125gr .357

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by btf683, Jan 11, 2014.

  1. btf683

    btf683 New Member

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    So I heard that using any .357 mag round under 125gr could damage a revolver like my taurus 627. Any one here know of anything like this??
     
  2. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    Bogus information. If you don't feel comfortable, box up all the under 125 grain ammo you have for your .357 mag and send it to me. :p
     

  3. btf683

    btf683 New Member

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    Haven't bought anything under 125gr yet... Bought the gun last weekend with a box of hornedy critical defense 125gr hallow points don't want to waste them on paper
     
  4. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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  5. btf683

    btf683 New Member

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    Thanks for your help gatoragn... I have been working 12 hr shifts haven't been to a LGS for a while to try and find some paper worthy ammo besides some. 38sp.... Anything else I should be aware of with a wheel gun as you call it
     
  6. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    They like to replicate, it starts with one and before you know happened you have half a dozen laying around. :D

    Enjoy your new to you shooter.
     
  7. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    It appears you have yet to properly introduce yourself to FTF. ;). Please stop by the Introductions section sometime and spill some beans.

    Welcome aboard.
     
  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    If you just bought the revolver, then you should have an owner's manual.

    My suggestion is to use what they recommend.

    Remember, lighter bullets have a different POI than heavier bullets.
     
  9. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In a word (or two):rolleyes: BS;)
     
  10. regload

    regload Member

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    Perhaps you (or your source) heard about the "flame cutting" happening on the Scandium-frame S&W ultra-ligthweight snubbies. That can occur with very lightweight bullets and full powder charges. Not sure if 125 grain is what is talked about with that subject. So much flash and flame exits the cylinder when firing that the flame can "cut" the top strap of the revolver.
    I KNOW that does NOT happen with my SP101, and I use 125 grain bullets all the time (at this time they are easier to get), after firing a couple hundred lead bullets for target practice, then following up with thirty or forty jacketed HP 125 grain bullets, to shoot out the lead which may have accumulated in the barrel.
    So, perhaps it matters what gun one is using.
     
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I am not afraid to shoot anything that came in a box marked Hornady.
     
  12. crossfire

    crossfire New Member

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    Current .357 Magnum ammo is loaded to SAAMI spec 35 kpsi and is much less liable to flame cut. The S&W K-frame .357's had not only flame cutting but forcing cone issues with the old 43 kpsi factory standard.
     
  13. btf683

    btf683 New Member

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    Thanks guys I had some time to sit and look into the manual as I only glanced through it when I got home... It does have a warning about the possibility of flame cutting .
     
  14. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Winchester 110 grain semi jacket hp is a lighter load according to chronograph info I have seen. Makes a good round in a snubbie. A little hotter than +P but not full house 125.
     
  15. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Gas cutting is increased dramatically when firing jacketed rounds in a fouled barrel. All lead should be removed from the barrel before shooting jacketed magnum rounds. The lead build up in the forcing cone allows gas cutting in the critical area of the barrel.:eek:
     
  16. spottedpony

    spottedpony New Member

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    This issue isnt limited only to jacketed loads fired at close to max pressures. Case in point, years ago I spec'd and had built a ppc gun, bases on a model 10 K frame. the only ammo fired in it were target loads w/wadcutters at +/- 800 fps. After thousands upon thousands of rounds some slight gas erosion was visible inside the topstrap. Though it was slight and after several times more ammo than the average wheel gun shooter will put through any one handgun, it was evident, and not limited to my particular pistol. A few other of the competitors i regularly shot with had similar issues after many thousands of rounds using both K frames and colts.
    So in reality, fire enough of any ammo eventually top strap erosion is a possiblilty, though remote with normal use.