12GA Slug question

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by 2ndAmendmentFreedom, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    Hey all,
    I was wondering what's the diameter of a 12GA rifled slug. I don't have any slugs to cut open right now so I was wondering if anyone knew. I was thinking it'd be close to .73 but considering a lot of people shoot slugs through improved cylinders, I guess they might be a bit smaller than .73.

    Thanks!
     
  2. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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  3. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    All of them? So when they go through an IC they simply change shapes?
     
  4. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Lead will deform. Some of the Foster types are .69 to .73 in diameter. They are hollow based, so teh slug can get a good seal but still deform down to accomodate a small choke. (They usually recommend no tighter than a Modified choke).

    Brenneke slugs are also around .72 in diameter. Remember that these slugs have rifling and they need to be in good contact with the bore to be able to impart spin on the projectile. Lead is softer than the barrel so it will deform.
     
  5. oli700

    oli700 New Member

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    I hate to be nitpicky SSGN_Doc because you are huge breath of fresh air around here but the rifling’s don’t impart spin on the slugs. They are there to provide the "squish zone" in the various chokes. The hollow base is three fold. First it provides a means for the skirt to seal to the bore upon ignition of the charge, second it does give for the choke but mostly it gives the foster the nose heavy characteristics it needs so it dosent tumble in flight.....think badminton shuttlecock.

    This applies only to factory loads and not Lee or Lyman cast slugs.

    Sabot : designed for rifled barrel. Can be shot through a Cylinder (no choke) smooth bore, do not shoot through a chokes barrel of any sort. Reason is the sabot is solid and will not swag down to the size of a choke. Another reason is poor accuracy, it is killing accurate to an extent but the sabot will key hole….or tumble in flight.

    Rifled foster slug: foster refers to the hollow base. The hollow base expands from the pressure of the discharge sealing the skirt to the bore. The “rifling” is not for anything other than providing a crumple zone, if you will ,for the slug to fit through various chokes. The rifling does not impart spin on the slug. Designed for smooth bore and can be shot through a rifled barrel with ok accuracy but not as good as a sabot.

    Brenneke style:. It is basically an improved foster. The Wad, or shot column stays with the slug through penetration. This offers some advantages in flight stability and extra mass for energy and penetration on the target. This is where you need to pay attention to labeling as some Brenneke brand slugs can be sabots and will be labeled as so.

    This is not a Brenneke brand slug but it is a Brenneke style. Take away the wad/column and it is a rifled foster
    [​IMG]

    Take away the wad/column and it is a rifled foster
    [​IMG]

    Here are some of my home cast Lee Key drives .69”

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Now someone will come along disagree and call me a know it all but whatever
     
  6. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    Very informative, thanks guys!
     
  7. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks forthe additional info. I did know that the hollow base was there to allow for a better seal (Much like a Minnie Ball out of a rifled musket) and that the weight forward would also help with stability. But I was under the impression that they were rifled to help get some spin on there as well. I thought it was why folks would say that when using slugs either the slug shoud be rifled, or the bore should be rifled, but not both.

    Not too old to learn something new. I don't mind getting nits picked as long as it helps give clearer info.
     
  8. oli700

    oli700 New Member

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    Right on, check into it when you get a chance, I wouldn’t steer you wrong bro
     
  9. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Oli is right. The "rifling" is just to allow the slug to pass through any choke w/o causing a dangerous over pressure. The rifling is mostly non existant by the time the slug leaves the barrel.
     
  10. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nice post oli
     
  11. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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  12. oli700

    oli700 New Member

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    Are they solid ?
     
  13. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The rifling on slugs is not there to spin the slug. It is there to compress when going through a choke where they "might" pick up a little spin. The rifled slugs depend on weight forward for accuracy. Brenneke slugs use a wad attached to the base to get the weight forward. Round balls should only be used in a cylinder bore as they do not compress very well. Rifled shotgun barrels require the use of sabot slugs for accuracy.
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I believe they are essentially a solid round ball with the nylon fin attached. The "spin" is probably overstated. The concept is much like the Brenneke in that the weight is forward giving stability.
     
  15. oli700

    oli700 New Member

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    Cool, I bet it hits hard….being solid