Am I too small for my favorite shotgun

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by wendydelane76, Sep 8, 2013.

  1. wendydelane76

    wendydelane76 New Member

    4
    0
    0
    I'm new on here and just looking for some advice or opinions. I have been shooting the same shotgun for the last five here during every dove, and turkey season. I am 5'2, 103 lbs and I shoot a Remington 1100. I have never had any trouble, injury, or anything other than a slight bruise on opening day of the season. This year I test shot 2 boxes of shells that morning because the gun had started hanging up and not kicking the shells out at the end of the season last year. Of course, it hung up with me and did not open at all the kick the shell out. I'm not sure why but it felt like a mule kicked me and was bruised and sore the following week. I hunted the day it happened and it did not seem like there was a serious problem Today I used the same shotgun (my dad fixed it), and was fine most of the day. I shot several times back to back almost straight up in the air. Within an hour I was in excruciating pain and could not even lift the shotgun or raise my are to drive home. Has anyone ever heard of a person damaging their shoulder with a shotgun? The recoil is not that bad on an 1100 and has never hurt me before. Could it be a positioning issue or a LOP issue? It has not been modified and I know the stock is a little to long.
     
  2. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

    14,922
    0
    0
    You should have it fitted for you. Too long of a stock can cause problems like you describe, but outside of that you may have just had a bad mount on it for one shot and then every subsequent shot was beating you up even more.

    I just Googled "shotgun Fitting" and came up with this video. Does a good job of explaining it. More often than not people will get length of pull adjusted and stop there (and you can do that and have good results), but the rest of it is also important for a good fit.

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLLnGM3DXE0[/ame]

    How old are you? Are you still growing?
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2013

  3. JW357

    JW357 New Member

    6,716
    0
    0
    Wish I could help with your shotgun issue. But it sounds like Vikingdad is on the right track.


    If you're gonna stick around on the forums please go by the introduction thread and say hi.

    Hi, by the way. :)
     
  4. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,423
    0
    0
    Do you have a recoil pad on that shotgun? Is it cleaned regularly. I, too, am short and I think having the correct LOP makes a HUGE difference in shooting properly. I agree with Vikingdad. If the LOP is too long, you aren't going to be able to shoulder the shotgun properly and it's reaaaally gonna hurt. Have it fitted to you at a gunsmith. I want you to enjoy that favorite shotgun. Or consider buying a youth model shotgun. I have a youth model Henry Lever. It fits me perfectly.

    By the way, I'm glad you joined us here. Do go introduce yourself in the Introduction thread. I'm a woman, too, and if I can help you out in getting around on the forum, let me know. I'm glad to help.
     
  5. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

    7,510
    0
    0
    Agree with the others, the weapons gotta be fitted to your frame and unless its custom, its probably designed for a 6' Human. A nice shock pad helps also!

    Also your possibly correct about a full sized 12 gauge being a bit more than you may want to use often for your frame. A lighter semi 12 can slam a shooters shoulder pretty hard even if your stock weld and butt placement postures are perfect. Firing a box of high brass in my Ithaca featherweight makes my shoulder sore just thinking of it (not a Semi)! On the other hand, I can fire my grandads Model 11 semi all day long and not feel it later, Im 6'1", (only if I can hold it up all day long, shes a heavy sonavagun). A Model 1100, 16 gauge might be more fun and less pain.

    Welcome Wendy, glad to have you here on the FTF!
     
  6. Virginian

    Virginian New Member

    1,079
    0
    0
    Welcome Wendy. Is it a 12 gauge or a 20? Does it have a recoil pad? Have you had an experienced shotgunner watch you shoot it? Unless you are extremely lanky, I would guess the LOP is too long for you. If you have a pretty walnut stock, you might want to buy an adjustable length of pull synthetic stock and try different lengths until you decide what fits you best, and then get your walnut stock cut with a good recoil pad installed and sell the synthetic one. Lots of people have become exceptional shots without a professional stock fitting. A stock without a recoil pad can hurt if you fire the gun with it not properly positioned, even an 1100. You might look here:
    http://www.ebay.com/dsc/Shotgun-/73954/i.html?_sop=10&_nkw=remington+1100+stock&_frs=1
    Good luck.
     
