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Old 10-02-2011, 11:52 PM   #1
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Default Video: Youngest working with new guns

I guess this goes here.

**disclaimer**

I know there are some safety issues seen in this footage. (finger in the trigger guard, finger on the trigger when not ready to fire, muzzle control) But, I will tell you now, when we got home, we reviewed the tapes and i pointed them out to him. Knowing my boy as well as i do, i can assure you all, it will be a while before he has any more "lapses".

At the time I found them to be minor offenses and not worth ruining the good time we were having by jumping on him with both feet. When working with kids you have to balance safety with the good time.

In this first clip, it is his first time up to bat with the Ruger 44. He had a bad experience last year when we were getting him ready for deer season. We had his older brothers single shot .410 and a Rossi single shot 20 guage at the range. I had strongly warned him against shooting the 20 guage (i had shot it earlier and found the recoil to be decidedly stiff) but he demanded to shoot the 20 guage. So i let him....after bruising his shoulder he didnt want to shoot anymore long guns. This is why you see/hear his hesitation/fear before the first round down range.


This next clip is his 10th thru 15 rounds down range. He wouldnt admit to it, but i think his shoulder was starting to get a bit wore out.

In this next clip, the boy steps up for the first time with my .357 mag. I had loaded some rounds just for him the night before. 125 gr FN sitting on 13 gr of 4227. I knew the 4227 made for little recoil as i had loaded with it before but was unimpressed with the accuracy. As its sighted for 125 gr bullets sitting on 15 gr 2400 the bullets fly high. I LOVE how when he squeezes off the last one (i knew the chamber was empty) there is NO flinch in him!

His second try with the .357. Better form and even figured out the POA and scored good hit finally. You can hear him getting frustrated by not scoring good hits. Again, its not his fault. Its the load.

All in all another great day on the range with my bestest range buddy. He jabbered all the way home about how much of a good time he had. As long as he keeps enjoying the trips he'll keep working at and improving. (thus making his old man happy... i LOVE outings with the family doing things we all enjoy) Hes coming along nicely IMHO.
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Old 10-03-2011, 12:24 AM   #2
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Nicely done!!! The safety issues occur with all new pupils of firearms, but he did very well, and more importantly, he was enjoying himself!!
Nothing quite as much fun as going to the range and watching your kids have fun, regardless of their age.
He'll learn the safety. The biggest thing is, he obviously respects the gun from the encounter with the 20 gauge. Now he's got the respect. He simply has to learn the safety fundamentals, and didn't we all?
He's got a good eye though. You can see he's not flinching, which helps a lot.
I also got a kick out of Dad being encouraging, and not riding his ass over the beginning issues with shooting.
Good job, FMJ!! You've got a shooter in the works again!! Give him some time, he'll take that 20 Gauge and show it who is really boss!!
Biggest thing? Just about every round he fired with the .44 would have meant venison on the table.
Looked like the .357 scared him a bit until he got used to it, but the kid has guts. He kept on going, and that is the biggest thing.
I love watching him react to the revolver firing. He jumps, but goes right back for more!!!
And he was thrilled with the bullseye!!
Glad dad and son had a good time!! May you have many more.

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Old 10-03-2011, 01:20 AM   #3
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He's working hard on his pistol form and doing Good!! I like how in the second pistol video, even when he got excited about the hit in the orange, he still kept the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.

He's doing great! How old is he?

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Old 10-03-2011, 01:44 AM   #4
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With the initial hesitation,you can see that he clearly understands the weapon can cause harm not only to what he is aiming at, but himself as well. He learned the hard way but, the fact is that he learned. Some nice shots as well.

Much respect to you as well. The encouragement from you without "jumping all over him" is great in itself. He seemed very relaxed and much more comfortable after the first couple of shots. I give much credit due to yourself.

I would like to get my son involved very soon myself. He is only 8 years old, but I fear my own patience. For that, I may wait a little longer. Any advice you can give?

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Old 10-03-2011, 01:50 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanNinja View Post
With the initial hesitation,you can see that he clearly understands the weapon can cause harm not only to what he is aiming at, but himself as well. He learned the hard way but, the fact is that he learned. Some nice shots as well.

Much respect to you as well. The encouragement from you without "jumping all over him" is great in itself. He seemed very relaxed and much more comfortable after the first couple of shots. I give much credit due to yourself.

I would like to get my son involved very soon myself. He is only 8 years old, but I fear my own patience. For that, I may wait a little longer. Any advice you can give?
Get him a Daisy BB gun, or, if you have a gun safe, buy him a .22 rifle and keep it in your safe. Make him clean it and learn all about it, then let him go to the range and do a few 'lap shots' with dad, until you've got him comfortable with it.
When my kids started solo shooting, for about ten shots I was sitting right next to them, ready to react if they got unsafe with the gun.
You'll be surprised how quickly kids can learn that stuff. My biggest thing I used? The gallon jug or watermelon show.
They get used to shooting paper, and don't realize just how powerful and dangerous a gun can be. They see you blast one of them with a large caliber, with no warning about how loud they really are, and they see it explode? They get some instant respect for it.
Biggest, aside from safety, being patient, and making it fun. Tell him if he can shoot a solid grouping, you'll let him move up to X next.
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Old 10-03-2011, 01:50 AM   #6
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I am jealous. Looks like you and your boy had a great outing. I think it is great that you record him shooting and allow him to watch the videos to help show what he may be doing wrong and to allow him to improve. Nice shooting and thanks for sharing.

