.22 Marlin 39

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by craiggroves91, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    .22 Marlin 39A

    Hello everyone. I'm new here and have a couple questions about this gun.
    My father just gave me a .22 Marlin 39
    I believe it was my grandfathers and we got it when he passed.

    I have been trying to figure out what it might be worth or what it is.
    I don't really have intentions to sell it quite yet I am just curious.

    It is pretty nice besides some pretty bad rust on the end of the barrel.
    I was also wondering what a good way to get rid of this rust is?

    The serial indicates it is a 1964. Is that right?

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    Now for the rust
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    Last edited: Nov 7, 2011
  2. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    Got the brass magazine tube out.
    It was stuck in there pretty good
    Its in ugly shape though

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    Last edited: Nov 7, 2011

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Have a few of these- learned to shoot using my Dad's Marlin.

    First- that is not a 39- it is a 39A. BIG price difference between those two. Yes, the Y or the Z prefix is 1964.

    Value- priceless. Worth? Due to the rust, it is probably about a $100-$150 rifle. Without the rust, about $400-$450.

    How to get rid of the rust? Well, there is RUSTY- a light even surface film, and RUSTED- where the metal has pitted and bubbled. Unfortunately metal has gone away under the rusted surfaces- getting rid of the rust will not replace the metal there.

    First step- stop the rust from getting worse. A soak in a good penetrating oil. I am partial to a product called KROIL. Penetrating oil on steroids. Wet a cloth with it, wrap surface, let soak for a day or so. You will them need to apply some elbow grease. Find a COPPER pot scrubber, like a Chore Boy- not copper plated. Scrub, wipe with clean cloth, scrub. When arm falls off, switch hands. Keep surface wet with a light oil.

    Bluing under the rust will be gone. I do not usually suggest this, but you can use a good cold blue for touchup. Degrease the metal (alcohol works) warm it (hair dryer, then apply cold blue. Blue Wonder has a good rep as far as cold blues.

    The ultimate cure would be rebarreling it- expect a barrel to run $125-$150. Gunpartscorp DOES have the outer magzaine tube (used) for about $20. Do not attempt self replacment of barrel- needs tools a smith will have, you probably do not.

    The 39A is an EXCELLENT rifle- few others are made like it. machined steel, honest black walnut. GREAT rifles!
     
  4. tCan

    tCan Active Member

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    Some people use a 1 part molasses and 9 or 10 parts water mix to soak and stop rust. Usually, you do a preliminary soak for a couple days, scrub with a light wire brush (probably want to use a scotch pad for a rifle), soak for a week and then scrub again.

    Works every time. Never heard of anyone using it on a rifle though....

    I'd also not sell that rifle if I were you. You'll probably regret it. They are fantastic rifles to begin with and since it's an heirloom, it holds all that much more value to the family.
     
  5. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    You will always be able to see where that rust was. Like c3shooter says use penetrating oil (I often use WD-40 or sometimes just regular oil) and scrub. Mostly I use 0000 steel wool. I don't see any rust that is going to make any functional problem just looks.
     
  6. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Too bad about the rust :(
    Agree with c3 -
     
  7. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    Thanks for the great instructions. Last night I just sprayed it with penetrating oil and scrubbed with a cloth, this didn't do much. I was just curious to see if it would come off easy.

    Will it hurt the value at all to replace the barrel?

    What sucks about the rust is It is stopping me from being able to load the gun. The magazine tube is so rusted around the top knob I can't twist and pull it out.

    Last night I was able to twist it, but I can't slide it out.
     
  8. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Keep trying. The inner tube is brass so it will not rust. Once you get the mag tube out use a .38 or .40 cal brush to clean the inside of the outer mag tube.
     
  9. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    At this point it won't hurt at all - But it'll shoot just as good with the old barrel- Its a shooter, not a collectable
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    This time, I agree with Hossfly. A replacement barrel (NOT a home gunsmithing task for this rifle) is going to be VERY pricy. Get a good penetrating oil (NOT WD 40) on the mag tube, let stand, work it out. You CAN find a replacement outer mag tube over at gunpartscorp.com. But clean out the tube (bore brush, cleaning rod, drill) and clean the inner tube (brasso, cloth. elbow grease) and it should work for you. You rifle is now a shooter- and a very good one, but not a collector's gun.
     
  11. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I don't know why a lot of people are so against WD-40. I've used many brands of penetrating oil and I think Kroil is the best I used. But there is nothing wrong with WD-40 or Liq Wrench or other common brands. I say get off the high horse and use what you find on the work bench. For what this guy is doing he can use regular gun oil. I've removed rust from 100's (yes 100's) of guns. It is not rocket science. I tell someone to use things that they might already have on hand without spending any money. If the WD-40 or oil don't work good then go find some Kroil nothing hurt and only a little time wasted. That bluing is gone. The rust is deep. He's going to end up using emery cloth to smooth it out. Then degrease and cold blue. Take your time and it can turn out to be not even be very noticeable. Changing the barrel would be like buying a new car if you had a flat tire on your old one.
     
  12. tCan

    tCan Active Member

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    Good post Hiwall.
     
  13. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    So when I get this gun in decent shape I shouldn't be afraid to shoot it?

    That would be a blast to shoot such on old gun.
    I think my Grandfather purchased the gun for my Uncle to use when he was young. They are both now passed. My grandpa had this hanging in his computer room until he passed.

    I'm thinking about ordering some bronze wool to try that out.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2011
  14. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    Good news.
    I got the brass tube out of the magazine.

    Bad news.
    It is very ugly and probably shot.
     
  15. tCan

    tCan Active Member

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    How do you mean "shot"? Is it bent? Is the follower within the brass tube stuck?

    You should absolutely spend the time to get this thing in ship shape and shoot it. It's one of if not the most popular .22 rifle ever made. It is the first lever action .22 ever made (Marlin Model 1891) and they've received a few modifications over the decades. The 39, mentioned earlier in the thread, came out in 1921, very minor modifications saw it through to 39A in '37 and then the Golden 39A in '54. They've been making them ever since.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2011
  16. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    Well I suppose it is in working order, but it is just ugly. haha

    Yeah that's what I have been learning. That this is a highly favored gun, even among very experienced shooters.
     
  17. OldSarge1

    OldSarge1 New Member

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    Marlin 39a

    They are truly a beautiful rifle. It's a shame that the pitting and corrosion is so rampant on that weapon. I am working on aquiring one myself of the same vintage as yours. The fact that it is manufactured with forged steel rather than cast from some mystery metal says plenty about it's quality. Your rifle will never be a collector without refurbishing and I'm afraid that would be prohibitively expensive, but I'll bet you stilll have a good shooter.
     
  18. craiggroves91

    craiggroves91 New Member

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    Barrel looks clean. All I did way spray air through it with an air compressor.
    Internal mechanisms look good. Bolt has matching serial (not that it matters too much)
    Tried to take pics of it.
    The magazine tube looks like it is rusted inside fairly bad towards the front of the gun (where all the rust is). I can see what a brush will do, but I imagine Ill need a new one.
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    Last edited: Nov 7, 2011