  7. wendydelane76

    wendydelane76 New Member

    4
    0
    0
    Thanks everyone for the input.
    Vikingdad, to answer your question, I am not still growing. I wish! I'm 36 and have been this same size since I was about 14. LOL! I did not want to mess with the original stock on the gun since it is old, but my dad has found a spare stock in his old gun shop and is going to shorten and change it out for me. He said he may try weighting the stock with lead also. I don't have a problem with it being too heavy now, but he thinks it may be too front heavy for me and adding weight to the back may balance.
     
  8. bluez

    bluez Active Member

    1,606
    0
    36
    I know the shotgun subforum is full of quality shotgun fans and valuable advice has been given and I (an AR guy) learned a lot in this thread.

    BUT my 2 cents... 12 gauge is a LOT of recoil...in order to be proficient one has to be comfortable enough to shoot it a lot which is diffcult in high recoil wepons for all but the larger males.

    Too much recoil in it to a 100 lbs person, even if you never had a problem before.
    To top things off from the OP's screename and the height/weight I deduce the OP is female.

    That means not just less mass to absorb shock but all bones/tendons are not as "heavy duty" as with a male.
    AND as a female you lack the protective effects high levels testosterone have on reducing injuries and healing them quicker.

    I know modern american culture has conditioned us to ignore the physical realities when it comes to genders and there will always be a story of ( such and champion is female bla bla) but IMHO a high recoil weapon like a 12 gauge shotgun may not be the right choice for the OP at all.

    Fot example I never even allow women and children to fire my 50 Beowulf whose recoil is roughly the same, ,ok maybe slightly higher but not much, as I worry about broken collar bones etc.

    (i'm gonna run and hide now before the horders with pitchforks come after me ..:eek: )
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2013
  9. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

    14,922
    0
    0
    Wendy,
    At your age I would go ahead and have the gun properly fitted with whatever stock came with it. If this is the shotgun you will be primarily using it needs to fit you properly. Don't underestimate the importance of this. I understand the tendency to not want to alter the original equipment, but that is much easier than altering your body to properly fit the shotgun, plus, that is why they make stocks available in the aftermarket. Weighting might also help, but if it feels balanced to you then be careful with that. Too much weight on a long day will hurt as much as too much recoil.

    The next thing I would recommend is reloading. That way you can custom tailor your loads to what you are comfortable shooting.

    Hope this helps!
     
  10. Virginian

    Virginian New Member

    1,079
    0
    0
    Sounds like your Dad is on the right track to me. The interchangeability of Remington stocks is a blessing. I swapped stocks on my LT20 Skeet gun when my daughters were first learning.
     
  11. BillM

    BillM New Member

    1,144
    0
    0
    Agreed with everyone--mod the gun to fit you. However, you have been shooting it for 5 years
    with no problems?

    I suspect that when the gun malfunctioned, you got the full recoil of the gun with none of the
    recoil softening that gas operated guns are known for. You did some damage. Continuing
    to hammer away at the doves probably isn't a good plan. Might be time to visit the doctor.
     
  12. wendydelane76

    wendydelane76 New Member

    4
    0
    0
    Vikingdad, I really appreciate your input. My dad is actually a retired gunsmith and I didn't want to upset him by telling him the gun had hurt me. But, it was swollen today so it was obvious. I know he has had that gun along time and I was going to just buy a new one rather than modify that one. Well, today he told me he was cutting off the original stock to fit me (the original is prettier), measured my LOP, and ordered a new recoil pad for it. There is only a hard butt plate on it now. He even called me later and asked if I wanted a pink recoil pad instead. I knew he could modify it perfectly for me, but I didn't want him to have to tamper with his gun just because I like it. It's always seemed a little long and I had to swing out and then up to get it on my shoulder but I didn't realize it could hurt me. I'm gonna have to practice shooting right handed the rest of the week for the shoot on Saturday now......even if it feels a little better by then I don't want to make it worse.

    Thanks everyone for the comments.

    Also,
    Bluez,
    I have a 20 ga and I hate it. I have tried my brothers 16 ga and it has more kick than the 12 ga. As a very general rule you may be partly right, but each make and model varies in recoil. I also worked as a personal trainer/fitness club manager and never read in any of my books that a mans bones and tendons are "tougher" than a woman. (IT TAKES 160 PSI OF PRESSURE TO BREAK A HUMAN BONE. MALE OR FEMALE.) Stronger, yes, absolutely. But you don't have to be able to bench press 200 lbs to hold a shotgun properly. However, I appreciate your input all the same.

