.270 long range?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by tuckinauster, Apr 12, 2008.

  1. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    So this summer I'm looking into shooting competitively with a friend of mine. Seeing as that I'm on a budget and cant afford to buy or build a new weapon anytime soon I will be shooting my Marlin MR7 in a .270. So far I am able to shoot 1 MOA up to 400yds. I haven't shot much past that to have a good idea of my accuracy. My question to you guys; is the .270 a capable caliber up to say 8 or 900yds? I know a lot depends on the rifle and ammunition, as well as ambient conditions. I have been searching for awhile and have been unable to find much info regarding the .270 and shooting long range. I would really appreciate your input on the caliber as well as what I could do to my rifle to make it more accurate. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. fluffo63

    fluffo63 New Member

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    ..just a guess,i would say that it would be a great round..
    but i know the 30-06 the bullet grain can be lowered alot
    for long range shooting my guess the 270cal will be the same??
    they will be a reply come threw with a good anser:D
     

  3. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I think in the right hands the .270 COULD be used at those extreme ranges, but before we get to that point, can you give me some idea of what your Marlin MR7 is/has been done to it?

    Generaly speaking, for long range shooting, if you have a factory action, that hasn't been blueprinted, with a basic scope ( 10X or 12X ), a thin "sporter" style barrel, no glass bedding, or things of that nature, you are probably going to get your @ss handed to you. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but a factory stick isn't going to be able to compete.

    The good news is, some easy mods can be had for not a lot of money, so please give us a run down of your rifle and perhaps we can help you get in the money. *thumbs up*
     
  4. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    Basically the rifle is factory except for a little trigger work. I have a Harris Bi-pod and a Scheels 4.5-14 prower scope on it right now. I know the scope is pretty low-end, and I've been researching new ones but I can't make up my mind yet. The problem I'm running into is the lack of aftermarket support for this weapon. I would like to be able to put a heavy barrel on it with out having a custom one made. I know the action is very similar to the Remington 700, and if it's possible I'd like to use either a McMillian or Choat stock. Of course, neither company lists any products for the MR7. If any of you have suggestions or ideas on how to improve my rifle I am all ears.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Well, I did some reading on the Marlin MR-7 and there is good and bad news. The good news is that it resembles a Model 700, which has a ton of parts and goodies available for it.

    The bad news is that I couldn't find anyone out there that is marketing for it specifically, so it might not be a direct drop in style replacement.

    I have never handled one before, so I am just going off the pictures and write ups that I read.

    Optics will go a long ways towards helping with your score, but I don't think you need to start there. I assume you will be reloading your own ammo for competition? Fire formed brass in your chamber is more accurate than off the shelf ammo, plus you can fine tune for bullet speed and grouping accuracy.

    From the write ups, it would appear the stock is pillar bedded to the action, so you could improve on that with a glass bedding procedure and make sure the barrel is 100% free floated for harmonics. You should be able to run a dollar bill from the end of the stock all the way up to the action without any problems when done correctly. Again, I haven't seen your weapon, so I am kind of talking generalization here.

    A new firing pin, made of titanium, is a drop in replacement item and will cut down lock time. It will also generate less forward inertia which does unseat the bolt VERY briefly when it bottoms out on the inside of the bolt itself. Not a big deal, but we are talking budget fixes here that can add to accuracy.

    Are you shooting from the bipod or standing/sitting/kneeling across the course style? If not from the bipod, lose it obviously and get yourself a good quality leather sling. Something you can really cinch up and make a good platform to shoot from.

    A good recoil pad will take some of the sting out of the shot, can be had for pretty cheap and is easy to install. If the weapon is a pleasure to shoot, you will shoot it more, which will only make you better in the long run.

    Outside of that, you are getting into the $$ category of stripping it down, blueprinting the action out, getting a custom barrel for it and having it fitted, getting a new custom stock for it and basically rebuilding from the ground up. You can do it all in stages, but it will cost you some money to do it right.

    Hope that helps.

