.223 length

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by aandabooks, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    How long do you guys let your .223 brass get before trimming down to book length? I've got a bunch to process and I really hate trimming and deburring.
     
  2. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Don't let them go over 1.760" (Max length.)
     

  3. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    You need to go by the specified length of a good quality reloading manual.

    03
     
  4. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    1.750" is what my books list. I normally trim to 1.745". What is the longest I can let them go? These are going in my M&P15.
     
  5. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    1.750" is the recommended TRIM TO length in most reloading manuals.

    The SAAMI spec for the .223Rem is 1.760" (- .030).
    So the maximum length is 1.760" and the minimum length is 1.730".
     
  6. Bayou

    Bayou Active Member

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    Hornady 8th edition lists max length as 1.76" with a trim to length of 1.75".
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    I trim to 1.745

    All my 223/556 cases get trimmed to 223 spec at 1.745 middle of the road. I have a LOT of this type of brass and its such a chore I use a dillon electric trimmer in the xl650 to do them all when the bucket of brass gets close to the top.

    What you need to be concerned with is how thick is the web. As you shoot reload time resize and so on the brass you remove comes from somewhere. What I do is sort by headstamp, weigh and segragate into 1 grain of weight difference piles. Take one from the pile with the lightest average weight cut it at the base of the case and examine wall thickness. If it looks thin all of that weight gets recycled.

    Its still work but it prevents case head seperation as the brass gets thinner from use
     
  8. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    I have lots of 5.56 brass as well. I shoot a lot of 80 gr bullets and want as much bearing surface as possible between the case neck and the bullet, so I trim my cases to 1.755".

    I reload in 1K batches and use a Gracey power trimmer. It works like an electric pencil sharpener. You simply stick the case neck in the end, and it trims, chamfers and de-burrs the neck all at the same time. Done in no time at all. :)

    http://www.matchprep.com/trimmer.htm
     
  9. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    In doing some random checking on the batch I am currently working on the longest I found was 1.757". I guess I'll be able to load these up and shoot them again. They have been fired twice.
     
  10. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    If you are loading bullets with a cannelure and crimping the case mouths, it's best to trim all your cases to an equal length. That way the crimp doesn't end up above or below the cannelure due to varying case lengths. Consistency in your reloading methods helps maintain the accuracy of the ammo you produce.

    For bullets without a cannelure and using a light taper crimp it's not a problem unless you exceed the maximum case length.
     
  11. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    measure after full length sizing if using a semi auto or if a bolt gun and nack sizing after neck sizing.

    measuring a fired case tells you nothing