Civil War History In your family

Discussion in 'History' started by bigdean65, May 22, 2013.

  1. bigdean65

    bigdean65 New Member

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    How many here know some history about their family during the Civil War?

    Doesn't matter what side Blue or Gray, we are all friends here! ;)

    I will start it off...

    My Great-Great Grandfather Harvey Jasper Laughlin was a Sergeant in the Confederacy along with his brother George. They were both in the 3rd Missouri Calvary, Regiment I. His name appears on the Pea Ridge Civil War Memorial in Arkansas.
     
  2. Dearhunter

    Dearhunter Supporting Member

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    Are y'all talkin about the war of northern agression??:)
     

  3. bigdean65

    bigdean65 New Member

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    Yep... That is the one! LOL
     
  4. alsaqr

    alsaqr Active Member

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    Three of my Great Grandfathers from VA/WV fought in the Civil War. All were Confederates. The Great Grandfather whose last name i bear was a stone cold killer. Three of his brothers were killed in the war and a fourth (civilian) starved to death after being interned in the federal prison camp at Camp Chase, OH. The captain of the federal home guard in Barbour county, WV was one Michael J. Haller. Haller was infamous for sending innocent civilians off to federal prison. Just after the end of the war some of the old Confederates, including my Great Grandfather, caused a ruckus to draw out the Barbour home guard. Captain Michael Haller was killed.

    i have an archive copy of the WV home guard letter announcing the death of captain Michael J. Haller but can't get it on the web here.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    A relative of mine from Georgia led an average soldier's service for the South. He served with neither extraordinary distinction nor dishonor. Started out as a basic private, and was promoted to corporal before finally walking home after the war (I think from Virginia).

    Ironically, according to family history, he had a harder time getting home, than he had fighting in the war. He mostly was fighting disease and infection from multiple injuries sustained in battle, not to mention the crippling effect of a leg wound from a northern saber.

    All in all, no great extraordinary story. He made it home, taking nearly a year, recovered for a while, and went back to his quiet life on the farm.

    His brother (my great grandfather), who was much younger than him (this great grand uncle was in his twenties during the war, great grandfather was 10 when his older brother left home), later left the Georgia homestead for Mississippi, where he continued sharecropping for a while, until he was one of the few who actually made a profit taking on that challenge of legal white slavery, and eventually bought a 5 acre plot that he farmed himself, adding acreage with his profits until he had a couple sections to pass down through the family.

    Now a coal mine has dug it all up, but my mother's family gets to bid on it all (the money is already in an account) when the coal is depleted, with a mutual understanding amongst the locals that no one will bid against any land that's originally family owned. And outsiders who try, will be dealt with accordingly.

    A little beyond civil war, sorry, but it seemed pertinent at the moment.
     
  6. rachilders

    rachilders New Member

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    My fathers family also came from Georgia (the Atlanta area) and had pretty much the same life as the earlier poster. Most of my dads family still live there. I remember visiting my great-grand mother there in the 1950's. She was in her 90's by then but still remembered seeing Sherman's army as a small girl when they marched through the Atlanta area. My father moved to Charlotte, NC after WWII, met my mother and they lived there the rest of their lives.

    My mothers family has lived in the Charlotte area since the 1700's, fought in the Revolutionary war and for the south during the Civil War. My great-great-grand mother was married to a colonel who was killed during the war. After the war was over she married his brother and they raised a family. FWIW she had children by both men and since the fathers were brothers, the children had the same last name and relatives. That also made them not just bro/sis but cousins as well. Gives a whole new meaning to "keeping it all in the family." As a side note, when she died, my GGGM was buried next to the first husband. My brother and two sisters still live in the Charlotte area as well as several of my adult children. The great-great-grandfather who died in the war is buried there along with my GGGM and the gravestones are still visible and readable.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 23, 2013
  7. bigdean65

    bigdean65 New Member

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    I just love old family history like this. Great stuff!!! Thanks for the replies so far! :)

    My Great-Great Grandfather's Father was killed by a Union bushwhacker... it is what made he and his brother sign up.
     
  8. Bravo_Sixx

    Bravo_Sixx New Member

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    I have some history back to the 1600's but the Civil War I had a relative that fought along-side Nathan Bedford Forrest.
     
  9. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    My Fathers side of the family was here before this was a country. It was said that when Daniel Boone come to the wild west of Ky they where to say get off my land!:eek: To this day there are a ton of people with my last name in East Ky. I don't know many of them but my name is a clan name so we are all supposed to be related somehow. I have met a few. It's real interesting to get the look that I"m an outsider but my name is well known.

    AS to the war I honestly don't now if any served but I"m sure some did. It seems when my Dads Dad left that area for northern Ky there was not much if any contact wit hthe peopel in the east anymore. We're notorious for not getting along it seems as a family.:eek: WE did have family in WW1, WWII, and Korea. That goes back ot my grandfather, my Dad, and one uncle. Knowing my great grandfathers history though I'd say if we had family in the civil war they where with the south. My great grand dad would no tallow a black man to walk on th esame side of the street as him so it's kind of easy to make the assumption. But I have no hard evidence.

