1st gun for mom of 5 boys, protection &target

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by BelRockRebel, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. BelRockRebel

    BelRockRebel New Member

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    Researching 1st gun for myself for home & personal protection, (not conceal though...live in Illinois) Also will do target shooting with my sons. Never shot anything other than shotguns. Hubby travels, protection important, but want to shoot for hobby too. Boys ages 6, 7, 9, 13, 15. Suggestions? 1911 appealing.
     
  2. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    First, congratulations for wanting to be able to protect yourself and your family. A 1911 is a great pistol although some will say that it's not a good "first" handgun. See if you can shoot one or several and see how it feels. You can get a good basic 1911 for around $500. more or less.

    A four inch .357 revolver is also a good bet. You can shoot .38's for practice and keep it loaded with .357's for defense. Thirty-eight ammunition is also less expensive than .45ACP.

    A nine millimeter pistol is also something to consider. Ammo is pretty cheap, it recoils less than a .45 or a .357 and is quite effective for defense with good quality ammunition.

    Whichever way you may go, see if you can shoot as many handguns as possible before making a decision.

    Do you have a set budget? Can you elaborate a bit on your likes and dislikes? If so, we can better make recommendations.

    Oh, and welcome.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011

  3. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My suggestion to you would be take a NRA Basic Pistol Class. There are sure to be some in your area. You can search the NRA website to find one near you.

    In this class you will learn a great deal about firearm safety, storage, cleaning, ammunition and basic pistol shooting skills. You will probably be able to shoot many different firearms. You will be much better informed on what to buy after such a class. It might save you from buying a firearm that just doesn't fit your requirements.

    If you have more than one class available where you live, talk to the instructors before commiting to find one who's philosophy fits your personality. Better yet, ask for references, preferably women, from previous classes.
     
  4. BelRockRebel

    BelRockRebel New Member

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    Wow. Thanks for replying so fast!

    Budget is negotiable. Considering buying two guns so that I can take my boys and/ or my husband to the range with me. Handled my Dads 9mm Glock, did not shoot it, but I did not like all the plastic, felt too light, and when the slide was removed it felt like a toy. I definately would like something a little more substantial than the feel of that. I do plan on going to our range to try different models. Being a newbie I just need a place to start. In my mind, I think I would love a 1911, pretty sure I could handle a .45. I plan on taking up target shooting for fun and will probably go to the range 2x week. .45 ammo cost is not appealing though. I really want to hone my marksmanship skills and to do that I assume I will go through lots of ammo.

    So... I want a gun with as little plastic as possible, I want to feel some weight, I NEED to be able to drop someone should they threaten my sons, I want to learn how to shoot well at the range and maybe even compete. I am slightly embarrassed to say I want the gun to look intimidating in a pretty way. Love silver, not black.

    Being somewhat obsessive about this, I do plan on learning that gun inside and out. I will know how to DCOA, and I Wool learn about the acceptable ammo.

    I will put whatever time, research,and practice I need, in order to become proficient with a gun that might typically be too much for a woman, keeping in mind that my sons will be able to shoot it as well.
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Belrock, welcome to the forum. When you get a minute, stop by the intro thread and say howdy. We do have some other ladies that keep us scruffy types in order, and lend a little class to things here. We sometimes get a little goofy, but all in good fun.

    A 1911A1 is an excellent handgun- IF you can shoot one. It DOES take a degree of upper body strength to rack the slide to load one. And it DOES take practice to use one in a defensive situation when adrenalin is high.

    A well made double action revolver, such as the 357 mentioned above, is accurate, plenty of power, may require less strength to put into action, has slightly cheaper ammo, and is easy to secure (open cylinder, snap a padlock thru the frame). Simplicity of use in an emegency in a strong plus.

    For a fun plinker, hard to beat the Ruger .22 pistols. Little recoil, as accurate as you are, cheap ammo. Besides the Mark 1,2, and 3, there is a Ruger 22 that has similar grip angles, etc to a 1911.

    As already suggested, DO avail yourself of some good training, try as many guns as you can, take your time picking what you like. Do not overlook a basic .22 rifle- inexpensive, cheap ammo, and those young'uns may like shooting with Mom.

