19 or 686???

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by rdk45, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. rdk45

    rdk45 New Member

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    Hey guys need some help, I have a S&W model 19-7 2.5 inch barrel .357 magnum that is in really nice shape. I have a friend who has a S&W model 686 4 inch barrel who wants to trade the guns appear to be in basically the same condition so im wondering if this is a trade I should persue I need some input from some of you revolver guys who knows their stuff. I know the 19 is not made anymore and that is one of the drawbacks to this deal for me. Help me out guys.
     
  2. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    RDK,

    My opinion I would keep the Model 19 2.5". And buy something else that I wanted when the $$$ were available. And as you said the 19 2.5 is no longer being made. I also would check out gun broker for the values of both.
    Not that the 686 is a bad weapon because it is not. But also if you notice your Model 19 has a small pin up by the barrel. The barrel is threaded on to your receiver. And crush fit on the 686. That was just one of the things that I wished they had not done on some of the new models. In fact when they first started production I have seen some of the receivers crack at the barrel due to stress put on it when the pressed (Crush Fit) the barrel into the receiver. Probably would never happen on the one you are considering but it has happened in the past.
    May just have been a manufacturing issue at that time and I am sure they got it corrected.
    03
     

  3. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    The M19-7 doesn't have a pinned barrel. The M19-4 was the last model to have the P&R. The issue with the M19 series is the forcing cone and the top strap.

    The K Frame began as a .38-frame gun for the military and police. One of the weaknesses in the K-Frame is in the cut on the bottom of the barrel throat/forcing cone. This cut is to accommodate the cylinder swing. The cut presents a weak area and is acerbated by the use of light weight (read: shorter) bullets.

    Here's the Cliff Notes version.

    A M19 cylinder is made long enough to accommodate the full charge 158 gr bullet. When loaded with the shorter 125 gr jacketed bullet there is a longer distance required for it to reach the forcing cone. This extra time allows the hot gases to mix with the rich oxygen in the air and escapes around the bullet in the cylinder. Unlike the 158 that reaches the rifling as the base of the bullet leaves the case mouth, the 125 gas enters the barrel prior to the bullet reaching the rifling. I won't go into the physics but with the short bullet, the lion's share of gas is at the bottom, or weak point of the barrel's throat. This hot gas plasma will superheat the cone along with the blast of unburnt powder and erosion ensues. This plasma also preforms what is known as flame cutting of the frame.

    When buying a M19, or any revolver for that matter, check for this light bullet issue, The good news is if you find a used 19 in great condition, feed it with modern, heavier bullets which offer equal or better performance over a broader range of velocities. I like the SWC designs developed by Elmer Keith. I stay away from jacketed rounds.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011
  4. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

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    Definetly keep the 19. My 19-4 has been great. It was my father's gun as a police officer and I have been shooting it since I was about 8 years old. It is currently serving as the "go to" SD gun in the house. :)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011
  5. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I wanted to correct you that the 19-4 was the last P&R 19 that S&W made but when I do I see you've already corrected that....stupid computers.
     
  6. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Good catch Rusty. I fat fingered the 4.
     
  7. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I should also mention, I've put quite a bit of 158gr FMJ S&B thru mine with no ill effects. I also prefer the heavier loads in all my 357s, they just shoot nicer.
     
  8. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

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    I shoot 158 in mine also and I have found that they are softer shooting as well.
     
  9. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I absolutely LOVE heavy 357 loads. IMO, they are easier to shoot and hit harder....I'm also a hunter so I could be biased.
     
  10. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

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    I love the 200 grain loads in my Ruger. No Hog is safe. :D
     
  11. oldcoptn46

    oldcoptn46 Member Supporter

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    I realize I'm on this a little late but........ Keep the Model 19. You will never regret it. I have a 19-5, 4" and a 65-3, 3", round butt. Wouldn't get rid of them for anything. Looking for Model 13, 3" rounf butt, the blued version of the 65.:D

    Pops
     
  12. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Cane,

    Great Post! And thank you for informing me on the 19.7 Series vs the 19-4 Series. I just knew that most of the Model 19s I had seen had the pinned barrels and was not aware of the changes on the 19-7. And I knew the stainless 686s and others had the barrel pressed into the receivers. Once again that is the advantages and the educational area of the FTF. We all learn something new almost every time we visit!:)

    03
     
  13. rdk45

    rdk45 New Member

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    Thanks for all the input guys sounds pretty overwhemlingly in favor of keeping the 19. I appreciate your time.
     
  14. crazycharlie2

    crazycharlie2 New Member

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    Yeah. Keep the 19. I'm gonna keep mine. Bought it from the 'used' shelf, but it appears to be unfired.
     

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  15. Wambli

    Wambli Member

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    A dissenting vote. The 19 is a fantastic handgun and if you had a 19-2,-3 or even a -4 I would say keep it but later models just do not have the appeal or manufacturing care of the earlier ones. Does NOT make them bad guns, just not the originals.

    The 686, specially if it's an older ones (pre lock) is probably one of the best .357 mag guns S&W has eve made. The frame is beefed up to take the heavier loads but not ridiculously so. Have you seen the prices on pre-lock 686's on Gunbroker lately?

    I say trade it and at a later date find a n1ce 19-2 to hang on to.
     
  16. jismail

    jismail Member

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    I don't have experience with the 19, but i can tell you that my 681 has been a excellent firearm, even with it's fixed sights, and has never given me any issues. I like the feel of it, and fit and finish are top notch.
    [​IMG]