.223 / 5.56mm for coyotes.

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by randy420, Jun 26, 2013.

  1. randy420

    randy420 New Member

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    I am thinking about using my ar15 for coyotes but all the ammo I have for it is fmj. That's also all I can find in stores if I'm lucky enough to find any to begin with. Is fmj ethical to use for coyotes? If the .223 / 5.56 fmj isn't I could take my dad's 91-30 mosin.

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  2. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

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    If you are 'hunting' them, then all of the information such as license fees, season, restrictions (including cartridge definitions) should be in your state's Hunting Regulations. If your state allows FMJs, then of course it's ethical. FMJs can quickly do the job (below)

    If you are protecting persons, your flock, herd or other animals on your property, it is no longer the same ethics question.
    I would use a rock, axe, digging bar, fmj, or automobile if it would stop a loss of person or property.

    Your state may differ with my opinion, but WA state is pretty good for using lethal force in the protection of person or property. I personally have not heard of any problems with people taking care of their own in my neck of the woods. It is rural/farm/range.

    Taking out the one bad apple may change pack behavior such that you have not problems for some time.
    The .223/5.56 works fine on dispatching Coyotes. As always, shot placement may be more important aspect of terminal ballistics and effectiveness
     

  3. randy420

    randy420 New Member

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    I live in Indiana and there are no firearm restrictions for moondogs. I will have to check for restrictions on loads. I plan to sell the furs.
     
  4. randy420

    randy420 New Member

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    I checked and it didn't say anything about fmj for fox and moondogs.
     
  5. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

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    Although FMJs may not be specifically stated, they may be negated by other language. Such as 'soft points' or other exclusive requirments.

    Fox and Coyote.. I am familiar with. MoonDogs? Beyond my range!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_dog
     
  6. randy420

    randy420 New Member

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    Moondogs are coyotes. I just started calling them that about a year ago and the name stuck.
     
  7. randy420

    randy420 New Member

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    Again, it didn't say anything about it. The book just said there wasn't any restrictions for firearms on foxes and moondogs (coyotes) .
     
  8. johnr1943

    johnr1943 New Member

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  9. johnr1943

    johnr1943 New Member

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    In NC, IIRC, it open season on coyotes - no license, no restrictions (where firing rifles is OK). If you're CCW, and approached/threated, that is OK - although you better be sure of the target area.

    They have spread to all 100 counties in NC over the last decade or so. Don't leave little Fe-fee out at night -we lost smaller pets that way. Ours are very cagey. :)
     
  10. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    You need to remember, your kill zone is very small and coyotes are very fast. A carbine w/ a 16" barrel and I'm not sure what kind of optic that is can be put to shame by Wyley Coyote. I was using a HB DCM w/ a 20" barrel and a 3-9x32mm carbine scope. It was enough in the woods, but was severely lacking at distance when they were moving. I changed to a CZ527 Varminter w/ a Sightron SII Big sky 6.5-20x42mmAO. It is a great low light, night time optic when the moon is close to full. I also use a Browning A-bolt Gold Medalion .22WMR topped w/ and older Bushnell Trophy 3-9x42mm around home. Rimfire only. You can get one a night if you are pateint. A 12ga w/ #4 lead works great under 50 yards and if you can bait it is a deadly combo w/ a semi auto. I get pig hearts and livers, freeze them. Pull them out the night before and put them in a 5gal bucket w/ a tight lid. I use a 50lb nylon onion sack, put the bloody parts in and steak them out in a clearing. Let the yotes get into a frenzy trying to get them and run, then let loose.
     
  11. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

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    .223 is fine for coyotes, IMO. I'd use an expanding bullet, though, which would not only be more likely to give you a clean kill but would also probably not make an exit hole in that pelt you want to sell.

    A fellow up here says he has killed quite a few wolves with .223 and is partial to the Barnes bullet for that job. A big wolf will go way over 100 lb. So, with the right bullets and accurate shooting, it'd be just fine for 'yotes.

    ps: A lot of coyotes will take a lot of deer. Just sayin'....... Choot 'em! :)
     
  12. Seven

    Seven New Member

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    Ethical? Nothing is unethical when it comes to coyotes. imo.
     
  13. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Although a FMJ bullet will kill a coyote,unless it's a heart or head shot it will probably run off before it dies. FMJ ammo just punches holes completely through animals
     
  14. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    A heavy hollow point or a light soft point is what I prefer. The bullets tend to come apart inside them that way and do less fur damage. I try to keep my shots under 300 yds and prefer them inside 200 if I can call them in that close.
     
  15. crockett007

    crockett007 New Member

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    I've killed over 100 coyotes with military 5.56 ball. I've never had one "run away", hit the ground and squirm?... yes...run away no. Of course if you shoot one in the butt or in the guts, the situation may be different.

    I think the comments regarding the carbine are spot on. I use an AR, but I have a bull barrel and a 4 X 16 X 44 Hawke Sidewinder on top. Calling them in under 200 yds. is an acquired skill. I would estimate 90% of my shots are between 200 and 300 yds.

    You might want to get yourself a varmint barreled upper and maybe a Nikon prostaff 3 X 9 with BDC before you take the field
     
  16. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    My brother and I have taken more than one singing dog with his Rem. 700 rifles in .223. We normally use HP bullets with very good results. Here in Ohio, we use bullets that are pretty fragile since farms and homes are around every turn and corner. If a miss occurs, we prefer bullets than will not ricochet as easily and possibly be a safety hazard with all the homes around,, I miss north Ga.,, had some room there, can't spit in this part of the country without seeing a house,,, I never use my other centerfire rifles here even though they are legal for certain varmints, they can just carry much too far for my safety concerns. Even FMJ's have a higher possibility than HP's. Good hunting.