    As far as the being in Illinois part, really sorry to hear that. Can we help you find a good Realtor in a free state, and truck rental? :)
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Revolvers. Such as Smith & Wesson, Colt, Ruger, Dan Wesson, etc. This is a S&W Mdl 65 .357 Magnum revolver.

    s&w mdl 65.jpg
     
  7. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Hello, Bel. I am female and new to guns. My first gun was a Ruger GP100 in stainless, 6" barrel. It shoots both .38 and .357 Magnums. In my opinion, a revolver is a good first gun as it is simple to check to see if it's empty. No fear of 'forgetting' there might be one loaded in the chamber when you remove the magazine from a semi-auto. Revolvers almost never, ever jam. Revolvers are easy to clean, no need to ever take them apart. I think revolvers are beautiful and the 'classic' look of a gun.

    Tell me this isn't beautiful. :D

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    You have come to the right place for learning about guns. I have asked uncountable numbers of questions here and have always been answered with patience and knowledge and a variety of opinions and points of view to consider.

    I live in Illinois, too. My gun is too big for conceal carry, anyway, but I guarantee you she is an intimidating gun. She's a big 'un!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011
  8. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Well, if you're considering two, let me throw another suggestion in. My second gun was a .22 semi-auto. VERY fun to shoot, very cheap to shoot, too. You can get lots of practice with a .22 for cheap. A .22 pistol would be a great gun for your boys to shoot, too. Very little recoil and ammo is cheap so everyone could shoot all day long. I dressed mine up a little, too. I have a lot of fun with this one at the range.

    [​IMG]

    My saying is "I have two guns. One is for business, one is for pleasure." :D
     
  9. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    It sounds like you need two guns:

    1) A rimfire target pistol. Ruger 22/45, Ruger MKIII, and Browning Buckmark are best bang for your buck. These will run you $250-500 depending on how decked out you want it. They're excellent target pistols, affordable to shoot, and great for training the youngsters. A good rimfire can quickly transform an $80 trip to the range into a $20 trip.

    2) Centerfire home defense pistol. Best bang for your buck options for beginners in various categories might be:
    • 357revolver 4-6": Ruger GP100 ($550)
    • 9mm semiauto: CZ 75b ($550)
    • 1911 45acp: Various guns in the $750 range, maybe Springer Milspec

    PS: You should start a boy-band.
     
  10. murraywc

    murraywc New Member

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    If you've shot shotguns before they are actually the best imo for home defence less need to be accurate
     
  11. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  12. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Get the two guns.

    #1 Take a NRA class if you haven't yet.

    #2 Buy a .22. Everyone needs a .22. It's probably the one rule everyone on this forum can agree upon. Ruger and Browning make great .22 semi-autos. Smith & Wesson and Ruger make great .22 revolvers. You can shoot .22's all day long, 7 days a week, and you bank account won't blink an eye.

    #3 Buy a 9mm, .357, .40, or .45 for home protection. There are more choices than I could list for that group.
     
  13. kobel1up

    kobel1up New Member

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    I agree with everyone here about the NRA class, that is something everyone needs to take and retake every so many years.

    Now 1911's look intimidating and are a wonderful gun to shoot. Are they great for a first gun, that is up to how confident you are in yourself. Your ability to deal with a gun that can be a pain to take apart, but nothing feels better in your hand then a steel frame. One option is a 9mm 1911, you have a great round for target shooting and with the right ammo it is good for defense. I prefer a gun with a hammer and safety, now that is just me. For a target gun you can find many 1911 frame 22 guns and you can also buy a 22 conversion for your 9mm 1911. ( yes I love 1911's).
    Now Glocks are great and very reliable, they do feel plastic and I worried about if it was loaded all the time. I have owned 7 of them and do recommend then if you want a low maintenance gun. You can buy a 40 cal and then a 357 sig barrel for home defense. That will cost you 125 for the extra barrel. The reason I say get the 40 cal is that you can change the barrel to a 9mm or a 357 sig, I am not sure if the 9mm glock can be changed to any other barrel. Someone else can answer that.
    As far as revolvers go, their pros, easy to clean, you can check to see if loaded and very reliable. Cons long trigger pull and only 6 rounds.
    Just continue to do research and shoot as many guns as you can. The unfortunate thing about rental guns is, they are abused most of the time. So my advice find something that feels good in your hand and that you can control. When you buy it new it should preform way better.
     
