1st Revolver - .357 vs .22 L.R. Recoil Difference?

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by bf109, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. bf109

    bf109 New Member

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    Hi, we just completed our pistol permit class and shot .22 l.r. revolver and semi-auto in the class. Both I and my wife did well with the .22 l.r. Now we're thinking of getting our first revolver for target practicing and personal protection. My wife has very small hands and never shot anything bigger than a .22 l.r.

    FYI, I already bought a .22 l.r. bolt action rifle. Does it make sense to get a revolver in .22 l.r. for practicing? Is .22 l.r. too small a caliber for personal/home protection?

    We never shot a .357 revolver but think its recoil and noise are much more than a .22 l.r. revolver. Shall we just skip the .22 l.r. revolver and get the .357 mag (which can shoot both .357 for home protection and .38 for practicing)?

    The price tag for a .22 l.r. revolver is about the same as the .357. Can you recommend a few decent/high quality manufactures and models for carry-on? I prefer those that can shoot in both single & double action modes.

    S&W, Ruger, Taurus, Rossi. Any others?

    Thanks.
     
  2. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I wouldn't want to count on a .22LR for self defense, but it is certainly better than nothing. I have been very happy with my Ruger GP100 .357/.38spcl revolver. The one i purchased has a 6" barrel that tames a good bit of the recoil. You should try to find a range that will let you try out a few different revolvers in different calibers and using different ammunition.

    I would rather have a 4" GP100 loaded with .38 hollow points than a .22LR in a self defense situation.
     

  3. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    As 'gello said, a .22 is better than nothing but is woefully inadequate for self defense duties. As far as revolvers, I'd stick with S&W or Ruger - yes they are more expensive but you do get a quality piece of hardware. I've just seen way to many Taurii (includes Rossi) revolvers with serious problems...
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    IF you want a .22 handgun, would suggest you look at the Ruger semiauto. However, while a .22 may be better than a pointy stick for defense, it simply does not have stopping power.

    A .357 will have considerably more recoil than a .22- not a wrist breaker, but not is the same class as a .22. The heavier the gun, the less the recoil. A set of rubber grips, such as Hogue or Pachmayr can help tame felt recoil. As you know, 357 can also fire .38 Special- and .38 wadcutter is a mild target load for practice. A good .38 Special hollowpoint (Golden Saber, Gold Dot, Hornady Self Defense) have a reasonable amount of authority.

    If both you and your lady learn to shoot properly- (two handed, balanced stance) unless you are elves you should be able to learn to manage .357 recoil- but do not start the lady with a light, short 357 that is going to hurt/scare her- been a lot of potential shooters soured by a crappy first experience. PS- my 14 yr of granddaughter shoots my 1911A1 .45- but it was not her FIRST gun.

    In revolvers, would stick to S&W. Ruger as a second choice. Taurus and Rossi have simply had too many quality "issues".

    With ANY gun, get some ear and eye protection for practice. Or you will be an old man going around saying "Huh?" a whole lot. Ask me how I know that.
     
  5. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Seconded! I really enjoy shooting the 6" Ruger in .357 or using .38's, but i have never particularly enjoyed shooting the old snubnose .38 Granny gave me. The lil snubby doesn't have enough grip to get comfortable for my mitts, and the noise and kick are enough to be seriously annoying if you need to fire more than a couple of rounds.
     
  6. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    I will jump in here and give a thumbs up to the Ruger SP101. I had a j-frame 36 and I could not shoot it that well. The SP101 is much easier to control and even shooting .357 loads is not to bad...
     
  7. bf109

    bf109 New Member

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    Which S&W or Ruger revolver for carry-on?

    Hi guys, thanks so much for your feedbacks. While a 4" to 6" barrel revolver is easy to shoot with less recoil, what would be a good carry-on size revolver?

    As you know, a brand new S&W will run $600-$900 depending on the model and it costs as much as a quality semi-auto carry-on.

    Meanwhile, for practice purpose, we may get a .22 l.r. Ruger semi-auto (around $350). Anythings similar in revolvers?

    Thanks.
     
  8. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    Sadly, there are no good cheap DA .22 revolvers. A S&W 617 will set you back around $700 and it's a great gun - I love mine...

    [​IMG]
     
  9. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    Is there a reason you want a revolver over a semi-automatic? Don't get me wrong, I love revolvers, and I even carry my S&W 586 on occasion. But in reading your original post, I wondered whether you were looking at a revolver because that is what you shot in your class.

    Your idea about a .22 is a sound one. The .22 platform is great for learning at first and later for cheap trigger time. I take a .22 with me on every range trip. Good .22 double-action revolvers, however, are not cheap; they'll set you back as much as a good defense gun.

    You may be perfectly happy with a .22 of one style and a defense gun of another (i.e., .22 auto and .357 revolver). Some people prefer to have two guns that are as nearly identical as possible, even going so far as to purchase a .22 conversion kit for their favorite defense gun so they are literally practicing with the same trigger all the time.

    Your reasons for the gun(s) you choose are your own. But if you are choosing a revolver only because you haven't been exposed to anything else, I suggest you look at a lot of guns and fire as many as you can before you decide. You may also find a need to get your wife her own gun.

