A little late, but I've finally started...

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by StainlessSteel215, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. StainlessSteel215

    StainlessSteel215 New Member

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    I'm going to be VERY honest....up until a couple weeks ago I considered this "crazy prepping mentality" for a long time as people who were just paranoid or nuts. Placed full faith in our government to prevent economic collapse/civil unrest, but now Im being much more realistic. Things can happen. Well, after seeing what has unfolded over the last week after Sandy struck nearby....I watched people's lives collapse who were 100% dependent on media, electricity, and local comforts such as supermarkets, gas stations, police, etc.

    Well, in a "secure" region such as NJ/NYC I'm here to report that as of yesterday there were still nearly 80k without power...some are completely homeless and living at shelters. Its bad. Looting and invasions have happened...but according to the reports Ive read it wasnt nearly as bad as some of the conspiracy theorists have tried to pretend. But still.....these people are stuck and some are getting desperate. And as you will see in this link....one opportunistic criminal man can do a LOT of damage in a tragedy like this....he's possibly responsible for 12 home invasions & robberies in fact:

    http://www.nbcnewyork.com/video/#!/...Homes-During-Sandy-Blackout--Police/179048251

    So.....fast forward to now. I literally JUST begun to build a supply of water, canned food, ammo & supplies. My prepping consists of 2 parts: building up a supply of food and supplies at my home to keep myself, my wife and 1 year old daughter fed for at least 3 months.....and building a decent BUG bag if I need to flee. I am building as fast as my finances allow...I refuse to go broke building up my cache so I have to simply add to the supply little by little.

    Happy prepping, cant believe it took me so long but I'm in! Will update with details as my plan takes shape
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2012
  2. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    Welcome. What some call paranoia our grandparents and/or great grandparents called common sense. Then Americans became soft and complacent if not ignorant. OK, delusional! It is irresponsible for a person, especially the head of a household, to be unprepared for the basics.

    People can get swept up. Plan your preps and work the plan. Slow but steady wins the race. A suggestion...

    Don't get caught starting preps for being snowed-in for a few days when you want months of supplies. Find out what that means. Such as what are going to make up the 600,000 calories you'll want for those months?

    Good luck.
     

  3. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Funny you should mention "grandparents". My attitude about prepping comes from my late grandmother, and you described her attitude to a "T". She never thought of it as anything other than common sense. She always kept a pantry full of canned food and plenty of extra water. I still remember as a kid helping her fill jugs with water. She also always told me not to trust banks and to buy gold. I sure do wish that I had listened to her sooner. :)

    She always had very simple way of viewing the world. The older I get the more I realize how insightful her simple view of the world was.
     
  4. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    An excellent place for information (and some fellowship) is the sister site to this one. It is found here---

    www.preparedsociety.com

    Just like here, it is a great bunch of people.
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Barack-Obama-Shushing.jpg

    My minions and sycophants are listening.
     
  6. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    Now how come nobody told me about this sight sooner. Well better late than never I guess.
     
  7. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    Best of luck getting started. I'm not overwhelmingly prepared, but at least I have somewhat of a "plan" and a few supplies. One thing I have realized is that it's pretty costly.
     
  8. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    From the title of your thread I thought you were worried about being pregnant. :D
     
  9. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    Hahahaha :D I thought that that too, but I didn't say anything.
     
  10. StainlessSteel215

    StainlessSteel215 New Member

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    lol nope...but funny you should say that as my wife is 12 weeks as we speak with our second ;)

    Just picked up a second 4-shelf storage shelf for the basement....beginning to fill it up each week and picking up an extra 2 boxes of ammo for home storage with each range trip. My grab bag will be the most expensive thing to fill up.... got a few basic medical supplies, survival tools in it already
     
  11. jpl714

    jpl714 New Member

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    While I have been slow to build preps thru a divorce and i did build an extensive medical stockpile and have many needed supplies. Food is mostly my need but we all start somewhere ... I guess on my fat reserves I'm good for six months or so
     
