Handgun Reviews

This category covers all handgun reviews.

  • New Russian Army Pistol

    The 29-ounce 9x18mm Makarov pistol (Soviet designation Pistolet Makarova, M-442), adopted in 1951, is still in service around many former Warsaw block countries and is still found in wide military and police use in Russia. With its 8-shot magazine, stout recoil and heavy trigger pull, the 'Soviet Walther' is something of a last ditch weapon. Since 2003 it had been supplemented for combat operations by the more modern MP443 Grach (Russian designation 6P35 Pistolet Yarygina PYa) double action...
  • The Story Of A Glock

    I have been a fan of the Glock handgun since I was far too young to even know what I was really looking at besides the fact that I saw the M17 used in movies. I had my heart set on an M17 when I first got my license to carry, unfortunately for me, I live in Massachusetts and wanting a factory new firearm for my first gun disqualified any Glock. So, I settled on something else. Once the glamour of being licensed to carry in one of the most anti-gun states had subsided I began my search for a...
  • Old Brit 38 Revolvers for Home Defense

    When something goes bump in the night, many believers in the 2nd Amendment reach for something solid and reliable to arm themselves with before they investigate. Many of these believers reach for an old British 38, and for good reason. Two old popular surplus revolvers, the Webley MkIV and the No.2 Enfield, both "top break" .38 S&W weapons from the WWII-era, are chosen for many reasons. They can always be picked up at gun shows and online firearms sellers such as Gunbroker and Gunsamerica...
  • Springfield Armory 3.8 Compact 45ACP

    I have been shooting and enjoying 1911s since the late 80's. Recently my wife picked out a Springfield Armory XDm 4.5 inch in 9mm and after trying her gun out I had to get an XDm of my own. I chose the 4.5 inch 45acp version. After shooting it for the last couple of months i have been converted from a dyed in the wool 1911 snob. I shoot the XDm much better, faster, and more accurate than I can my 1911s. I love my 1911s but they take back seat at this point to the XDm series. I tried the XD...
  • Kel Tec P3AT .380 ACP

    Manufacturer - Kel Tec This is my "carry" autoloader, a Kel Tec P3AT. It's a .380ACP caliber 6+1 capacity. It is about as small as you can get with a 380 and still hang on to it during your "time of Need". I had some feed issues at first but a polish job on the ramp fixed it. Kel Tec says it needs breaking in... maybe so, But you can't put you life at risk with a gun that "needs breaking in". That's why I opted to Fluff & Buff my Kel Tec right from the start. It will shoot any .380 ammo,...
  1. Smith & Wesson's M&P .40: A Modern Contender

    As we all know, Smith & Wesson has been a staple in the American firearm industry since the late 1850s, producing weapons for civilians, LEO, and Military alike. Their reputation for making innovated and excellent wheel-guns proceeds them in a prestigious manner. There's a reason they've been around for so long, they make good stuff! Smith & Wessons earlier attempts at the civilian and Mil/LEO semi-automatic pistol markets have been "hit-and-miss", if you will. Some models, such as the...
  2. Flare Gun Sub Caliber Inserts

    We all have them or at least have seen them. Those cute little International orange or yellow plastic flare guns with their abbreviated 12-gauge rocket flares. They run about $50 for a new one. There has long been a desire to turn them into...something more. 26.5mm European Projectors These flare guns are popular with foreign militaria collectors. They are lore bore (slightly over one-inch wide) projectors used by many Western European military units and merchant shipping/SOLAS purposes....
  3. Pattons Colt 45 Single Action Army

    General George Smith Patton, Jr. (11 November 1885 21 December 1945), is a legend in US military history. In his 60-years of life, he spent the majority of it wearing one uniform or another and died on active service. Forever the warrior, he is fittingly buried in a military cemetery in Europe, not far from where he died. As a soldier, he carried many guns, but one of these is almost as famous as he was. His Colt .45. The Single Action Army Colt's Model of 1873, better known as the Single...
  4. The FM Argentine Hi Power

    The great engineer and inventor of masterpieces of mechanical design, John Moses Browning, took steel, wood, and magic and blended them together to create some of the most treasured firearms in modern history. Best remembered for his 1911 design, the Hi-Power was one of his last gifts to us. The truth is that Browning contributed to the design by engineers at FN in Belgium finished it after his death, but let us not let that detract from the legend. Imminent gun writer and shootist Colonel...
  5. The Nearly Forgotten 38SW

    Today when you say speak of a 'thirty-eight,' most people think first of the near universal .38 Special round, used since 1898. Well lets set that aside and speak of the 'special's granddaddy-- the .38 S&W. This 140-year old mild-recoiling round was a favorite of yesteryear and is still a viable shooter today. The History of the round Back in the 1870s Smith and Wesson was introducing a new revolver, what later became known as their First Model series and they needed a new, reliable round...
  6. ISSC M22 22LR Review