    D
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    IF the gun is accurate and capable of consistant MOA accuracy it should be a decent starter rifle. For very long range work you will also need a bullet that is accurate at those ranges. Generally, boat tail bullets on the heavier side work better as they A. drift less in the wind and B. stay supersonic at longer ranges. Bullets tend to get goofy when they drop below Mach I. The turbulence caused by the breaking of the sound barrier (in reverse) is very detrimental to accuracy. Most long range shooters use heavier bullets as they stay supersonic longer.
     
  7. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    Once I start shooting competitively I will be shooting hand loads from brass I have already fired. Thanks for this info though, as I was probably going to go with a lighter bullet, somewhere around 130 grains. I think I'll up it to 150 or 160 depending on what the guy that does my reloading recommends.
     
  8. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    I'm not afraid of doing it right, and spending the money in stages to make it right. Do you, or anyone else have a recommendation for a custom barrel? As this would probably be my first major upgrade, seeing as I can free float the walnut stock easy enough my self a custom stock could be put on the back burner for the time being. Also I know a very good gunsmith that could work my action over. I'll have to talk to her and see what kind of deal she could work out for me.

    Thanks a ton for the input thus far, I'm really looking forward to learning more!
     
  9. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    This might be a double post - I thought I had entered a response, but when I came back to check it for spelling, it's not there. Hmmmmm

    There are quite a few really excellent barrel makers up in Minnesota. I don't know what is in the water up there, but they sure can turn out some good barrels.

    Krieger is the barrel I have on each one of my rifles and they are a very good brand. Excellent reputation and they stand behind their products.

    Recently my 'smith put a Mike Rock 5R barrel on his .308 Winchester and that thing shoots AMAZING. It's definitely one of the best shooting barrels I have ever seen. I am considering having mine rebarreled in the Fall with a 5R myself.

    Either one of those is a good quality rifle barrel that will treat you right. There are others out there ( Shilen, Douglas, Hart ) but we use pretty much Kreiger in the shop.

    If your stock is wood, you definitely want to glass bed that baby before competition - I have never seen a comp rifle that wasn't. :cool:

    D
     
  10. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    Interesting, I live just over an hour away from Krieger. I'll have to give them a shout sometime and see what they can do for me. About how much should I expect to spend on a finished barrel mounted on my action from them? I don't want to sound like too much of a newbie when I call.
     
  11. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    The mr7 is a mashup of guns (Not that this is a bad thing). The reciever is that dreded model 700 design that Dillianger Hates (just funnin ya) With a Savage style barrel attachment design. The trigger I believe is like a remington.

    The fastest way to get a new stock is to take it to a local gunsmith and tell them what stock you want to put on it and they will have to inlet the stock from scratch. $350-$500. You really want piller bedding for this as well.

    At the same time You are going to need to have the barrel replaced with a match grade barrel. Any good gunsmith will be abe to thread it and fit it to the reciever. Since you have the gun all apart it needs to be blue printed to make sure everything is true and square to the action axis. You are going to want a light weight firing pin to lower your lock time. Now we are down to the trigger for long range stuff I am going to say you do not want anything over 1 to 1.5# if you are going to only use this rifle for LR Bench shooting then you are going to want to drop that to no more than 6oz most bench guns are running 1.5 to 2oz triggers. Blue Print is going to be $250 to $300 trigger is going to be from $75 to $175. The barrel is going to cost from $400 to $500 for barrel and install.

    Now you have a rifle that will shoot 1/2 moa but that is still not good enough.

    Accuracy is like speed. The more you want to more is cost. For a good bench gun figure on dropping $3000 on the rifle and another $1000 to $2000 on the glass.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2008
  12. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    In our shop a barrel is about $300 shipped to us and it's about $300 to $350 to cut a new chamber in your desired caliber. If you want the action blue printed at the same time, or if you want barrel fluting to reduce weight, or anything else, then Brett does a sort of action package deal and you get a better overall price instead of doing it piece meal. Looks like from Krieger direct they charge $270 to cut a chamber for you on their own barrel & $60 to thread it to your action, but I think you have to provide them the action, so you will be without it for awhile.

