20 gauge vs. .410

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by OandB, Aug 16, 2013.

  1. OandB

    OandB New Member

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    So I'm taking my son hunting for the first time (dove) and introducing him to firearms. He knows I have them and has shown an interest. I have a private field to dove hunt so it will be a good chance to teach him about safety without any pressure from other people. My question is what would be a better shotgun for him, 20 gauge or the .410? I have never shoot a .410 so I am ignorant on it. I want him to enjoy it out all the pain of a 12 gauge. So any ideas?
     
  2. natman

    natman Member

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    A 20 ga is vastly superior for wingshooting compared to a 410. The 410 simply doesn't put enough shot in the air. It's the choice of experts who are such good shots that they find larger gauges boring and need the challenge of hitting anything with the 410 to keep interested. Unless your son fits that category, he'd be much better off with a 20, assuming he can handle the recoil.
     

  3. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    Wing shooting go with the 20 gauge..............
     
  4. SRK97

    SRK97 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like the .410 for skeet and squirrels but a 20 ga would probably be better for doves.
     
  5. spottedpony

    spottedpony New Member

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    In addition to whats been said, doves are hard enough to hit with either a 12 or a 20. Why handicap the boy further and possibly have him lose interest because of missing?
    I dont know what the national average for kills per shells fired now is, but at one point i remember reading it was 1 in 5 shells fired. with a 410 i'd bet that number would be much higher.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  6. bntyhntr6975

    bntyhntr6975 New Member

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    Just make sure the 20g has a good recoil pad on it, and avoid the heavy shells. Id also recommend ear plugs. Alot of people have a hard time hittin dove so make sure you miss a few too, so not to make him feel bad. When you take a kid hunting, make sure its about HIM hunting and learning, not about a bird count.
    Theres still time to take him out for some clay pigeons also. Great way for him to learn a shotgun, and to figure out what'll work for him.
     
  7. Tjurgensen

    Tjurgensen New Member

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    Yes its not fair for your boy to be trying to hit a dove with a 410. He might as well be throwing rocks in the air.

    As for what's said about the recoil just teach him how to mount and shoulder the gun properly show him a good stance and emphasize on leaning forward into it and depending on how big he is, he should be fine. Just make sure he keeps the good habits.

    It's great your bringing another hunter into the sport. It's always fun to see kids in the field. Good luck!

    ~TJ
     
  8. TheDesertFox

    TheDesertFox New Member

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    The only thing I would use a .410 for is blasting unwanted varmints in the night.
     
  9. trip

    trip New Member

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    Spot on advice!
     
  10. LIBERTY2

    LIBERTY2 New Member

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    Definitely the 20 guage!!! 410's are for experts not for young or old men just starting out. Another thing that was mentioned by another is hearing protection. Please don't start your son off to a life of poor hearing by not protecting his ears. My favorite word is HUH or say what its no way to live and it because of the lack of ear protection in my formative years!! FRJ
     
  11. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    I got my start in shotgun hunting with a 12 gauge and a big fat recoil pad. So I'd go with a MINIMUM of 20 guage. Never a 410
     
  12. toddchaney

    toddchaney New Member

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    The 20 gauge is going to be your best choice.
     
  13. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    Depends on the shooter. My wife while not afeert of recoil leaned more shooting a 410. Wit hher I have found that she does best when I start her smaller and work up. My daughter was the same way. If I skipped a step form smaller up she would not do as well. But I did have her shooting a 12 gauge by 11 and she was a small (thin) kid. With my daughter the recoil caused a flinch unless I started small ad worked up.

    But like I said we're are all different. So results vary.:)