit every shot, it is common to drop down a guage.

    There is a guy who shoots at my skeet club and he hunts everything with a .410. Effing showoff.
     
  4. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    Got a buddy that is a ruffed grouse hunting maniac. He's got 12's and 20's but he takes the 28 out 90% of the time. He shoots very well and gets many birds. The o/u 28 is light, balanced and quick swinging in the laurel thickets on the mountain, and a box of 28's weighs much less in the vest than 12's. He shoots well enough with the 28, that I doubt he would get any more birds using a larger guage.
    I on the other hand couldn't hit one with a 105 loaded with cannister. :p
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    If the 28 puzzles you, the TON of 32 guage shot at doves in South America will really puzzle you.

    Great bird round if you are a decent shot, very mild recoil, light guns, swing fast, etc. Reason for all those flavors over in the ice cream section. Some like vanilla, some chocolate, some Cherry Garcia.
     
  6. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I have to respond since the OP mentioned 16ga and love them. I currently only have 1 but a true 16ga has a purpose. They USED to be built on their own frames so they were smaller then a 12ga which made them lighter to carry, easier to swing/point at the same time they were only slightly bigger then a 20ga. The 16 would throw more lead then a 20 during this time(the 20 has filled the gap thanks to technology) so it was known to hit harder. The 16 was known to, "carry like a 20 but hit like a 12".

    The sad thing is that now if you buy a 16ga you are getting nothing but a 12ga with small barrel/s so the advantage has been lost. You can thank the cost of manufacturing for that. The gap between the 12 and 20 has gotten so small people don't see a need for a 16. Add to that people belief that simply holding a 12ga will clear a room and the 16 loses more interest.

    I may be weird but to me a 16ga is cool. I've taken more dove with my 16 then any other shotgun. I also bought 250 rds of Federal high brass(that's right, the nice purple ones) for $21 at a pawn shop because he said he couldn't sell them. He asked if I had $25 cash. I told him no, only $21. He smiled and said, close enough.
     
  7. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

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    It's called fair chase. I hunted pheasant with guys that use a 28 and I often hunt with a single shot .410. If I limit out early it pisses the dog off to no extent when I'm done hunting and she's not.

    Always remember it's called hunting and not killing. If you use a Red Ryder BB gun and I use a Parker side by side, it's all the same, where still hunting.
     
  8. Walley

    Walley New Member

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    The 28 gauge patterns about the same as a 20 gauge with less recoil and are usually lighter guns. For starting a young shooter they are ideal because of their denser pattern than the 410 and less kick than the 20. I have hunted with both the 410 and the 28 gauge for over 60 years, shot skeet for 40 years and feel that if one is not comfortable doing so they are missing a great part of gun sports. These little guns have a grace and beauty that larger guages can’t match. It does take quite a bit of practice to become proficient with small bores but practicing is part of the enjoyment of shooting and hunting
     
  9. A5Mag12

    A5Mag12 New Member

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    I duck hunt quite a bit with a 28 gauge. Great for those holes that require a 2+ mile hike just to get there. A bigger gun aint going to kill um any deader.
     
  10. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

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    My favorite gauge--there is no upland game that won't go down with a 28ga, and nothing is nicer than a sweet 28ga side by side. It's one of those things that you have to shoot and carry to appreciate. They also make some very nice 1 oz hunting loads for the 28ga--which by the way is now the standard hunting load for 20 gauge and is becoming standard for light or economy 12 gauge loads. My wife has a Remington 1100 in 28 gauge (a sweet ladies gun), I have several side by sides, and OU, and a Rem 870--love them all.
     
  11. Walley

    Walley New Member

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    I am the proud owner of a L. C. Smith 28 gauge s x s that I got as a gift as a teenager over 56 years ago that money can’t buy. Also an English made s x s that gets a lot of use. All told I have six 28s and nine 410s, all break actions, in my cabinets. The largest bore I hunt with is 20 gauge for late season pheasants, after they have been shot over for a month or so and don’t hold well for the dogs, and slugs for deer. My sixteens and twelves are pretty much cabinet queens. I have never understood the concept that you have to have a twelve for upland game of any kind.
     
  12. pumpkinball

    pumpkinball New Member

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    Wow! I really didn't get it. Now I do. Thanks for helping out an ammeture gun enthusiast. As I said I couldn't figure it out. But apparently there was a reason, now I know what it is. Maybe I'll check into one of them now.
     
  13. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

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    Finally someone who is a purest and understands. Amen to you Walley!
     
  14. Walley

    Walley New Member

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    I guess that you might say that I am a purest as there are a total of two pumps and one bolt-action shotguns in my collection. Everything else is single shot, O/U or S X S. I much prefer to hunt with the single shots for the challenge. For me the hunt is what is important not the killing.
     
  15. 556plinker

    556plinker New Member

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    helpful tip

    carry a auto 12 all day hunting quail or pheasants and then the next day carry a 20 or 28........it will become quite evident of the use for smaller gauges. I'll take a 20 or 28 gauge shooting 1oz for the tradeoff of shooting 1-1/8 oz of a 12 anyday in the birdfield. IMHO I think you get a little better pattern performance in the lighter gauges. I have a Franchi renaissance 20 gauge and a 1187 12 gauge.......I've shot a lot of quail with both and prefer the 20. I wouldn't have any qualms or concerns about dropping down to a 28. My preference is to have the 12 as a waterfowl and turkey gun and use the 20 for smaller birds.
     
  16. R.R.

    R.R. New Member

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    Walley,
    If you do own a vintage L.C. Smith 28 ga, you may be surprised to find out "what money can't buy".
     
  17. Badshot320

    Badshot320 New Member

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    *gasp* you cant be serious
     
  18. Badshot320

    Badshot320 New Member

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    I dont know the history behind it but Im guessing the 28ga was a ploy to get girls to shoot shotguns. Didnt they all come in pink and have a free rain slicker? Dont hate on me Im just stirring the pot for all you mans that actually have one.
     
  19. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

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    Some shooters are skilled and proficient enough to hit 25 straight in skeet and bag their limit in pheasants with a 28 gauge--some aren't, need a 12 gauge cannon, and still can't to do the same...:)