1911 while camping/hiking?

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by DynoGuy, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. DynoGuy

    DynoGuy New Member

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    So who has had to actually use your 1911 to protect yourself while out in the woods? I go prospecting, camping/hiking by myself. I do go out west sometimes and while out there been told about the possibility of big cats or bears. Just wondering how the 45acp performed. If i ever get to go to AK I'll get a 44mag but for the lower 48 i think the 45 should be good.
     
  2. MaineMan

    MaineMan New Member

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    the 45ACP is fine for that purpose...The round was selected in part because it could easily bring down a horse...Black Bears are not much of a threat, and a 45 ACP will deal with that if needed...I carry a 1911 when bear hunting in a ground blind
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I remember a news story of a guy that was attacked by a grizzly. It said that he emptied his 1911 at it. It did bring the grizzly down. The guy lived to talk about it. He did empty the gun. But they did not say how many time he actually hit it.
     
  4. MaineMan

    MaineMan New Member

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    There was a guy a few years ago that made the news because he killed a grizzly with his 1911, seems they thought he was unjust in his shooting, not sure how it turned out
     
  5. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I have carried one of mine. Haven't HAD to use it. Carry a Glock sometimes. Most times I make sure I have a .22. I have used .22s on several occasions on snakes, squirrels and rabbits.
     
  6. duddie10

    duddie10 New Member

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    Yah i hear those rabbits hunt in packs. Draged a hiken buddy clean off before i knew what was going on. ;-)

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Firearms Talk mobile app
     
  7. DynoGuy

    DynoGuy New Member

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    You mean like the ones in the Lone Ranger movie.;)
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Used my 1911 against a giant assed spider.

    I honestly think I'd pick something with a bit more punch and "oomph" to get the job done on a bear or mountain lion. But, if the 1911 is all you have (like me), I wouldn't feel undergunned. But, I'd be careful where I'm going. Surely you're paying attention anyway.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Old Army friend (sucker retired as a Brigadier!) and I used to take our sons on weekend hikes on the Appalachian Trail. We each had a 1911 in the side pocket of our rucks.

    We were not concerned about bears or cats. They are not the dangerous predator that is out there. The .45 works just fine on the dangerous ones.
     
  10. MaineMan

    MaineMan New Member

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    the bears and cats will shy away from you...human predators may not
     
  11. duddie10

    duddie10 New Member

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    Hahahahaa yup!!! Damn things are crazy

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Firearms Talk mobile app
     
  12. DynoGuy

    DynoGuy New Member

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    I honestly can say that when I'm hiking yes I'm aware but he problem comes when I'm in a creek bed prospecting that I become less aware of the surrounding. One time I was in Lynx Creek (Prescott, AZ) prospecting and had that funny felling something was watching me, never seen anything, but did come across a cat track the next day in a different part of the creek (I only had my Bowie knife with me as I flew out for work and had sometime between jobs to go out & camp mid week). BTW I traded my Taurus Model 44 (8 3/8" ported barrel) to get my Para full size 1911. If it was a 6" barrel I'd have kept it for just such times.
     
  13. MaineMan

    MaineMan New Member

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    Bears, Cats, and A$$holes all will fall when hit by the 45 :)
     
  14. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    The .460 Rowland may be a reasonable choice. In most Grizz attacks it will be over before you know what has happened. The Mtn. Lion killls its prey very fast. There was a teen age boy killed below my place a few years back. His body has never been found. Most handgun shots in these attacks are fired at point blank range. The slide on a semi-auto could be jammed when you are being "Hugged" to death by a Grizz. The .44 Mag. revolvers have proven records in these attacks. :)
     
  15. MaineMan

    MaineMan New Member

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    If your not in Grizzly country I would feel very well armed with my 1911...my Franco American friend up here in Maine has been hunting Black Bear all his life with a bow, he carries a Ruger 40cal pistol with him. He had a young Bear climb the tree and start growling at him once, killed it with his Ruger.

