Crimping .40

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Kraj, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    Im new to reloading with lead bullets, but i understand how to reload. I got a lone wolf barrel to be able to shoot lead out of my glock 35. Basically I prime the case like i would with jacket bullets . Expand the case with a Lyman 2 Step M Expander Die, which im told me much better for reloading lead bullets ( had some problems with the rcbs expanding die and lead.) I back the crimp part of the seating die way out so it is only seating the bullet and load them to my OAL of 1.135 which cycle fine.

    now my question is how much taper crimp do i need to put on this rounds. My understanding is i just need to get rid of the extra bell left over from the expander die, but i dont see any of this.

    I took 50 of these rounds to the range today and had no problems with feeding.

    Doing a barrel test they fall in just fine just by dropping them, i can get them to fall back out, but they are not hard to get out.

    I am using mixed range brass and badmans 180gn FP bullets. (http://www.badmanbullets.com/OnlineStore/40-180-fp.html)

    if i measure the case i get .009-.010 thickness of the walls, the bullet is .041. the completed round is .420 - .422. so assuming the different cases are different thicknesses im ending up with about 0 bell after the case is crimped.

    Im kinda concerned about bullet setback because .40 is a high pressure round to begin with. So how do you guys handle your taper crimps?
     
  2. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    Here is a picture of the bullets
     

    Attached Files:


  3. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    Measure a couple of factory rounds then adjust your taper to match.
     
  4. GilaDan

    GilaDan New Member

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    Kraj, I reload for 4 different 40's. Congrats on your Lone wolf barrel! I have a Glock and HK that I don't shoot lead reloads though. I have reasonable good results with cast bullets in my PX4 and excellent results in my CX4. I use similar cast bullets at 180 grain. Your picture of the loads looks good. I like the truncated shape, they seem to feed better in the semi-autos.

    I struggled with the same crimping issue on the 40. Since chambers are different in every gun, I needed to find the ideal OAL and crimp to work in all 4 guns. I recommend having the carbon crimping die. It takes care of most of the crimp issue as the load goes up into the die - the carbon ring at the entrance. As far as how much crimp, I try to crimp as little as possible. I back the die setting off and run the load all the way into the die. Then I screw down the setting until I feel the bullet. Then I go about 1/4 turn further down and try that first.
    Continue doing your barrel test and/or cycling them. If test firing proves OK you should be good to go. If not, you can run them back through the crimp die and take the setting down a little further.
    The OAL I have settled with that works in all my guns is NTE - 2.84mm's, not sure what that is in inches. Good Luck
     
  5. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Active Member

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    I think you are fine if they drop into the barrel ok. You dont want to over crimp because that can cause leading of the barrel. As long as you sized the cases properly you should not have to worry about set back. I think you are good to go from what you said.

    I load 170 grain lead trunciated cone bullets for my Sigma 40 S&W. I pour my own lead. I pour them really soft too. If you end up with lead in the barrel get a chore boy pot scrubber. They are pure copper. Cut one into squares. Wrap it around a cleaning brush. Run it through the barrel dry. No lube at all. Run it back and forth for about 30 seconds. Get it going pretty fast. It will pull all of the lead out that fast. Then clean as ussual. Barrels are made to shoot copper jacketed bullets. You are not going to damage it by doing it by hand. Just be sure to use a real chore boy that is copper. Dont use the cheap stainless steel imitations.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  6. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    Thanks guys, ive cycled them through a couple times and the length stays the same. It just feels weird not crimping them at all. But if it works it works.

    I tried some SWC cast bullets because they were the only kind of lead my LGS's had in stock. They were pretty terrible. The lube made a mess of my dies, the SWC didnt feed reliably, and they didnt look nice. Glad i found these ones online. (for less money too)
     
  7. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member

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    So, you did not crimp that batch at all? Not the best plan. Back out the seater stem and run a loaded round into the seat/crimp die. Adjust the die down til you get contact with the case. Screw it in another 1/8 turn. Look at the case mouth. You should see about 1/10 - 1/8" of crimp at the mouth. NO MORE THAN THAT.
     
  8. string1946

    string1946 New Member

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    Crimp

    I would cycle a few rounds through the gun manually several times measure the COL before and after and if the bullet is not being set back deeper into the case during the trip into the barrel and they cycle fine then your good to go. The main thing is that the case is holding the bullet tight enough so it can get pushed deeper in the case as that can cause you pressure issues.
     
  9. InDefenseofLiberty

    InDefenseofLiberty New Member

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    These bullets did a beautiful job for me. I will be buying them again. http://precisionbullets.com
    No real worry about leading with the moly either.
    I put a light crimp on all my lead loads. Key word is LIGHT, if it's holding in the casing during cycling that is all you need.
     
  10. locutus

    locutus New Member

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    Just get a LEE "Factory Crimp Die" and be done with it.

    Easy to use and almost impossible to screw up with.:)
     
  11. Kraj

    Kraj New Member

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    I was told not to use a factory crimp die with lead bullets because it could crush the bullet?


    From the Dardas casting website (where i got the idea for the different expanding die which works great)

    "Please do not use factory crimp dies for cast bullet reloading. Cast bullets MUST remain in their pristine state in order to shoot accurately. Factory crimp dies will decrease the cast bullet's sized diameter and thus will cause many unwanted issues"
     
  12. locutus

    locutus New Member

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    There may be some truth to that if you're using extremely accurate, low velocity target type loads.

    But using a light crimp with the FCD has never caused me any problems.