220 Swift Anyone?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by hoovco, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    I'm thinking my next rifle is going to be chambered in 220 swift. Anybody have a rifle in this caliber? How do you like it?
     
  2. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    Wish i did an a 257 roberts like a win feather light bolt lol pawn got it
     

  3. cbibb

    cbibb New Member

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    I have one I acquired from a gun shop savage 112 It cam from an old p-dog hunter bedded ,floated and a good trigger job under one pound 36gr varget and 52gr sierra hpbt its a laser beam 3800fps less 1/2 inch drop from 100 to 200yd lots of shots through the barrel and no lose of accuracy. Its a very good round
     
  4. Jim1611

    Jim1611 New Member

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    I've never owned one but all of my shooting friends that have them love them. A bit touchy if you reload, be careful with the cases. Another great round is the 22-250 Ackley Improved. Pretty much an equal to the Swift. So many choices!! So hard to make!
     
  5. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American

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    22-250 is IMO a better choice these days. I owned and reloaded the 220 years ago and it uses a lot of powder to do what it does.
     
  6. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    Ive realy been thinking about that 22-250 for a deer rifle
     
  7. lefty2

    lefty2 New Member

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    Go for the 22-250 it will do just about anything 220 swift will it's right on it's heels, used to do alot of chuck hunting up state NY and it was one good round easy to reload, good on case life and if you don't load it hot the barrel will last you a life time. Have a Savage 112v l bough in 1976 and still a tack drive. Took it to the range after 15 years.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    I was thinking 220, 204 Ruger, or 223 WSSM. I'll check out those other rounds though.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have owned several over the years and really enjoyed shooting them. they are a blast to shoot, recoil is mild and they are super fast and accurate. but given that, i would probably suggest the 22-250 as well, simply if you reload, they will get almost as fast, very close in accuracy and use quite a bit less powder to acheive near to the results of the 220 swift. if you don't reload, ammo will be easier to find for the 22-250 and cheaper. barrel life is better with the 22-250 vs. the 220 swift as well, because not near the powder is burned in getting near the same results. as long as you know this and still want the 220 swift, then find one and enjoy it.

    i have a 204 ruger and it's a fun cartridge to shoot as well. fast and very accurate. recoil is gentle. reloads easily as well. powder goes a long ways with this small case as well! try it out.
     
  10. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    I have been shooting the .220 Swift for over 50 years. My uncles had Swifts from the get go. The Swift is the super .22 for hand loaders. The Swift is a larger engine than the .22-250 period. I have a sporter weight and HBs in the .220 Swift caliber.

    I use them for praire dogs and rock chucks. I also load the 60 and 70 gr. bullets for long range coyote and wolf loads. The .22-250 can not handle the big bullets like a Swift. If you are going to shoot the lighter bullets below 55 grs. the .22-250 is OK. If you want an all round kick a$$ super .22 get a Swift.:D
     
  11. Control

    Control New Member

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    Why is the .220 Swift a "bit touchy" for reloading?
     
  12. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Yes I have loaded 1,000s of Swift what is touchy about them?:confused: The Swift case is the off spring of the 1898 6MM Lee Navy Straight Pull rifle. This case has a long history of use. The .22 WOS became the Swift for the most part after 1937 in the then new Mdl. 70 Winchester. The .22 Woytkins Orginal Swift dates to the 1920s.

    Jerry Gebbie a California Wild Cat Ctg. shooter invented the .22 Gebbie Varmint in 1953. Remington picked it up as the .22-250. The .22-250 was a better paper Ctg. than was the .220 Swift. The .22-250 was never able to over come the Swift among the Long Range varmint shooters. The Swift like the 30-06, 45-70, .45 ACP has been declared dead many times. But it seems to rise from the ashes with every new generation of Rifleman.:)
     
  13. Jim1611

    Jim1611 New Member

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    Maybe that wasn't the best choice in words. From what I have heard from the guys I know that have these and reload for them is that you need to stay away from full length resizing of the case and if possible just use a neck sizer. Seems to extend case life. I know all cases can and will stretch but I've always read, heard and been told the Swift is more known for it.
     
  14. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    In reloading for accuracy a case is fire formed to the rifle chamber. Once the case is formed to the chamber the reloader keeps this demension by using a neck size die only.
    In any Ctg. neck sizing can extend case life by reduceing brass flow away from the case web. This is not unique to the Swift it is just advanced reloading.
     
  15. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    Na you just need to know how to anneal the case.
     
  16. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Brass should be anealed before the first fire form. This will allow a better neck and shoulder flow in the forward chamber. Rule of thumb says a case may need to be anealed after the 3rd loading. A prime idicator of hard necks is a chirpping sound when you back the expander button off.

    A case can be anealed by setting a deprimed case in water that extends to a point just below the shoulder. The neck and shoulder can be heated to a bright red and quinched in the water. I cast bullets so I use the hot lead process where the neck and shoulder are held in 800 degree lead. This gives a very even heat. There are many ways to soften necks. Anealing is only one step in proper case care.:)
     
  17. lefty2

    lefty2 New Member

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    Half the fun of getting a new or an other gun is trying to figuring out which one and what caliber and will it do what l want it to do. Buy doing research you will gain a wealth of information, have fun and post as to that you end up with.
     
  18. lefty2

    lefty2 New Member

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    l hear every one talking about what to do with a case, does any one either inside neck ream or out side neck turning a case l know l do, l in side neck ream. The primer gives me an indication as to if there is something going on, and if it didn't look right and l didn't change my load and if the expander button is tight
    that means brass flow and there is no other way to cure or fix this problem other then reaming or turning; l learned this the had way; l was flattering primers and had excess pressure l was new to this game of reloading in the early 70s so after a half dozens reloads of the 22-250 l chucked 100 shell figured that was the life of the case, some one l new at the range picked up the brass and asked if he could take them l told him they were no good and what the problem was. Next weekend he hand me a box of 22-250 with the same load that l had use and sad try them, worked fine l told him, his reply was that's your old brass all l did was neck ream them.
    l made a call to RCBS and ordered 22-250 neck reaming dies and still have them and that guy gave me the other 75 cases and you can do the rest. There was on googling back then. READ BOOKS AND ASK QUESTIONS STILL WORKS TODAY. :)
     
  19. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Reaming IDs is for reforming brass from other cases. Yes you can turn the OD on necks and trim away length flow. Just remember that brass you are turning off the necks came from some where? :)The brass flows from the web. Each time you trim and turn you finish with a case that is now thinner in the web or case support area. It is very common after a few of these trim and turns to blow a case. The incipient separation occurs above the web. This often results in a ruined chamber. You need to use a wire to probe the inside of the case for cracks. Do I think runing on worn brass in a $1,000 dollar rifle is worth $10 bucks worth of brass not in my world. If you think you can read pressure problems by looking at flat primers you need to read more.:(
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2012
  20. lefty2

    lefty2 New Member

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    You seen to be missing my point, there is something more to be done in reloading if your going to get in the game, l just bough out an other aspect,your primer is a key indicator if there is something going on, do a little reading. ;)