Modifying a ccw

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by ARlover, Apr 10, 2014.

  1. ARlover

    ARlover New Member

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    Iv herd that the lawyers can mess with you
    I just had a thread and y'all were awesome I have on order a g30s
    Thinking of night sights idk about a light trigger like a ghost 3.5 since there is no safety what's your input


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  2. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    i would shoot the snot out of it first to see what needs to be changed to your liking.. but how will you know what to change if you havent tried it first?
     

  3. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc New Member

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    Agree withthe above. I have multiple Glocks. I have a model 17 that I put a 3.5 lb connector with reduced reset, but that pistol is primarily a range and competition gun. My model 19 and 26 have stock triggers, night sights, extended slide releases, extended mag releases that have been sanded a bit, and I stippled the grip of my 19. Anything that I have modded on it I can make a case that it gives me more positive control, of the gun, or increases my hit potential to avoid misses and reduce liability from a miss.
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired

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    Okay, time to clear a misconception time.

    A Glock does have safeties!

    First, the lever in the trigger can be called a safety. It does not allow the trigger to pulled to release the shot unless it is depressed.

    Second, there is a firing pin block that is not released unless the trigger is pulled.

    Third, yes there is a third, That space between the ears is the most important safety of all. Use it and 99.9% of Glock accidents can be avoided.
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired

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    Mods can enhance a handgun or create a piece of junk.
    But which mods are best?

    You have to know exactly needs to be modded. And that knowledge is only obtained by shooting the snot out of it first.
    One range session will not expose all areas.
     
  6. manta

    manta Active Member

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    Is that not the same with most firearms. As for mods I think most handguns are have acceptable levels of accuracy and reliability without mods. Some people lighten the trigger for example, I think if someone is shooting at you the trigger pull could be 20 lbs and most people wouldn't notice.
     
  7. davva360

    davva360 New Member

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    Why not just buy a gun you like in the first place and don't need to mod for your CCW?

    I can understand buying a gun and customizing the heck out of it, just not for CCW. Find a gun that works in stock form. There are plenty to choose from.
     
  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired

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    My comment was toward the Glock. Other firearms may have different forms to stop sear or trigger movement.
     
  9. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    In addition to all the above, whatever mods you make to the firearm, my advice is be able to make a compelling argument for why it was necessary in your case in order for you to be better equipped to defend your life with. Provided your Glock will be a defensive tool, of course.
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    A good shoot is a good shoot. It doesn't matter if you used a 15 ton acme safe hanging on a rope or a rolling pin or a glock with night sights and a good trigger. If your going to trial you have bigger issues than a customized gun.

    The gun in and of itself is not going to be causation of a murder trial. People in chicago use illegal firearms to defend themselves and get charged with gun possession not murder on defensive shoots.

    No one has ever been charged with murder solely because of a modified gun on a justifide defensive shoot.

    However, there have been people who have negligently discharged highly and poorly modified guns injured or killed someone and the gun itself was used as evidence of depraved indifference... I think that's where the myth stems
     
  11. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    There seems to be some confusion between the terms 'safety' and 'safety lever'.

    The Glock has three passive built in safeties. They keep the firing pin from moving. Their home position is engaged. They are always engaged unless the 'safety lever', located in the middle of the trigger, is depressed along with the trigger itself.

    http://us.glock.com/technology/safe-action

    The only mods I have on my G19 are a Red Dot sight and a rubber sleeve on the grip. I would also advise not changing anything until you've shot a couple of hundred rounds through it.
     
  12. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    Glock Safeties

    There is another safety on Glocks. It is called the drop safety...the trigger safety, the firing pin safety and the drop safety. The "space between the ears" safety I really like because it should be used with any weapon and with it, you can avoid lots of issues where lawyers come with the scenery. Remember, there is a lawyer attached to the base of every bullet that comes out of the end of the barrel.
    If this is to be a CCW then night sights are a welcome addition since most self-defense shootings happen in low light. I'd wait on the trigger until after shooting several hundred rounds through it. In a SD shooting, you'll not notice the light trigger, and it could prove troublesome. Watch:

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDfNV9bJoSg[/ame]
     
  13. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    Back on subject. As a former assistant d.a. and defense attorney, let me say the answer to that is a definite . . . mebbe. It depends on the person and the circumstances as to what a prosecutor will do.