    He also told me a story about a guide he had in Canada that was mulled by an injured Black bear. The bear charged at him from the brush, he got one shot off with his rifle, the bear got a hold of him and about killed him before it died. The guide got a decent shot on the bear in the vitals but it didn't stop him right away.

    I didn't have any luck hunting Bear this year, it was my first year and I'm still learning the ropes. I didn't even see one after feeding them donuts for a month. Black bears are normally very shy and avoid human contact unless they are sick or something. I assume the same for cats, but I have heard of some cat attacks out west.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  16. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Humm? I suppose in the more populated Eastern states game is more shy of humans. Bears are commonly encountered in much of the intermountian west and some Southern States. The Lions are mostly nocturnal as are bears. Lions tend to hunt in pairs. You can kill a bear with a .22 rifle. The question posed here what will you need to quickly end an attack. Shooting treed animals is a whole different thing. When you are the treed animal seconds count. :eek:
     
  17. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    All of your "Eastern State" comments are becoming kinda boring. Although Maine IS an eastern state, you've called me an Eastern Big City Dweller, and I live in rural (sometimes referred to as BFE) Louisiana, which makes me in particular something OTHER than a "Big Eastern City Dweller". So that COULD be understandable in context since I AM east of Wyoming... until I've seen you also call rural residents of Arizona, Texas, and Colorado "Big Eastern City Dwellers".

    Your little superiority complex, coupled with your assumptions about people's lifestyles is a bit annoying. You're on the INTERNET, most of each day, browsing this site at least as much as I am. I promise you, you're no more "grizzly Adams" mountain man than I am, enjoying the small comforts and luxuries of modern technology.

    I won't doubt any of what you say about your personal experiences in hunting and shooting. But you need to figure out, no one here is "less" than you because they don't live in the same place as you. You wanna talk big about your region, but just as I would find it hard to survive there, I'd like to see how "MAN" you are trying to make it in my bayou.

    High horses and such...
     
  18. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Calm down. If you don't like my post hit the ignore button. Your non-gun or hunting post regarding your personal life is not the most interesting read. I post things as I see them. All of those "Snarky" comments about anyone not living in the south being ignorant "Yankees" is also distasteful to many members. Have a nice day on the Bayou. :)
     
  19. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Exactly what I'm talking about. I don't hunt, therefore don't talk much about it, other than in reference to my LONG past unsuccessful hunting experiences in the context of pointing out to new hunters that they shouldn't necessarily expect to fill their limit on opening day. And I don't think I've ever used the words "ignorant" or "yankee" here, certainly not one in reference to the other, and especially not directed towards you. My phone doesn't even recognize yankee as a word. Autocorrect is trying desperately to convince me to change it to "tanker".

    And to boot, I don't think I've ever made a "snarky" comment on ANYONE'S lifestyle or personal experiences based on where they live. Much unlike yourself. I have, however, urged people to move away from such states as California, New York, and Illinois. Not because those states make them less of a man than myself, or ignorant tankers (yankees), but because they were complaining about the politics, and unfortunately, are seemingly outnumbered at the polls.

    Nope, wait... I ask Kaido for some "real" maple syrup every time I think about it. And ya know, that dang canuck still ain't hooked me up, eh? I still think he was the mastermind behind the massive theft from the Canadian emergency reserves of maple syrup a while back.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  20. MaineMan

    MaineMan New Member

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    Here is a little information about Maine Nitestalker. Maine is NOT a populated eastern state, and I live in the sticks.

    Maine is the least densely populated U.S. state east of the Mississippi River. It is called the Pine Tree State; nearly 90% of its land is forested.[9] In the forested areas of the interior lie much uninhabited land, some of which does not have formal political organization into local units (a rarity in New England). The Northwest Aroostook, Maine unorganized territory in the northern part of the state, for example, has an area of 2,668 square miles (6,910 km2) and a population of 10, or one person for every 267 square miles (690 km2).