1911 complete build kit?

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by JustinM, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. JustinM

    JustinM New Member

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    I really want to find a reasonably priced build kit for a 1911. Anybody know of one?
     
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    That is what is called an oxymoron.
    "Reasonably priced" and "build kit for a 1911".

    Scrounge and you can find kits to build a 1911 from, but most are missing the frame, the parts may or may not fit, the quality of the included parts is normally questionable.

    You need tools that you are will use once if things are not properly fitted before you purchase the kit.

    Are you well informed on the fit and function of the 1911? Can you tell if a part is in spec by looking at it? If not, the you have to purchase some books that have part specs and can introduce you to the 1911.

    The best thing is to purchase a complete, reasonable priced 1911 that works. Then start adding your aftermarket parts.
     

  3. JustinM

    JustinM New Member

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    Ill probably do that then. Thanks.
     
  4. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Buy an entry level gun like the RIA and make it yours.

    Building a 1911 pattern pistol from scratch isn't for the faint of heart. (Unless you have deep pockets.)
     
  5. pagj17

    pagj17 New Member

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    Yeah but you can't fit a 460 to a RIA:(
     
  6. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    A freind of mine has built a couple of different 1911s from "kits."
    There are several obstacles.
    Quality of typical "reasonably priced" kits. Cheap 1911 parts are a false economy. At the end of it all, My friend ended up with several items that were crappy enough to require replacement with better parts.
    Skill. slapping a 1911 together out of a bag of parts is not conducive to a satisfactory pistol. Heck it might even work ok. But then if you are serious, you need to have a bit of skill with precision machine work. If in doubt about the required skills, order a copy of "The Colt .45 automatic, A shop Manual, by Jerry Kuhnhausen" If you can read through it and come away with a feeling of confidence, you're ahead of me.
    Equipment. Access to a few machine tools will make life a lot simpler. Oh, and lets not forget the 1911 specific tools/jigs that you will need at some point.
    Whatever you can't do yourself has to be sent out to someone, very likely at full shop rates. $50 here, $100 there, pretty soon, your talking real money.
    At the end of it all, my friend came away spending nearly as much as he would have for a high quality finished gun. This was in in spite getting frames (Essex) and slides (Colt) at closeout prices.

    Good or bad, the 1911 is a 100+ year old design. As such each one will require a degree of skilled hand fitting and tuning for it function correctly. It's much more than tossing parts at a Glock.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    building a quality and properly functioning 1911 from scratch is not for the novice. if you were only building one and purchased the part to build it and the proper 1911 tools needed, you could have bought a couple of really, really nice 1911's ready to shoot right out of the box.

    there is a certain mystery tied to the 1911's and they are one on my favorite platforms of pistols. after many years of researching this same question, i did as Cane suggested and bought an American Classic Commander and modified it to fit my needs and wants. here is a link to the thread where i did mine.

    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f57/american-classic-commander-modified-75656/
     
  8. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Then get a springer.

    Colts work real well!

    [​IMG]

    30 yard Quartering Forward head-shot with the Colt 460 Rowland using Buffalo Bore 255 gr hard cast
     
  9. pagj17

    pagj17 New Member

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    Lol a colt govt is on my short list. First, though, my ruger
     
  10. 45slinger7

    45slinger7 New Member

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    Need some input .. Springfield 1911 gi a1 parkerized ... Can it Handel the 460 rowland kit? Do y'all think its beef up enough for the kit?
     
  11. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    It should be able to handle it. Clark's Customs Guns had a list of those 1911s that they would not convert, and I believe that SA was not on the list.
     
  12. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    http://www.clarkcustomguns.com/rowland.htm

    Looks like a heck of a lot of entertainment for $295.
     
  13. 45slinger7

    45slinger7 New Member

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    Guess I shouldn't try it then ... Thanks for the input
     
  14. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Look again. A modern production Springer GI is fine.

    Springfield Frames are strong enough. The Springfield GI is just a configuration or style. It's the old GI spec frames, from back when, that are iffy.

    If in doubt, call Clark.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013
  15. 45slinger7

    45slinger7 New Member

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    Thanks the replies was helpful ... Now another question the guys that did the conversion kit and shot with the 460 rowland .. Was it worth the money to y'all for the kit?
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I'm going to revive an old "zombie thread" and re-ask the question. I was given a 1911 frame and slide. It has sights and I have a new GI barrel. I have a few small parts, but would probably be best off getting a "kit".

    It appears SARCO has kits in stock for about $135, including the barrel. I see mixed reviews about SARCO parts kits.

    Any other suggestions?
     
  17. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    A few questions:

    What is the make on the slide and frame?

    Have they been fitted together? Is the detent pin tube staked to the frame? The ejector installed? Each can require special tools.

    What do you want out of the completed project? Just a beater, shooter? A bullseye gun? Carry piece?

    The SARCO kits include some spotty parts. Some are oversized, some don't have any extra metal for fitting, some were jacked up cast parts with incomplete machining.

    Sometimes the parts will fit together well enough to get basic function, but barrel and slide, link and pin, and barrel and bushing usually need fitting. Do you have the jigs, stones, files and tools to do the fitting?

    Add cost of tools and time and it usually makes more sense to invest in parts you actually want.

    If you only build one, the tools, individual parts and time usually make it Ecconomically smarter to buy a gun off the shelf.
     
  18. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I have the skill having attended 4 different armorers schools and life long tinkering. I am familiar with the 1911, having owned a few over the years.

    There is no plunger tube and no grip bushings. I have a staking tool for both these parts.

    Looking to build a shooter/beater. Brand of the components? No idea, nomarkings. Slide to frame fit is a bit sloppy. I will tighten that up a bit, but I will keep it kind of sloppy as long as it is reliable. I can always tighten up the slide to frame fit, add a longer link and tighter bushing if I choose later.

    I understand the SARCO parts are hit or miss. I may solicit small assorted parts from friends who have no need and buy the few I need.
     
  19. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Ok. That sounds about right. I bought one of the SARCO kits, just to have parts to get a build up and running, and to then have spare parts if needed. I ended up replacing every part over time. The disconnector was missing from the kit, the main spring housing was not drilled for the retaining pin and the grip safety was also not finish machines and had casting flash on it.

    If you've already built or rebuilt 1911s, then you are ahead of the game, but looking back, I'd have been better off skipping the SARCO parts.