Bird Pest Control

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by tCan, Oct 2, 2011.

  1. tCan

    tCan New Member

    1,173
    0
    0
    There are lots of Cardinals, some Robins and even a Bluejay living in the woods behind my apartment. There are a couple doves too, but they don't get too close. We've got some feeders on our porch but a flock of sparrows chases off the other birds so we don't get to see them often. I popped one today with my pellet gun and even with the bird in my hand I couldn't tell if it was a House Sparrow or a Tree Sparrow.

    Does anyone know if native American sparrows are aggressive like that? I know the House Sparrow, which is non-native definitely is aggressive. I would feel better about popping these birds if I knew for sure they weren't native.

    Hopefully I can get the sparrow flock to move on without scaring the birds of color away.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2011
  2. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    You're never going to get rid of the sparrows. If you are putting a bird feeder out, you're going to have to get used to the fact ALL birds are going to feed from it. You are going to get a lot of the less attractive birds but you will also see the prettier ones. In my opinion, if you are going to feed the birds, just enjoy watching the birds eat.

    Another way to attract the more desirable birds is to use feeders that attract specific birds. Get a squirrel proof peanut feeder to attract that Blue Jay. Get a safflower seed feeder or sunflower seed feeder to attract the cardinals. Get a thistle seed feeder to attract goldfinches, etc. I have fed the birds for many years now and have a variety of feeder styles and seeds/suet to appeal to specific birds. My yard gets vary interesting during migration. We get all kinds of unusual visitors that are passing through. If you are buying that mixed seed sort of stuff from the grocery store, you are going to get a lot of sparrows.
     

  3. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    Also, doves are ground feeders. They will not feed from a feeder hung from anything. They will feed UNDER the feeder that the other birds scatter out of the feeder. And you won't find a much more aggessive bird out there than that Blue Jay. I've seen them attack my cats when the cats get too close to their babies just out of the nest.
     
  4. tCan

    tCan New Member

    1,173
    0
    0
    I've noticed that behavior with the doves. But even so they don't come around much. I know the Jay is aggressive, but it is native. I don't know really why I feel this way, but with birds, I would much rather leave the native species alone unless I'm going for meat.
     
  5. BenLuby

    BenLuby New Member

    2,181
    0
    0
    Best advice offered yet. I can't shoot something that isn't for a dinner plate. Learned that lesson as a kid, never forgot it. Shot a crow just because I had a gun in hand...and my uncle, who saw it, made me clean and eat the damn thing.
    So...if I shoot an animal, it's going to be dinner.
    Thanks for the advice, winds. Maybe some sparrows can buzz some more cats!!
     
  6. tCan

    tCan New Member

    1,173
    0
    0
    Well...

    :D
     
  7. tCan

    tCan New Member

    1,173
    0
    0
    Shot and cooked a house sparrow before breakfast this morning. I scored a headshot (could see bone and goop which I'm assuming was brain). It was the first time I'd ever cleaned an animal and when I dropped it on the counter it kinda squeaked. At this point I noticed it was still breathing :eek:. I know it's biologically possible for an animal to be dead and still breathe but dang, not cool. After a hasty decapitation follows me plucking and then attempting to cut the skin back from the breast. It took me a good 5 minutes to figure out that without a razor sharp knife, it was not going to be neat. Even a serrated blade wasn't working. And once I managed that when I pierced the breast it squeaked again (and I jumped :eek:) but I eventually managed to get two little thumbnail sized cuts out of the breast.

    Fried in oil and salted it's not offensive. Gamey, beef kind of flavor, kinda chewy. Not a bad experience overall. At least now I know that skin is tougher than it looks.
     
  8. 762

    762 New Member

    507
    0
    0
    yum! lol.....me and a buddy used to shoot and cook doves when we were in college. i know what you mean about them squeaking, it startled us the first time until we figured out why it was doing that.

    just remember to not shoot the cardinals, they're our state bird!! the tree huggers would be all over you!!! lol
     
  9. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member


    Was it worth all that effort for that tiny piece of meat?


    Why DO they do that?
     
  10. 762

    762 New Member

    507
    0
    0
    well i guess i should say we assumed we knew why it was happening. but it's really just a guess. we were thinking that air was trapped in their lungs. if we were to squeeze them it would force the air out. we were both industrial design majors though, not biology, so we have no idea what we're talking about.
     
  11. tCan

    tCan New Member

    1,173
    0
    0
    Sure! Though more for the experience than the meat. I'd have to be pretty hungry to do it again.

    I am. The syrinx (vocal area) of a bird has ridged (as in bumpy, not stiff) membranes in the bottom of the trachea. Muscles modulate the tension and thus tone of the sound. It is possible for air to remain in the lungs. Since small birds don't have a lot of mass, you wouldn't expect the weight of the carcass to force the air out as you might in say a deer.

    If you put pressure on the chest (cutting/dropping) then it would force the air across this region. Now, having said that, I still can't tell you if that's what's actually making the sound. Their may have to be a specific type of tension on the syrinx for it to make any sound - birds don't squeak every time they breath.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2011
  12. 762

    762 New Member

    507
    0
    0
    makes sense to me.