    My Moths side go there just after the war so they had nothing to do wit hit.
     
  10. bigdean65

    bigdean65 New Member

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    Even farther on back in mine, I have some that fought in the Revolutionary War after they arrived in the America's in 1746. I have a copy of my GGGGrandfather's last will and testament. It is pretty interesting reading... he stated who was getting what slave and a little of everything. He received a large piece of land for his service fighting the British.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    Part of my family goes back to Bacon's Rebellion here in VA. As far as the Civil War- Ancestor on Mom's side- James Pleasants. Great grandad was Regimental butcher (kept the troops fed). I still have his mustering out pay. My mother was born at Little Dover plantation, next door to Sabot Hill.

    About Corporal Pleasants- do NOT touch his horses!
    From Wikipedia, Goochland County VA.

    Almost 100 years after Cornwallis marched his army through Goochland, the county was the site of another battle. By the year 1864, the young Union Colonel Ulric Dahlgren was a distinguished officer. He had a daring plan to secretly infiltrate central Virginia, liberate nearly 12,000 Union prisoners on Belle Isle in Richmond, the Confederate capital, and destroy the city. On March 1, 1864, Dahlgren's forces reached Sabot Hill, Dover, and Eastwood in eastern Goochland.[4]

    Eastwood was then occupied by Plumer Hobson and his wife, the daughter of Brigadier General Henry A. Wise. On the previous night General Wise had arrived at Eastwood. When a Union detail arrived at Eastwood looking for him, his daughter said that he was in Charleston, South Carolina. Instead, he was riding rapidly southeast to Richmond to warn the troops of the Union raiders.[4] Dahlgren went to Sabot Hill, the home of James Seddon and his wife, who answered the door and invited the officer in for some wine and Southern hospitality. She knew that Wise was on his way to Richmond and wanted to delay Dahlgren. Ultimately, due to the quick thinking by the families in Goochland, Wise was able to warn forces in Richmond and defeat Dahlgren's raid.[4]

    When the war broke out, James Pleasants, a native of the county, insisted he replace his uncle in the Goochland Light Dragoons (known during the war as Co. F, 4th Virginia Cavalry). In 1861, he was allowed to take his uncle's place. In the winter of 1864, any troops who were close to home were allowed to return to recruit more soldiers. On Pleasants' first night home, Dahlgren's raiders stole his horses but did not search the property. When Pleasants found out what happened, he grabbed his carbine and started off on foot after the raiders. Hearing a noise, he hid in the woods, and then ordered the Union cavalryman to surrender. Pleasants mounted the man's horse, and forced the soldier to walk in front of him to search for more soldiers. Within a short amount of time, Pleasants had captured several Union prisoners and took them as prisoners back to Bowles' store. In all, he captured 15 Union soldiers, recovered 16 horses, and shot one officer who refused to surrender.[4]
     
  12. DFlynt

    DFlynt New Member

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    Had a couple of distant family serve with one of the Indiana Regiments, basically they mustered in and were discharged like 6 months later, they never saw combat.
     
  13. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    Supposedly I am related to the great Abraham Lincoln. I haven't done the research but that is what my family and parents tell me.
     
  14. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Ya know, with your name, social, bank account numbers and routing numbers, I can tell you anything you want to know. But you might want to PM that to me, can't risk having that info falling into the wrong hands... ;)
     
  15. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    ................
     
  16. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    :p. lol ha
     
  17. john300k

    john300k New Member

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    My great-great Grandfather was taught by Clara Barton in New Jersey before the war. There are several books that mention him as being a bully in school. Ms. Barton some how made him cry and he became one of her favorite students. They were reunited at Gettysburg where he had been shot and she stumbled across him with the other wounded men. After the war they were close friends and my Great Grandmother was named Clara after Ms. Barton.
    I have all of his military paperwork and his Officers Cavalry sword. He was promote in the field from private all the way to Capitan. He was a carpenter by trade and I have all of his tools in his custom made tool box.
     
  18. F4U

    F4U New Member

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    Having that stuff is really cool. I have my great grandfathers toolbox also. He was kept out of WWI by flat feet. :eek: He had done the historical research and traced his family back to the revolution. He and his daughter (my grandmother) were members of the sons/daughters of the revolution. But all of his research disappeared after his death so I don't know if any ancesters fought in the civil war.
     
  19. locutus

    locutus New Member

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    Two of my Great Grandfathers fought in the civil war

    One served with the 12th Louisiana Dragoons, and the other with the 2nd Texas Rangers.

    But that war has been over for 148 years. The great issues of that day were decided once and for all time on the battlefield. It's over folks.
     
  20. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Its not over. The results of the Civil War are still painfully present today. The Civil War saw the end of America as our founding fathers saw it. State Rights were destroyed as a result of the war, and is one of the reasons we have the oversized glutton of a government we have today.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2013