  12. Kai

    Kai New Member

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    It's funny to read about people "prepping" and the qualms about prepping and reasons for prepping.
    Many people have prepped for centuries/decades...My grandparents were preppers...grandpa had a 2 acre garden and raised chickens as well as a 2 acre vineyard that gave us port wine.
    He and grandma canned and bottled veggies to last throughout the winter months.
    They did not have the emergency survival stuff available today but they were prepping for hard times when money would be tight and some food stuffs not available...like vegetables in the winter. I remember this as a child in the early 60's...born in '55.
    My mom also did some prepping at the same time. Living along the SE coast of MA we had a lot of hurricanes. No power and sometimes water problems. She would fill the bath tub with water when a storm was coming. We always had a supply of hurricane candles and kerosene lanterns...cool to use as a kid.
    Their prepping was more for tight money times and weather related storm problems.

    But those, in my opinion, are the basic reasons for all of us to prep. Tight financial times, storms, etc. are the basic problems we WILL face in some fashion or another. They are predictable and we should all have preps to get us through them.
    The other prepping reasons...war, epidemic, societal fall, etc...are all rolls of the dice and some may spends many thousands of dollars only to see time pass with none of the expected calamities befall. It is a roll of the dice and being prepared is better than no preparations but I do wonder if there is a line...I suppose that line is up to each of us and I'd rather it that way than relying on government agencies to support us. Their current track record...recent hurricane Sandy...demonstrates that they are still slow to respond with often the wrong help when it is needed...funny how bureaucrats work that way and can get away with it isn't it???...so we rely upon ourselves, families, friends and community to deal with our problems and help as needed and able.

    My wife and I are prepared for emergencies. We have what we feel is adequate food and water supplies to last us 30 to 90 days with conservations. We also have emergency supplies and gear to take us through loss of power, etc. for a reasonable amount of time. We feel we are adequately prepared.
     
  13. StainlessSteel215

    StainlessSteel215 New Member

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    Kai, thats precisely why I built (2) 4-tiered shelves in the basement that are now half stocked with food and water...and a few supplies just in case. I am not expecting zombies, nazi's, apocalypse, etc. What I AM preparing for are exactly the things you mentioned.....emergencies. I had my power knocked out for 5 days due to Sandy and was caught with my pants down. That wont happen again. It was a learning curve for me
     
  14. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    Interesting perspectives you two.

    But cushioning oneself from just an otherwise perfect life is a start, not a destination or definition of preparedness, at least to a "prepper." Thinking about the longer-term implications of (probably, hopefully) less-likely but more dramatic and drastic situations and planning for them too is simply responsible. The appropriate attitude and investment in knowledge, skills, physical preparation and practice? Priceless insurance. When nothing else will do you cannot rely on anything else.

    Hope is not a practical program for anything which I know you've started to recognize...
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2012
  15. Kai

    Kai New Member

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    Well said Hockalouis.
    I'm prepared for the general emergencies but my stuff is also capable of carrying me through all emergencies from natural to man made of any sort...more or less...I have no anti nuclear fallout medicine, etc. and I'm not sure I want any. But stuff like that is worth looking into.
    I do have a lot of learning materials for surviving a variety of difficulties and that is better than nothing.

    I also live in an area where it is very easy to live off the land, small populations, close to a major Army base, small close knit community/village full of hunters, military, etc., farms of all sorts. So in a worst case scenario this village will survive and do well...We hope...

    Most of us, including me, are skilled in a variety of skills that will translate quite well into a survival community.
     
  16. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    That pretty well describes most of my prepping. I tend to focus more on being self sufficient and not just for potential hard times. There is a feeling of satisfaction that comes with being more self sufficient. There are also other benefits for example you eat better and healthier food from your garden than from the grocery store. Plus it saves a lot of money even in good times. From there it's not that difficult to prep for even worse long term situations. For me it all goes back to the basics: water, food, and shelter. The better you are at providing those three things the better off you are no matter what.:)