.223/5.56 question

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by longunner, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    I have an AR chambered in 5.56 and I bought a case of 5.56 federal and I shot all of it and now I have a bunch of once fired 5.56 casings. I am looking at getting a remington 700 in .223 and I know the common question can you shoot 5.56 in a .223 chamber and i know you cant. My question is can you use 5.56 brass to reload for .223? I did a bit of searching on other forums and got all kinds of answers, both yes and no. I just want a straight up answer for a straight up question so please if you aren't 100% sure don't put my face my rifle and my life in danger. Thanks in advance for the help
     
  2. Argyle_Armoring

    Argyle_Armoring New Member

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  3. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Longunner, is your brass Boxer or Berdan primered? (1 or 2 flash holes for the primer)
     
  4. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Yes Federal 5.56 can be loaded for use in a .223 bolt action. Work your loads up slow, starting at 10% or more below the loads in the manual at first. Powder capacity of some 5.56 cases can be smaller due to thicker case walls in some instances (not always but it's just a good precaution). After you use the cases in your bolt gun you may consider a neck sizing die as your cases will be fire formed for that chamber and you may get even better accuracy out of them after they are trimmed and reused in the bolt gun on their third firing.
     
  5. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Longunner,

    Doc is absolutely correct! You can use your 5.56 Brass to load for your 223 rifle.
    But you should never shoot military 5.56 ammunition in a rifle chambered for 223 Remington.
    The reason is the 5.56 Military Chamber has more free bore (some call it lead) in the chamber. To simplify this is the distance of the chamber where the casing stops and the riflings begin. And taking in consideration the 5.56 NATO ammunition is also hotter than 223 Remington Ammunition. And the "true" 223 Chamber has less free bore (Lead) in the chamber than the 5.56. So if the 5.56 Military ammunition is fired in a true 223 Remington Chamber the pressure spikes to possible unsafe levels. So with that said and as Doc mentioned, you can use your 5.56 cases with lower powder loads. I would start at the middle of recommended 223 powder charges per the loading manuals.

    03
     
  6. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    I believe it has 2, I'm not at home right now but ill check it out when I get there
     
  7. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    Sweet thanks for the answers guys, good to know it will work out....I have a couple more things to get before I start reloading and I can't wait to get this brass loaded up
     
  8. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    If it has the 2 holes, you wont be able to reload them. They are of Russian?? Design and you could end up bending your De-primer stem on your Die. Visually check all your brass under a bright light to make sure you don't have any of those in the mix or you wll run into problems. The one flash hole in the middle of the bottom will be fine as the others have said to reload.
     
  9. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Longunner,

    Before replacing the new primers you may need a primer pocket reamer. A lot of 5.56 military rounds have the primer pocket crimped.

    03
     
  10. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    I already deprimed and resized them...:eek: it's not steel case and it's federal so I'm assuming its not Russian design??? :confused:
     
  11. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Nope, they are good to go then :)

    I pick up range brass when I am out in the middle of knowhere were we shoot at, and sometimes there is Berdan brass mixed in. Yours are ready to trim, if needed, and load away.
     
  12. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    Sweet! I need a powder throw, bullets, primers, powder and a shell holder for the case trimmer then I'm ready to rock!!
     
  13. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Just for trivia/enlightenment sake. Berdan priming system was developed by Hiram Berdan from New York.
     
  14. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    And Boxer was developed in Europe. Edward Mounier Boxer, of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, England
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2013
  15. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    Back-up and take a look at the primer pockets. Are they crimped? See the ring?

    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...a=X&ei=7OhuUtGdOqOTyQGwhIGYBw&ved=0CDsQ9QEwBg

    If so you need to remove that before inserting a new primer.

    Just to make it clear, 5.56 brass and 223 brass will have identical exterior dimensions once you run them both through your 223 FL sizing die. There is no such thing as 5.56 loading dies, it's all 223.

    It was once thought that 5.56 brass was thicker and had less case capacity than 223 brass. This is not the case and in most instances the 5.56 brass has more case capacity then 223 brass.
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The biggest consideration is case length. 5.56 brass tends to run long before firing. After resizing it will be WAY TOO long. You must trim to length. 1.76" is max. 1.75" is "trim length". If you trim to a uniform length, you will get more consistent crimps and better accuracy.

    700? Pffft. I am working on processing 20,000 pieces of 5.56 at the moment.
     
  17. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    That was what I was getting from most of the other forums that were saying it shouldn't be done.

    I believe They are crimped but here's a pic to make sure:
     

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  18. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    It most certainly can be done and is done all the time.

    If you are going to load 223/5.56 purchase a crimp removal tool. They can be had in many different styles.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/find?sortby=1&itemsperpage=24&newcategorydimensionid=11892

    Removing the crimp only need to be done once, so it's not that big of a deal. Simple, easy and quick.
     
  19. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Anyone who tells you that using 5.56 brass in a .223 is a bad idea is not a very informed loader. They probably have no clue that you can make 8mm Mauser brass from .30-06/.270/.280/.35 Whelen. Many things can be done if done right.

    Remember, when you work up a load using the Lake City brass, it will be a load for THAT brass. Changing ANY component necessitates a new work up
     
  20. CamoToe1

    CamoToe1 New Member

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    For the OP and others on here: is a primer pocket swager really necessary? I have been using my RCBS deburring tool to remove the primer crimp without issues. I'm not saying that it isn't a better tool for the job, but would like to know if it's absolutely necessary. I chuck my deburring tool into a drill when I have a bunch of military brass to prep.

    image-4065292052.jpg

    You can see the slight chamfer put on these three separate military crimped brass. The chamfer removes the crimp and makes priming the cases easier. The one on the right still has the red glue line.
     

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