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Hey guys! Some of you have prob seen another post of mine in here but as I said before this is my first shotgun and had another concern. I recently got a Mossberg Scorpion and have watched a number of instructional/review vids on YouTube. I haven’t taken it to the range just yet but bought a couple of those snap caps to familiarize myself at home. It feels like that spring has a decent amount of resistance compared to watching these guys speed load it on the vids. Is this because it’s brand new and takes a little time for it to break in? Just wanted to put my mind at ease and make sure I didn’t buy a defect :)
 

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Yes, brand new guns can be stiffer than once they have been broken-in a bit. (Try a CZ 2075 RAMI pistol, sometime. Darned near inoperable for the first thousand rounds or so, until the spring gives up 1/4 of its strength and the slide+frame mating surfaces have smoothed up.)

I'm assuming you have done a disassembly, cleaning and lubrication, to ensure everything's in order ... and mostly to ensure it's clean and lubricated where it needs to be. But if you haven't definitely take it apart and go through all of the key parts where there's clear metal-to-metal sliding against one another. It'll operate better with a modest bit of lube in such places. (The owner's manual should indicate exactly where to lube; and some how-to vids on Youtube and elsewhere can assist.)

Disassembly @ Mossberg/Youtube:

Cleaning @ Mossberg/Youtube:

Lubrication @ Mossberg/Youtube:

Reassembly @ Mossberg/Youtube:

Cleaning and Lubrication @ Hoppes/Youtube:

Parts diagram @ Numrich (GunParts):

I'd pay particular attention to the action tube rails, the elevator assembly (rails), and the top of the trigger assembly (hammer), mildly lubricating the rails and mating surfaces to help with smooth operation.

You can also rack the shotgun a couple hundred times, as well, to help loosen things up, once you've got it cleaned and lubricated. Minor manufacturing imperfections on the rails will begin to get knocked down and smoothed. (Each gun's a little different, and your particular 500 might well have a few more minor imperfections or tolerance issues that'll exist until it breaks in a bit.)


Had a lightly used Remington 870 Police 12ga. Was a little stiffer, at the outset, until it had been racked several hundred times and had been fired a couple hundred times. Kept it cleaned and decently lubricated. Was quite smooth and reliable, after that. I doubt the Mossberg 500's much different.
 

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All this ^^^^^
Those springs are supposed to be stiff, that gives you reliable feeding.
Get yourself a few boxes of estate shells and just go to town with it. Clays, pumpkins, cans, whatever. Shoot the snot out of it for a couple hundred rounds. Then clean very well.
You will feel a difference.
 

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@Mozzarella Mark , Speaking of the Estate brand shotgun shells, here's an auction on GunBroker with current pricing not too bad (given the nasty overpricing many shops [and GunBroker sellers] often charge these days).

250rds 12ga 7-1/2 loads, 2-3/4" shells, for $135 + tx + shpg:
 

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All this ^^^^^
Those springs are supposed to be stiff, that gives you reliable feeding.
Get yourself a few boxes of estate shells and just go to town with it. Clays, pumpkins, cans, whatever. Shoot the snot out of it for a couple hundred rounds. Then clean very well.
You will feel a difference.
Agreed, my first shotgun was the same. The safety was stiff and the pump had quite a bit of resistance when manipulating it. Even though it was freshly cleaned and very well oiled. It barely had any rounds through it. So everything was very sticky.

Now hundreds of rounds later, and a crap ton of character to show for it. It is very slick, it’s at the same level as my pistol and my DMR. Where the manipulating of the action is so smooth that I’m not even trying.

So yes, follow cliffs advice because that’s exactly what I did. Get you a few boxes of shells, I buy birdshot a lot because it’s cheap and super fun to shoot and just go to town with it.
 

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Some guns are shipped with a rust-inhibiting substance. Remington action cleaner will generally remove it if field-stripped (not disassembled, just broken down a bit). After spraying, simply wipe with a clean rag, spray parts with Rem-Oil, wipe parts down again and re-assemble. Owner's manual should point out lubrication points.

Over-oiling will create it's own problems and attract "ackumpucky" (dust,dirt, lint, etc) that accumulates like oily buggers in various nooks, crannies, and moving parts. Lubricating moving parts isn't done with a spray gun at this point. One drop at a time, then wiped lightly.

Mossberg pumps are not as "slick" as 870's, require more force to cycle.

Make sure the gun is fully unloaded and cycle the action over and over after cleaning and properly lubricating. Then cycle the action some more. Don't have to dry-fire, just hold down the action release. You have chosen a good shotgun.
 

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