    Thanks everyone!
     
  13. bluez

    bluez Active Member

    1,606
    0
    36
    Wendy,

    try this:

    grab your collarbone with your thumb and trigger finger and feel the thickness.
    Then try the same on a husband or bf.

    The collarbone diameter will be about double, which means about 4x the force is needed to break the bone.
     
  14. Virginian

    Virginian New Member

    1,079
    0
    0
    Just curious Wendy, is that 20 you hate a Remington 1100 LT-20? I am an 1100 lover and the LT-20 is a favorite of mine. I shoot it for almost everything but ducks anymore.
     
  15. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    0
    0
    Small people can handle a 12 ga with low recoil ammo. Most people that shoot a lot reload their own shotshells. You can make a load that is about the same as a 20 ga or you can buy low recoil shells if you do not roll your own. A shotgun that fits is a great beginning and it's not that terribly expensive to have a stock cut down. Once I decide I am going to keep a shotgun I get it fitted, even my Mossberg 500 has been fitted.
     
  16. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc New Member

    6,902
    0
    0
    Since your dad is a retired gunsmith, he could also take a look at your gas system. The rings in there may need a change. This could help with the recoil just by having ghe gas system working properly.

    The other possibility is that by having the incorrect length of pull a tthe time of injury, and a extreme upward shot could have put most of the force on your collar bone or on the acromioclavicular joint, instead of in the pocket of the shoulder. This could have caused a bone contusion or partial AC joint separation (kind of like a bad sprain. It could explain the swelling, pain and partial loss of mobility. It could set you up for easy reinjury for the next couple of weeks or so. If it is getting better pretty rapidly, then it is porbably not fo major concern, and not as serious an injury as those listed above. But if the pain is pretty persistent, you may want to lay off for a bit, and get it checked out by a doctor.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor. Just a Navy Independent Duty Corpsman (Submarines). So, most of my advice includes advice to get things checked by a doctor. Also, it is not normally my style to give advice without seeing an injury in person. So, really this is just me suggesting not ignoring the problem if your pain persists. Shoulders are a pretty complex joint, and they are pretty important to a lot of day to day activities, so you want any injury to heal right, and heal quickly.

    Good luck on the shotgun and getting better.
     
  17. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

    3,210
    0
    0
    Also consider purchasing a good shoulder recoil pad. I work with ladies your size who have to shoot our full size range 870s for qualification and the ones who buy these always get better scores and almost never bruise up. I've seen them on amazon in the $30 range.

    image-409409278.jpg

    (Not saying get THIS particular shoulder pad. Just including it as an example so you'd be able to see what I was talking about. I don't know what brand the ladies at work use.)

    They make quite a number of different pads, even a few that slip under your bra strap so nobody can tell if you're wearing one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
  18. wendydelane76

    wendydelane76 New Member

    4
    0
    0
    Thanks guys and girls. My brother changed out the stock on his 16 ga and let me try it out yesterday. It fit me much better. My dad changed the rings and drooled out the holes in the barrel on his 12 ga a couple weeks ago for me. I think the major problem was the length of the stock. He should have that fixed for me next week. Yay! I'm gonna use the 16 ga this weekend but having to shoot right handed till my should heals should be interesting. And thanks for the advise about the recoil pads. My dad found a nice one online.
     
  19. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,423
    0
    0
    I'm glad it's all working out. Happy hunting.
     
  20. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    0
    0
    You can find a gun that fits you I have no doubt. My niece is tiny. She can tack at 108 (her plus the saddle and helmet). She shoots a lot when she has time. She likes the 12" hogue overmolded stock for shooting slugs and buckshot. She gets her wood stocks fitted to her. Most gunsmiths that do stockwork are not that expensive. They have tools that make cutting a stock down and fitting a recoil pad a quick job.

    The first gun I had fitted I spent more on renting a trial gun and paying my gunsmiths skeet tab than I spent on labor. You don't have to haul a gunsmith to a skeet range to get a gun fitted. Most gunsmiths have an area where you can shoot a static target and the gunsmith will get all the info he needs to fit the stock to you.