104 Years Young and Still Going Strong!

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by Alamo308, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. Alamo308

    Alamo308 New Member

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    My Swedish M94 Mauser, built at Carl Gustafs Stads Gevärsfaktori in 1903. This example is actually the "M94-14" variant, having been modified in 1914 with the redesigned nose cap to add the bayonet lug with stabilizing extension to the muzzle band. The yellow decal appears to the casual observer to be installed upside down, but this is intended so that the shooter can simply rotate the stock to conveniently view the printed elevation conversion table for adjusting between the two different velocities of issue ammo.
    This is an amazingly quick-pointing and handy-sized rifle (carbine?) originally issued to fortification, artillery, and transport troops. Still with its original all-matching serial numbers. The early version of the brass stock disk bears only the unit and a rack number, rather than the later disks which displayed bore condition 'codes', but no unit details.
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  2. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Love it. They dont make em like they used to.
     

  3. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Swedes are outstanding rifles. I have an '05 model 96 that acts like it has self homing bullets. If I want to shoot for bragging rights with iron sights it is the rifle that comes out. The only thing that competes is an Argentine Model 1891.
     
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  4. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    http://www.gotavapen.se/gota/artiklar/rifles_se/rifles_se.htm
     
  5. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Lately I've been seeking the carbines in military rifles.

    The shorter versions are usually very similar to their

    longer infantry counterparts, and they have some

    practical utility, also.
     
  6. Bigbill

    Bigbill Member

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    I been buying m94 that we're made into spotters and was able to find m94 stock sets with metal to turn back the time to make them orginal again.
     
  7. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have gone down that rabbit hole with pawn shop finds I felt sorry for. They have sat in shame in the gun racks far longer than I thought. However, I am an optimistic man, and hope to someday find a few nice stocks. Does anyone have an Argentine '91 stock laying around? ;)
     
  8. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I really like the Mannlicher style stock on this particular Mauser.

    If I can find a clean one, I may just become a Mauser owner,

    some day...
     
  9. Alamo308

    Alamo308 New Member

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    I don't blame you! And you might also like the Argentine M1909 carbine, too:
    1909_Argy_carbine_DWM_s-nA8472_full-length_rt-side_on-fence_reduced.jpg
     
  10. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    This here is my 1898 Carl Gustav m/96 rifle. It went to the Goteborg arsenal in 1938 along with most of the rest, but although it had a lot of the mods done to it, for some reason it never got shortened, and is now a rare old thing, being a /m/96 with threaded muzzle, replaced fore and back-sight and a nice new stock. Well, new in 1938, that is.

    It shoots very well. even with me behind it.

    upload_2020-2-18_14-41-39.png
    This ten-shot group was with PPU - @100m -
    upload_2020-2-18_14-42-33.png
    These two five-shot groups were with my handloads....same distance.
    upload_2020-2-18_14-43-54.png
    This is the backsight that I'm using...it's a Wehrmann peepsight from around 1932 or so, before Hitler banned private ownership of military calibre rifles...of course, it fits ANY Mauser with the same take-down latch...
    upload_2020-2-18_14-46-5.png
     
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  11. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    Shux, missed this one...
    upload_2020-2-18_14-47-45.png
     
  12. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    GUYS

    Absolutely fine rifles! Thanks for the Pictures. Nothing like the nostalgia rifles of the past!

    03
     
  13. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    Coupla old Mausers here...

    #1 - Tehran Arsenal, license-built from Brno, so-called Persian Mauser - mint, with serial-number matching bayonet.


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    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand #2 ditto, carbine, from Venezuela...


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    Not forgetting the ultra-spiffy all-machined spring-loaded muzzle cap doodad....


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    Good, eh?
     
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  14. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    TAC

    THEY ARE VERY, VERY, NICE!~
    However THEY would look better in my collection and in my safe!:D
    03
     
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  15. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I hate Mausers.

    Mausers II.jpeg

    These three Swedes I hate the most. The 1908 target rifle is the most accurate with a 1/2" 3 shot group at 100 yards.
    1908 FSR m96 wallpaper.jpg 1912 and 1918 Swedish m41 and m41B.png

    1918 m/41B on top with cheek rest. I have shot it in vintage sniper matches with some success. Bottom 1912 m/41, everything matches which is quite rare for a sniper rifle.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2020
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  16. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    This is my Boer War DWM carbine - from 1897. It is just three digits away from Ian McCullum's on his forgotten Weapons programme.
    upload_2020-2-18_19-28-22.png
    I have the cleaning rod in my hand for this shot, and can't remember why..
    Here is the name of the owner -
    upload_2020-2-18_19-29-27.png

    P for Piet Huijsen. Thanks to the Anglo-Boerse Oorlogs Musee in Bloemfontein I've traced his history up to the day he handed it in to the Australian unit by which he had been taken PoW on 10th May 1901.

    upload_2020-2-18_19-31-53.png
     
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