    Happy shopping and happy shooting!
     
  10. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have an SP101 2" with bobbed hammer. It weighs in at 25 oz empty. With 125 gr 38 spl +P it is fairly easy to shoot. Mine has a lightened trigger but it is still a little to heavy a pull for my wife. She can shoot it but likes the Glock 19 better. The recoil does not bother her. A revolver with a hammer can be cocked and shot single action but that is slow even using the off hand thumb for cocking. The Ruger LCR in 357 is a little heavier than the 38 spl model and will have a little less recoil using the 38 spl loads. The SP101 is also available in a 3" barrel. The LCR and SP101 would be easier to conceal than a 4" or 6" revolver.
    You might want to look at some of the compact 9mm semi auto pistols. There are quite a few to choose from. I have been looking at the Ruger SR9C.
     
  11. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I'm sorry but I don't think the 22 is even in the same league as a 38 and certainly not a 357.
    I taught my wife to shoot with a 6" 38 and now her bedroom gun is an SP101, still shooting 38s. Both of those guns were chambers for 357 but she shoots 38s. I think you're in the right market in with the 357 but don't expect to be shooting magnums right off. The jump to that from a 22 is a big one.
     
  12. bf109

    bf109 New Member

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    Thanks for all your feedbacks.

    I'd like to get a revolver but don't have to. For home and personal protection, we want to get one that is relatively small in size. Better yet, it can be carried on in a holster. We may then get 2 guns - one .22 l.r. for practice and one .357 for personal protection.

    For the .22 l.r., I would look at semi-auto such as a Ruger, Browning, or SIG Sauer with .22 l.r. conversion kit. But the SIG conversion kit itself runs around $400. Not sure if it's worth the investment. Or, just get a separate
    .22 l.r. pistol. So many options out there.
     
  13. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I am a female in my mid 50's and I don't have the strength in my hands that I used to when I was younger. I have a Ruger GP100, 6" barrel and I can handle the recoil just fine. I am not a very experienced shooter and this is my first and only gun I own. I highly recommend it. It's fun to shoot at the range and I know it would do a good job of protecting should I ever need tit to do that. In my opinion, and again I am not very experienced, if you could only own one gun, the GP100 might just be the perfect gun for target and home use.
     
  14. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    +1 on the S&W 617. They cost twice as much as a Ruger MKIII or Browning Buckmark (the most recommended semi .22's around here), but they are the gold standard of .22 revolvers. My S&W 17 is the precursor to the 617. I can't say enough good things about this gun. .22 firearms are notoriously finicky about the ammo you feed them, due to the relative inconsistencies in the ammo. For some reasons, it's just difficult to stay consistent when making the .22lr round. But my S&W 17 will eat everything you put into it.

    The .22lr is not a good defense round. If you want to stick to revolvers, the go-to choice is the .357. For a concealable .357, I'd recommend the Ruger SP101. That is about as light a gun as I'd possibly go and still fire .357 rounds out of it. There are lighter ones out there, but you will pay for it with a heck of a recoil. If you aren't as concerned about concealing, the Ruger GP100 is just an all-round excellent shooter. Much easier to shoot magnums out of that gun than the smaller, lighter revolvers. Whichever you decide, stick with Ruger and S&W for revolvers.

    There is a secondary choice of defensive revolver that seems to be making some headway, the .327 magnum. I haven't had a chance to try one yet, but the ballistics look fantastic, and they are supposed to have much less recoil than the .357. But the ammo is not common yet, which means more expensive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2010
  15. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Absolutely. To a new shooter, the difference between a .22 and a .357 can be shocking to say the least.
     
  16. magnumman

    magnumman New Member

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    for a small framed 357 your best bet is a s&w. that said, a new taurus revolver is a very reliable and straight shooting gun with a lifetime guarentee, and you can get 2 for the price of a smith and wesson. they make some very nice carry guns as well. i think everyone should own a .22lr handgun of somesort for practice. personally i like revolvers so thats what mine is. I have guns of all types and my .22 is used more than all the rest combined. when i go to the range i typically take 2 guns. the first is one that i recently bought and am trying to master or one that i havent shot in a while. the second is my .22 which i usually shoot a couple hundred rounds through before i go home.
     
  17. freefall

    freefall New Member

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    i have a 4" Taurus Model 94 .22 revolver that is light, accurate, a joy to shoot and carry. For anyone looking for a revolver to practice with I would not hesitate to recommend it. I would not care to have to rely on it in a serious social situation. I would hope to be carrying my 4" Ruger Security Six. It's powerful, light, accurate, a joy to shoot and carry. That being said, I'll probably be armed with my KelTec PF9. It's fairly powerful, light, fairly accurate, a joy to carry. If I have to shoot I'll be wishing I had my Security Six. It's just fatter.:(
     
  18. misterballistic

    misterballistic New Member

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    Recoil of a .22LR = like dropping a rock on your foot.

    Recoil of a .357 Magnum = like dropping a brick on your foot...make it a big pile of bricks!