.22 LR for self defense?

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by pluspforyou38, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. jordan89

    jordan89 New Member

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    There are much better options out there. I would never buy a .22 strictly for self defense. But if that's all that you have its better than nothing.
     

  2. pluspforyou38

    pluspforyou38 New Member

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    i just have a friend who is afraid of recoil but i cant talk him into getting anything bigger. he might budge for a .22 mag but i wonder if they make any decent LR ammo that would give him a better chance
     
  3. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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    opinions? :confused: opinions you ask, we have opinions most of the time we will tell you without the need of asking.....:D and my opinion of a .22 as far as a self-defense weapon goes, there are better choices, but if you have nothing else yeah, but shot placement becomes paramount. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  4. jordan89

    jordan89 New Member

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    With proper technique recoil is almost unnoticed. I can't notice much of a difference between my ruger 22/45 and my smith and wesson model 36 (.38 spl). One problem with the .22 is that it is a rimfire weapon...which tends to make it a little less reliable. Also, the idea of a weapon is to immediately stop a threat. A .22 can and will kill someone ....but it may or may not stop a threat immediately. I would try to get your friend comfortable around firearms . Then maybe he or she will not be afraid if a bigger round.
     
  5. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    With a .22LR you absolutely need to shoot your opponent in the head. Then it works like a charm.

    With a .45 ACP a chest shot is more than sufficient.

    With a 9 mm several chest shots are needed.

    It all depends how cool you are under fire.

    I prefer the .45.
     
  6. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Exactly right. Shot placement ... to the head.
     
  7. Tell_Sackett

    Tell_Sackett New Member

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    If you can get him to go for the 22 mag then hornady is offering their Critical Defense ammo in the 22mag. I would want something bigger but at least these rounds are designed for it.
     
  8. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Why is your friend afraid of recoil? Did they have the unpleasant experience that many have had where they are given a 12 gauge at a young age and got knocked on their butt?

    I suggest that you bring your friend to the range with a variety of guns that have low recoil and have them try them out. I have a Ruger GP100 in .357 magnum that I would use with .38's loaded for this exercise. Very mild recoil and a pretty intimidating gun. (of course any .357 mag heavy revolver would work just as well). I have fired a couple of mildly recoiling 1911s that have been worked over.

    I can imagine that one of those little .22 Derringers might surprise someone. Never fired one myself though.
     
  9. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    100% flawed. For sooo many reasons.


    There's no solid logic to the effectiveness of calibers.

    My detective friend witnessed a man shot 5x center mass with a 45 survive, yet the 22 to the chest was DOA.



    It comes down to this... a 22 is a HORRIBLE cantidate for primary defensive weapon. It honestly sounds like the guy isn't ready to carry at all.

    I'd rather have a pointy stick than a 22 in close quarters.
     
  10. shadamai

    shadamai New Member

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    I have never kept my .22 next to my bed at night. I reserve that spot for my .45. If for some reason I was in a position where I could only get to a .22, it would be better than no gun, but it wouldn't be my first caliber choice for self defense. I would be no match for an intruder with my fists so I will take all the advantage I can get.

    With that said, my humble opinion is that for a self defense handgun, people should get the highest caliber they are able to shoot well and comfortably. So if a .22 is all someone can shoot well, by all means he or she should get one.

    Is your friend afraid because he has shot higher calibers and hated it or afraid because he anticipates unpleasant recoil?
     
  11. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The physical force of recoil is easily managed with proper grip and stance. The psychological aspects from the noise and flash may be harder to manage, depending on the individual. The .22 LR has very little recoil, but significant noise and flash out of a handgun. .38's out of a .357 Mag revolver are a good idea. Ball and dummy practice from that same revolver is very good also.

    While teaching a revolver class many years ago I had a student who was all over the place in the target (if on the target at all). He was closing his eyes as he pulled the trigger. I had him load one round and fire. As soon as the gun went off, I jumped in and very dramatically took the gun and asked if he was hurt. I asked if his ears hurt. I again asked if he needed medical attention, "that looked painful are you sure you are OK?". He assured me he was OK. I replied that if the gun did not hurt him he needed to man up and shoot the damn gun. His patterns became groups.
     
  12. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Explain "ball and dummy practice". Please.
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Put less than a full cylinder full in the gun, slowly squeeze the trigger. If it does not go bang, what does the muzzle do? If the shooter has flinching issues, the muzzle will go crazy when the gun go click.
     
  14. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    OK. Never heard it called "ball and dummy practice." It's good practice though.
     
  15. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    On the .22 caliber question:

    Would you be willing to defend yourself against a 100# hog or a 150# dog using a .22?
    And that is expected to defend you against a 200# bad guy?
     
  16. 007BondJamesBond007

    007BondJamesBond007 New Member

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    How many of you pulled the trigger on a 22lr rimfire and got click? The 22 make a poor SD gun for that reason. In my range "Dud Bucket" you will find at least 5 rounds of 22 no centerfire rounds. John Browing's 25acp was designed for reliable replacement for the 22 rimfire.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.25_ACP

    Centerfire rounds are just more reliable.

    Two sounds that gun owners fear: A click when it should of been a bang, and a bang when it should of been a click.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  17. Flint Rock

    Flint Rock New Member

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    I guess a .22 beats harsh language and screams. I think I would back a .22 up with pepper spray and a tazer.
     
  18. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Of course having a .22LR would better than nothing at all for defense but if I am able to choose my weapon for protection there is no way I would opt for a .22LR handgun. If I ever think I might be in harm's way or encounter a dangerous situation I will be packing my .45 acp, .357 mag or .44 mag. The .44 mag kicks like a mule in my opinion but I shot it and learned how to manage the recoil. We are talking about packing a gun for self defense, which usually means protecting one's well-being or life or that of loved ones. If able to choose a weapon why not go with one that for various reasons is known to be effective?

    Being familiar and proficient with a firearm should always be the first consideration. Simply buying a firearm, any firearm, and calling it good is not wise.
     
  19. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    A 9mm in a double stack works great for recoil. I would suggest a cz75 or xdm 4.5 inch 9mm both are superb very low felt recoil handguns. Fullsize are harder to conceal but doable. The smaller the gun the more unpleasent it is to shoot regardless of caliber. A small palm sized 22lr is more unpleasent than a full size 9mm doublestack.

    Heavier guns also have more reduced felt recoil.

    I would strongly suggest that your friend take a new shooter course that has a range time aspect to it. The worst thing is to buy a gun then spend the next decade doing it wrong. Thats how you end up on youtube with a hole in your leg.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012