17hm2

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by primer1, May 16, 2018.

  1. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What happened to keep this cartridge from becoming a success? When it was introduced, I hoped to see used firearms pop up at the gun show and shops ready to be snatched up. My dreams of finding a used accurized 10-22 in 17hm2 are over.

    I thought that small varmint hunters, squirrel hunters, etc. would have appreciated the flat trajectory compared to the .22lr.

    So what was the demise of the cartridge?
    Cost vs 22lr?
    Large strides made by air rifle manufacturers?

    SGWGunsmith started a thread on the Ruger mark2 having problems with the recoil impulse. That certainly was a factor. Easy for me to say, but that seems like that problem could be have been corrected. The newer Savage a17 (17hmr) sounds pretty reliable these days as an example of technology and know how overcoming problems of 17 caliber rimfire cartridges.

    What say you?
     
  2. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So, why is a flat trajectory important for a squirrel? I have never shot at a squirrel from over around 150 feet. Usually, a long shot is in the top of a 60 foot tree. .22 LR does just fine at that kind of distances. You can't make that tree rat deader by hitting it faster or harder.

    Some calibers make a splash, others don't. The gun and ammo makers are always on the search for something new and exciting to boost sales, designing and producing the new product that you just can't live without. Not everything succeeds.
     
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  3. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Personally, I felt the 17 rimfires were a contributing factor in the 22LR shortage. There is only so much rimfire production capacity.
     
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  4. IowaShooter

    IowaShooter Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I had a couple if 17hmr firearms

    Fun round! I presume the HM2 is,something different?
     
  5. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hm2 is a 22lr necked down to .17
     
  6. IowaShooter

    IowaShooter Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Faster, quicker, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound?
     
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  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    The pages of firearm history are littered with "We thought it would be a good idea....." cartridges. Sort of orphans, most will have a devout follower or two. See also .35 S&W Auto, .307 Marlin, Daisy VL caseless 22, etc. Just my opinion? Did not really offer more than the LR, and did not fill a specific need. The .17 HMR DOES offer a significant step up over the .22 LR, but the Mach 2 does not.

    And you might look up the name Alton Jones. MANY years ago, he created this nifty little .14 caliber rimfire.......from a .22 LR round.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    14 caliber? That would mean another cleaning rod again. Can't have that.
     
  9. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A quick search found that when shooting straight up, a 9mm will go 4000 feet high and hit the ground 15-20 seconds after being shot. A 30-06 will go 10,000 feet and hit the ground about a minute after the shot.

    I couldn't find any information on the 22lr or 17hm2 being shot straight up, but I would like to think that both could leap the tallest building (over 2700 ft) in a single bound, er, shot.
     
  10. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The .17 Mach II uses a CCI Stinger case, as it's a tad longer than the normal .22 long rifle case. As far as why it lost some of its appeal, the .17 Mach II is much more destructive to critters like gray squirrels, in the event you might want one or two for dinner.
    Nobody writes about the "other" .17 caliber rimfire that was formed, and produced on the .22 Long Rifle case, the .17 High Standard. I do have all three .17 caliber rimfire rounds and will try and get some comparison pictures posted later today.
    The .22 Long Rifle has been challenged before, by one round that comes to mind, the 5 mm Remington. This is a .22 magnum case necked down to .20 caliber. Every now and then, some of that ammunition will be produced, as the original stuff runs around $1.00 each.

    I've shot and tested both the .17 Mach II and the .17 HMR cartridges in Marlin Model 917 rifles. Both rounds are very accurate, and they will turn chipmunks into red mist.
    So, I wouldn't set up any funerals on the say-so of negativity, as there are still guns out there chambered in both .17 calibers and I still do see ammunition available for those rifles.
     
  11. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

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    The 17 Aguila works just fine in the 17MII. It is available at most well stocked stores.

    17 Aguila and 17 High Standard is the same cartridge.
     
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  12. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are MANY sensible thinkers just like yourself who feel the same way. A lot of rimfire shooters are not as short sighted as those in that extremely limited minority who feel because they can't afford one, they shouldn't exist. There was tons of sensible discussion when the .17 rimfires first came out, as to why not just stick with the .22 rimfires.
    I get to meet quite a lot of "actual" shooters who use the .17 HMR out to 200 yards for prairie dogs, and for woodchucks that eat their young cabbage plants and other vermin ( skunks, fox, weasels and raccoon ) that don't necessarily hang out in fenced in, back yard trees. The .17 HMR is easy to obtain without reloading rounds like the .22 Hornet, or the high cost involved with those rounds in factory produced rounds.