1911 Gunsmithing books

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by trip286, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Okay, so after my recent foray into the world of trying to track down parts locally...

    I've decided that, although I may not (likely won't) make a career out of it, I would like to learn more about smithing the 1911. This is something I expect will help me in the long run, because I plan on doing all my own work, and one day, I would like to own a 1911 collection as extensive and impressive as other's here.

    Any good books to start with?

    I'm thinking the Kunhausen (sp?) shop manuals. Anyone familiar with them?
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  2. deadsp0t

    deadsp0t New Member

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    Interested for my own use as well, *subscribed*
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Cool. If I had to guess from your avatar, we would like the same books.
     
  4. deadsp0t

    deadsp0t New Member

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    Actually finishing my third time through the series, this being the 1st time I had 'Wind through the keyhole' to go between books 4-5
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I read through it twice and read the one your on too, then picked and chose a couple. I also HAD to read several that were referenced in the series, hearts of Atlantis, from a Buick 8, and insomnia. So many of his books reference each other.
     
  6. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    those are good books. i have seen them, and really need a set of my own.

    both of you need to check out Brownell's and MidwayUSA. both carry a lot of books on the 1911's. Brownell's has a very extensive collection of them, from basic cleaning and maintenance to full on modifications.
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I've been anxiously awaiting their 1911 catalog...
     
  8. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i need to get a new one myself. that and the huge catalog as well.
     
  9. NotMormon

    NotMormon Member

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    Kuhnhausen shop manuals may be all that YOU will need. There is also an Ed Brown publication on customization that has been recomended to me numerous times but I have not induldged yet. As I'm sure you already know, prepare to invest some cash if you are serious about it. Hopefully you have access/knowhow in machine work as you can make some of the jigs/necessities without feeling like a prison play toy. I'm just starting the fun myself.:)
     
  10. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I would start small and work myself up. Things I could do cheap, quick, and easy, like mostly parts replacement. But, some parts need a little handfitting occasionally, and I would like a better understanding of how they interact so that I could do the best I could. Again, I wouldn't be looking at going into business doing it, at least not right away. That would be something like a 5 or 10 year goal.

    I'm actually pretty good with handfiles and stones. Did some revolver work on my own gun and for a local cop in my old town (he had me do some action work on his S&W model 36), and I learned it all from Larry Potterfield's youtube videos ;)
     
  11. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    I'm kinda like Denzel in "The Book Of Eli" -
    Its all in my head :p