    I would say that nite sights and, on a glock, a ligher trigger pull could easily be argued that they made the gun safer, as if there were a legitimate occasion for use, both increase the chances of hitting your target and not innocent bystanders. That would be my argument, anyway.

    I think both of those modifications are reasonable, and would not come back to bite you in court.
     
  14. manta

    manta Active Member

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    My point is that most firearms don't shoot unless you pull the trigger the same as a glock. So I don't see how a lever on the trigger can be seen as a safety, doesn't make sense to me. You pull the trigger unintentionally it shoots there is no safety to prevent it shooting. As for mods I don't see the need buy a firearm that you like and are happy with.
     
  15. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    this is true. but most states look at the circumstance around the shoot before they even take a look at the gun. you have to be really doing something way out of line to begin with before your ever end up in front of a jury.

    if your in a evil place where criminals have all the rights and honest citizens go to jail for not letting someone rape them then you might have issues but those stem more from where you are than anything about the gun itself.

    you should have someone competent do any modifications to your firearm. it does take special tools to safely install night sights. doing it yourself and you crack the tritium inserts from banging away with punches and hammers, the tritium leaks out and poisons some kid in a mcD then you might have deep issues.

    personally i refuse to carry or own a glock. i dont feel they are any safer than carrying a revolver with the cylinder full and hammer cocked. folks dont carry revolvers in that fashion because its not safe. glocks and other guns of this type are the same thing. the only striker gun i feel is safe to carry is the xd/xdm because it has a grip safety the user has to be in full control of the gun for the gun to go off.

    glocks and m&p have discharged on their lonesome from foreign objects working their way into holsters and depressing the "safe action" triggers when officers have sat down in patrol cars.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2014
  16. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc New Member

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    Much like a grip safety. It is really only for drop protection. Once a hand is on a grip safety it is "off".
     
  17. partdeux

    partdeux New Member

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    And what did your lawyer say when you asked his legal advice?
     
  18. Missouribound

    Missouribound Member

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    The arguments are good for either way. But I have an opinion about changing the characteristics of a carry gun, and it was something I learned in my CCW class. In the event you have to use your gun in a confrontation, that gun will come into question and actually be confiscated by the LEO's. Should you have made any changes to that gun, or used ammo which you reloaded yourself, the attorney would have an avenue to pursue which would indicate that you were "looking" to make your gun more deadly by those modifications. Gun manufacturers and ammo manufacturers have great liability insurance to protect them for any involvement in a shooting that may happen with their products. When you alter one or the other, or both, that removes their liability....it's now on your shoulders. I am not about to take that risk, especially since there are so many great carry guns and ammo already available..
    Just my humble opinion.........:cool:
     
  19. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc New Member

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    Cite a case for precedent, where it happened, otherwise it is the sort of myth that class instructors circulate.

    How would night sights increase lethality? How would loading ammo inside of specs in a reloading manual increase lethality? Extended safety, extended mag release, more predictable trigger? If the prosecuting attorney can't cite a case, it is a dead end road.
     
  20. Missouribound

    Missouribound Member

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    I'm not a lawyer, and I'm not arguing any point. But since you asked, let's assume you install night sights. If I was a lawyer I would say "Anyone who would alter the sights on their weapon to have better aiming at night surely must be lookiing to shoot someone in low-level lighting conditions. Nobody goes to the shooting range at night, so it's clear that this gun owner had intentions of shooting someone at night. Can anyone tell me why night vision sights are are needed for target practice?...of course they can't because in the normal target shooting scenario, it is done in well lit areas. But someone who INTENDED to shoot a person at night would want these sights on their weapon".