  14. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would suggest that any of you that think you dont have to be accurate with a shotgun, pattern your shotgun at 7 yards with your defense load.
    A tactical/short barreled shotgun is a good home defense weapon and will have less wall penetration with proper loads. You dont want bullets going through walls and into the kids rooms. You will need a defense plan to keep the family safe. You will have to know where you can and cant shoot. You will need to know who is in the house and get them to a safe zone if there is trouble.
    Pistols are handier but the shotgun is more intimidating. A carbine takes less training and is also more intimidating. I am not trying to discourage you from getting handguns. Personally I would not like to be in front of any gun but there are some aspects of home defense you need to consider.
    There is nothing wrong with the 1911 in 45ACP. My wife has shot a light weight compact with no problem and she is small. However we have gotten older and recoil is harder for her to handle. She now shoots a 9mm. I still like the 45. and have a Glock and and XD in 45. It is a good idea to get a 22lr to go along with it. The Browning Buckmark has a solid reputation and is reasonably priced. The Rugers are very good also but a little harder to assemble.
    While it is still a polymer frame, the Springfield XD series are very reliable and weigh about 8 oz more than the Glocks. For me, they have better ergonomics and are easier to shoot accurately.
     
  15. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Very good point, indeed, and something to always remember and think about.
     
  16. firedawg60

    firedawg60 New Member

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    I have to echo what a lot are saying on here. A shotgun would make a good HD weapon. Revolvers are a good HD also. Yes you only have 6 rounds, but hopefully you won't need more than that. Easy to maintain and very reliable. I have a S&W 586 that I use for HD and will throw in my CC rotation.

    Don't throw Glocks out early. I have 2 and really enjoy them. Very easy to maintain and I haven't really had any issues with mine. I normally carry a G-23 as my primary. And I know, they're plastic and light and blah, blah blah!!

    As you stated, I would go to a range that rents different weapons. Find one that fits you and your budget. And shoot different calibers. Don't let some gunshop guy try to talk you into something you don't want. A lot of people will look at a woman and tell them they need a 9 mm or something small. I've seen a lot of women handle a .45 better than a lot of guys. Do your research and "test drive" a few. Get what YOU want. Good luck!
     
  17. BlackWidow

    BlackWidow New Member

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    If the boys are gonna learn to shoot, you need a .22. You should get a .22 similar in size, weight, and function to your HD handgun.

    My choice would be a Ruger SP101 in .22lr and another in .357 Magnum. About $450 each.
     
  18. First Sgt

    First Sgt New Member

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    I recommend you go to Cornered Cat and research that site thoroughly. I am concerned about your misconceptions on "plastic guns". Research the Glock 19...It is one of, if not the most, dependable 9mm handguns on the market. Weight of a weapon does not equate to dependability nor accuracy nor stopping ability. Looks of a weapon do not equate to ability to use in a self defense situation. Intimidation is acquired through knowledge, training, mindset, skills, and then gear. One can have a "heavy" and "pretty" weapon and be skilled at punching holes in paper targets and not have a clue as to how to handle themselves under stress and to function in a self defense situation. I applaud your sincere desire to acquire the knowledge and skills to defend yourself and your family, and also to integrate your sons into the picture as well. All I'm saying is, take a step back, reconsider some of the "preconceived" notions you have expressed, do a little more research, try some different weapons out, to include "plastic" guns, and then make your choices. Remember, the weapon you choose and train with is what YOU will bet YOUR life on...Choose well. Good luck, stay safe, and TRAIN with a REPUTABLE trainer and then TRAIN some more with a DIFFERENT REPUTABLE trainer...JMO
     
  19. kystang90

    kystang90 New Member

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    If you are in the 1911 market id look into a RIA 1911 9mm and for a 2nd gun there are several good 1911-22 out there from chiappa,gsg,sig and many other companies for reasonable money. You could get both these guns for under $900