    I have always liked shooting .22LR for target practice; it's doesn't bust the wallet, it's easy to load, and easier to group for training purposes as well as just having fun at the range. I had just recently sold my Walther P22 in favor of the .380 but still missed having a .22LR for fun at the range. So when asked to review the ISSC M22 .22LR I was quite happy to get my hands on it. Out of the box and into my hand I knew right away I liked the feel of the M22 much better than previous...
  7. The Colt Detective Special

    Twenty years before Smith and Wesson gave the world their Chief's Special, Colt pioneered the snub-nosed revolver. A handy six-shooter with a 2-inch barrel, the Colt gun was revolutionary for its day and is still viable nearly a century later. Colt called it the Detective Special. Why In the 1920s, a new wave of Prohibition criminals such as John Dillinger, Machinegun Kelly, and Clyde Barrow captured the public's imagination. They also scared the crap out of law enforcement. With these...
  8. Bersa Thunder 9 Ultra Compact Pro Review

    As I have a limited budget, I'm always on the lookout for an inexpensive firearm to fill the requirements of a CCW gun. While at a local gun show recently, I came across a Bersa Thunder 9, and decided to give it a closer look. The particular model I came across was the Thunder 9 Ultra Compact Pro priced at $400. In spite of its "Ultra Compact" name, this gun is not a pocket gun. At 6.5 inches in length and 4.75 inches tall, weighing in at 23 ounces empty, it is significantly bigger and...
  9. Five Good $300 CCW Guns

    For many who would chose to carry a concealed handgun, there is a moment of pause were what's in the pocketbook doesn't support buying that flashy Kimber or SIG that's on the cover of the gun mags. With that in mind, here are a few solid roscoes that won't break the bank. Kel Tec PF9 Florida-based Kel Tec is one of the better-known medium-sized firearms makers of the past twenty years. Their sub compact PF-9 is one of the lightest (just 18.2 oz. fully loaded) and flattest (0.88″ wide) 9mm...
  10. SIG Arms ACP Kit to turn any Railed Pistol into a Carbine

    Introduced this month at the SHOT Show industry event, SIG ARMS/SIG Sauer of Exeter New Hampshire has debuted their revolutionary new Adaptive Carbine Platform or ACP. Now pistol-to-carbine conversion kits are not new on the market. Companies like Hera Arms, Stellar Rigs and Mech Tech have sold carbine conversion units for years that take popular handgun platforms such as the 1911 and Glock 17 and create a more stable PDW type of weapon. Most of these designs however take a basic pistol and...
  11. How Many Weapons Do YOU Carry

    When you leave the house and go about your daily travels, are you armed? If so, with what? Do you vary multiple weapons, and if so, do you carry more than one firearm? Let us look at that. The philosophy of a backup weapon Putting your eggs all in one basket-- or for the subject of this article, trusting your life and those around you to one imperfect gadget, is borderline foolhardy. Yes, you may have a super tactical top-of-the-line CCW handgun that you have practiced with for a decade...
  12. A Tan LCP

    With new and gee-whiz firearms coatings popping up left and right, I came to a crossroads in which I needed to make a choice. Here is the story of how I ended up with a rather sandy looking .380. My Ruger LCP dilemma So I carry a back-up gun from time to time in my line of work. Occasionally in street clothes as a normal CCW practitioner, I also sometimescannot carry a full-sized handgun comfortably without printing, especially in summer. This leaves me with one of the best compact .380s...
  13. The Mars Syndicate Pistol

    Wool jackets, bowler hats, waxed mustaches and the pall of London's thick coal-dust fog. All you, the discerning gentleman are missing, is a pistol to practice the manly art of self-protection. You can choose any of the superb Webley products like the Bulldog or Ulster Constabulary style weapons; however, you are looking for something bigger, better. You ask yourself as you read the Times, what would define you as a man in modern steam-powered 1902 London? Then you see it, the MARS pistol. A...
  14. Ruger LC9

    Recommended? - YES! Company Website - Ruger.com Manufacturer - Ruger Model: LC9 Maker: Ruger caliber:.9mm(Para/Luger) Wt.: 17.1Oz. Barrel: 3.12" Steel Alloy Slide: Hardened Alloy Capacity: 7+1 Width: 0.90" Twist: 1:10" Right Hand Finish: Blued Length: 6.00" Height: 4.50" Sights:Adjustable 3-Dot Std. Available with Crimson Trace Or Lasermax Grips: Glass Filled Nylon CA Approved: Yes MA Approved: No MSRP: $449.00 (Image Courtesey of Ruger.com)
  15. The New Beretta BU9 Nano

    Whenever I decide it's time to purchase a new firearm, the first step in the process of deciding what to buy is usually its planned use - at least that's what I tell myself. From there the process is helped greatly by the Internet. Whether it's video reviews, websites or forums, there are so many opinions out there...and you know what they say about opinions. But it's easy to sift through the "BS" and get to the honest, thorough, and useful information to help along the way. Heck that's...
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