    CptTango is right - For better results you have to spend more money. And I don't hate the Remington, I just think there are better choices out there. But it is good that we can exchange opinions about it and still remain friends. :D

    If you're shooting benchrest, like real competition bench rest, no factory stick is going to compete, you will need to design and build a gun from the ground up. That gun will look nothing like your average weapon and can have all sorts of crazy sh!t done to it like electric triggers and big rails on the sides of the stock to travel smoothly on the bag. The guys that do serious benchrest shooting have some CRAZY guns that run into the multiple thousands of dollars - and that is before they add a $2000 or $2500 custom, enhanced reticle, 40x power scope. :eek:

    D
     
  13. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    I think your getting a little ahead of what I'm trying to accomplish. I'm not looking at turning this rifle into the ultimate benchrest weapon. Although I do plan on shooting in some competetions, I will still use it for hunting/paper punching. I can see spending 400ish on a good target barrel, and down the road sometime another few hundered on a custom stock. Blueprinting the action is definatly a possibility, but will have to wait for now. As far as optics go, there is no way I can justify spending a grand on a scope. Although it probably would be really nice... Anyway, keep in mind guys this will be a multi-purpose rifle. I'm just looking to squeeze some more accuracy out of it.
     
  14. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    There are a few places out there that will do a complete over haul of your action. I forget the name of the place I was looking at. But they cost about $250 or $300 for an action tuning. Hill Country Rifles is the place to get some work done. Prices are rather good as well.

    For optics I would go with Bushnell's Elite 4200 line. Great glass some of the best comming out of japan. I got my 6-24x40mm for $413 with shipping.

    When you go to buy your barrel make sure you get a single point cut rifling as this type does not add any stress to the barrel where as the Button rifled barrels have added stress from the button being pulled threw the barrel. Also I would have my new barrel chambered into a 270 Ackly improved. This will give you a bit more accuracy and speed over a regular 270 Win.

    One thing none of us have mentioned is once you find a good smith it will take a while for him to do the work because he is good he will be backed up. I have had people tell me that if it does not take a month or more the gunsmith is not worth taking your rifle too. I unfortunatly have found this to be true. Took my 308 target rifle to a place to have a rear mount made for the scope. First guy did not do a damn thing but turn the mount around backwards and glue it on with some Blue Lock Tite. The next guy bashed it with a hammer untill he almost destroyed my action then tried to blame me for the damage to my rifle. When I pulled out pictures I had taken the day before taking it to him he quickly changed his story and promptly took my rifle and fixed the damage and reblued the action (Which was in need of being done anyways). Be picky be very picky about your gunsmith. Thy are like doctors you don't want the one that got a C average in school do you?
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2008
  15. tuckinauster

    tuckinauster New Member

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    Ok gents, I found some more info about the competitions today. The longest range is at 600yds, which is well within my rifles capability. Today I shot 1 MOA groups consistently with cheap federal 130grain ammo. I think with some better ammo and less wind I could tighten the groups up a bit more. I was also told by one of the people that shoots in the competitions that if you could hit a pie plate at 600yds you would be competitive. So I think I'm going to wait until I get my AK before I spend money to accurize the .270. I really appreciate your input, and I will keep this thread updated as I work on my rifle and my skill.
     
  16. CreepingDeath

    CreepingDeath New Member

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    first thing if your rifle is shooting moa dont worry about pricey upgrades at the moment, buy one of these Weaver 4-20X50 Super Slam Riflescope Side Focus Dual-X Reticle Matte - Natchez Shooters Supplies they are a really good scope for very good money at the moment, they dial repeatably have glass on par if not better than the bushy 4200's and some far more expensive leupolds. Invest in a some good mounts dont skimp here as you scope will only be as good as the mounts holding it there. Then get out and practise, spend some money on load development and then spend some quality time behind your rifle, then youll find out what its truely capable of, then you can make some decisions on what needs to be done. If it were me I'd look at selling and buying something a little more aftermarket freindly like a rem700 ,not knocking the marlin ,its just what I would do.