.223 Rem vs 204 Ruger

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by bessemerbob, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. bessemerbob

    bessemerbob New Member

    71
    0
    0
    I am hearing good things about both rounds and some negs about each. My goal is shooting up to 300yrds. I am rulling out shooting a 22 so please dont try to sway me that way lol, but for range shooting, in the 200 to 300 yard range what is the better round....
     
  2. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    Depends on what your shooting and what your shooting at. If you want a 300 yard hunting rifle I would go with either in a bolt gun weather it is a Remington, Howa or Savage. Most 223 bolt guns run a 1:12 twist and will let you shoot up to a 60 gr bullet. anything up to 62gr will get you out to 300 with ease. the 204 is faster and shoots a little flater but it also uses lighter bullets which allows them to lose velocity faster. the 204 is a great cartridge as is the 223. Either will do the job on small varmints and paper out to 300 easy.
     

  3. Gene Langston

    Gene Langston New Member

    27
    0
    0
    If I weren't so heavily invested in the .223, I might opt for the .204. But, I"ve got all the stuff for a .223, including bullets, brass, etc.

    Both are really good rounds for varmint shooting. Going beyond that, the .223 has an edge, say in deer hunting ( a big edge, really.)
     
  4. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    YOU MUST watch your state game laws. Many states do now allow the use of a 22 cf on deer or any game animals.
     
  5. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

    5,250
    0
    0
    I considered .204, .223 among others in the end I decided on the .223 because I am not a reloader and prices are unbeatable for practice/target rounds and ballistics are close enough to not be a major factor for me.

    If you look at my post about my Howa, I was shooting with 2 other people, 1 had a .204 and the other a .243. All of the guns were able to hit the bullseye at 185 yards. I would say the individual shooters affected the groups more than the calibers at that range.
     
  6. bessemerbob

    bessemerbob New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Thanks group..... I am going to go with the .223 This will be a range gun, no hunting. Please dont try to get me on the 22lr, I want something that still packs a little punch at 300yrds. I think I am going to go with the Savage 12 series. I was thinking Remington 700 SPS but the savage comes stock with 1-9twist and accu trigger. Plus 100-150 less on the wallet!
     
  7. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

    4,077
    4
    38
    I wouldn't dream of suggesting ANY rimfire at 300 yards! Nobody in their right mind shoots rimfires at 300 yards expecting to do very good or ethnically TRY to take animals that far with rimfires. The .223 will be more economical and ammo is MUCH easier to find.
     
  8. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    Good choice with the savage. You can shoot up to 70gr bullets with that 9 twist I think.
     
  9. bessemerbob

    bessemerbob New Member

    71
    0
    0
    I would dare say Savage might have jumped past Remington, at least the 700 line.... Savage is making some very nice guns these days, and my 270WSM that Ill be trading in soon is a very nice gun.

    Ive read alot of guys are having great luck at 300yrds with 60-69grn bullets. Well Ill need to really look into ammo once I actually have the weapon in my hands.
     
  10. Gene Langston

    Gene Langston New Member

    27
    0
    0
    If you intend to shoot those heavier bullets, make sure to check the twist rate. Savage MAY be slower, like a 12-twist, can't remember. I don't think that slow of a twist will stabalize a heavy bullet all that well.

    Edited: The Savage rifles have a 1:9 twist, should stabalize a 69 gr. bullet fine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
  11. bessemerbob

    bessemerbob New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Greenhorn question, but the lower the number on the twist rate= a tighter bore(more grooves)? So the savage 1-9 would put more spin on the bullet then a 1-12???
     
  12. SlamFire

    SlamFire New Member

    220
    0
    0
    It's not about grooves and lands. There might be any number. Rifling is specified in terms of rotation. One complete circle in a set number of inches.

    1:12 -- one turn in 12" inches.

    When someone speaks of rifling in terms of "12" or "9" they're talking about inches for one full turn/rotation.
     
  13. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    yes more spin. The heaver the bullet the faster the twist need to be to stabilize the bullet.

    It is not really the weight of the bullet it is the length of the bullet. If you have a 55gr bullet that is twice as long as a normal 55gr bullet then you are still going to need a tighter twist (1:9 or 1:8) to stabilize that bullet. It just so happens that with you increase the length of a bullet you add weight and when you had weight you have to add length. Same goes for a 70gr bullet if you have a 70gr bullet that is the same size as a 55gr bullet it will stabilize in a 12 twist barrel.
     
  14. bessemerbob

    bessemerbob New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Well this is just more fuel for the savage fire! The savage 12series guns come out of the box with 1-9 twist. and 26'' barrels.
     
  15. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    In the for what is worth department, the actual term for a spinning bullet is (gyroscopic stabilization). I'm loading 69 gr. Sierra Match King for the .223 and Sierra demands a 7"-10" twist barrel only, for these bullets. I think that the 1in9 twist is a pretty good choice also. Disclaimer; that's just my opinion and intelligent rebuttal is always welcome. HJ
     
  16. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

    4,077
    4
    38
    That's the proper description but the easiest explanation of that method is rotational stability.
    As in the bullet achieves rotational stability with a certain twist.


     
  17. bessemerbob

    bessemerbob New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Well guys to put it in simple terms I F'ed up. Went to the gun shop and let me emotions get the best of me. Came home with the Remington 700 VTR in .223//////// Crap this isnt what I was after. This gun all along was a lil too much $ so I didnt research it but the deal they gave me on my trade if I bought this gun was sweat. So without thinking it out I came home with it.... Now after researching after my purchase I think I might have made a big mistake. This isnt built for 300yrd range shooting but tactical and hunting........It did shoot ok at 100yrds today, and was so so at 200.... But what Ive read so far Ill be having a hard time at 300...... I might have to bite the bullet(no pun indtended) and see what I can get it for a trade at my old gun shop and just get the stinking savage!

    Dang it I feel stupid
     
  18. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    Don't feel stupid. That remington will shoot. If I were going to keep it I would dump the stock for a Bell and Carlson or something along that line.
     
  19. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

    2,705
    3
    38
    + 1 on that. get rid of the factory stock. Bell and Carlson or McMillan A-5. Also, you will probably eventually go there and get a target barrel. Check out Krieger and Bartlien barrels. They're not that much money for what your getting. They both have a 6 to 7 month wait but they help alot for long range accuracy. Myself, I have a #9 (Heavy Target) Krieger ordered for my long range target rifle. Get a oversize recoil lug as well when you change out your factory barrel. If you do order a aftermarket stock you might consider new bottom metal with a detachable magazine. McMillan is geared up to use Badger Ordance bottom metal with detachable magazines that come with (1) 5 round magazine. You can buy extra magazines for about $80.00 or so bucks and the magazines are made by AI. This brand set up is real nice quality. Also you might consider a Timney or Jewell brand trigger. These triggers can be set down to just a few ounces pull weight. They have no creep and break like glass. The newer Remington triggers are pretty good as well and a gunsmith can get the pull weight down pretty low. Remington 700's are like Small Block Chevys. There is more aftermatket parts available for consideralbe less money than most other brands of bolt rifles out there. This is something to consider when deciding to go to another brand of rifle.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
  20. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

    4,077
    4
    38
    You can get that Remington to shoot! Don't despair until you give it a good chance & work up a load for it. Also Remington 700s lend themselves to all kinds of accurizing tricks.