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Old 10-03-2011, 02:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BenLuby

Get him a Daisy BB gun, or, if you have a gun safe, buy him a .22 rifle and keep it in your safe. Make him clean it and learn all about it, then let him go to the range and do a few 'lap shots' with dad, until you've got him comfortable with it.
When my kids started solo shooting, for about ten shots I was sitting right next to them, ready to react if they got unsafe with the gun.
You'll be surprised how quickly kids can learn that stuff. My biggest thing I used? The gallon jug or watermelon show.
They get used to shooting paper, and don't realize just how powerful and dangerous a gun can be. They see you blast one of them with a large caliber, with no warning about how loud they really are, and they see it explode? They get some instant respect for it.
Biggest, aside from safety, being patient, and making it fun. Tell him if he can shoot a solid grouping, you'll let him move up to X next.
I do have a .22 rifle(Sig sauer 522) but i think that may be a bit much for him, weight wise. Its just under 7lbs, not including a loaded 25rd mag and scope. My mother in law has an older Sears & Roebuck .22 bolt action, ive been trying to pry out of her.

He has no idea that I own any firearms(to my knowledge anyway) and ive always tried to remind him how dangerous they are by explaining what they do, the kind of damage and harm they cause and, ive even went as far as never allowing him to play with toy guns.

I feel terrible for never allowing it considering being a young boy and, its every little boys dream to play army, cops and robbers, cowboys and so forth. Ive always thought this was a good way to say "hands off", perhaps im wrong. Now after spending much time feeling like a hypocrite, I think its time to learn about respecting a weapon and understanding it "hands on". Like I said earlier, I fear my own patience and im guessing its just being nervous and im sure most of you felt the same when teaching your own children. What is the best way for me to get around this and make myself more comfortable?
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Old 10-03-2011, 02:49 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanNinja View Post
I do have a .22 rifle(Sig sauer 522) but i think that may be a bit much for him, weight wise. Its just under 7lbs, not including a loaded 25rd mag and scope. My mother in law has an older Sears & Roebuck .22 bolt action, ive been trying to pry out of her.

He has no idea that I own any firearms(to my knowledge anyway) and ive always tried to remind him how dangerous they are by explaining what they do, the kind of damage and harm they cause and, ive even went as far as never allowing him to play with toy guns.

I feel terrible for never allowing it considering being a young boy and, its every little boys dream to play army, cops and robbers, cowboys and so forth. Ive always thought this was a good way to say "hands off", perhaps im wrong. Now after spending much time feeling like a hypocrite, I think its time to learn about respecting a weapon and understanding it "hands on". Like I said earlier, I fear my own patience and im guessing its just being nervous and im sure most of you felt the same when teaching your own children. What is the best way for me to get around this and make myself more comfortable?
Before you reply with a hearty FU, please finish reading my post.

Step one: Man up.
What do I mean? Hiding things from the kids that you are fond of, that aren't wrong, may give them an impression that they are wrong. Do you hide that Sunday beer when you're watching the game? Then why are you hiding your affinity for firearms?
Your dad. A BIG part of your job is to make sure he learns the reality of firearms from you, and not from Stallone and Co. on TV.
If you have the money, go to get him a cheapo to begin with. Just a little plinker, like a Mossberg (bought one from Wally world for less than a buck thirty, and they have one up there which is actually kid sized!!)
Don't hide the guns. Make him part of it, let him know you trust him to bring him into the 'big boy' world of guns, but be firm in the rule that you do NOT play with them without you around, and he doesn't try to 'show his friends'.
Truthfully, if you bought him that little plinker we were discussing, I'd keep it a secret, and in the trunk/behind the seat, where he can't see it, and take him to the range with you.
You get a positive reaction (he's a boy. He's probably going to be slobbering at all the bangs), then nonchalantly take him to the car and pull HIS gun out, and let him load ONE round at a time until he gets the fundamentals down and you feel safer giving him more.
And explain to him what you're doing with your weapon, and if he wants to help, and it's nothing dangerous, (loading a mag), then let him.
Again, do the lap shot as well. But just relax and have fun.
Little guy is eight, don't act like he's eighteen or eight weeks.
Have fun with him and enjoy the day. That's the biggest thing to remember.
Just don't forget to have your video camera when he gets HIS gun. Trust me, you'll never want to forget that expression.
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Old 10-03-2011, 03:11 AM   #9
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Quote:
I would like to get my son involved very soon myself. He is only 8 years old, but I fear my own patience. For that, I may wait a little longer. Any advice you can give?
The youngest shooting his "Cricket" for the last time... The cricket is a single shot, bolt action .22 lr.


My boy is 12. I started him out around 8 with little cricket seen in the above pic. Hes outgrown it. (that pic was shot last year) Last year he started with the "Real" guns.
The pic below was taken the same day as the pic above...Shooting my grandpas/dads/my Win. 61. It was this day he moved into "Man sized" guns and never looked back. If you look in the background you can see the cricket and just how small it actually is.


As Ben pointed out, DO NOT EVER hide it from him or any kid. Kids are curious, that curiosity WILL lead to trouble and even tragedy!!! TEACH him!! Let him shoot. Take that curiosity out of it. Thus avoiding tragedy. If you and and your child start shooting together and hes enjoying the time, he will want to do it again. If he KNOWS that if he plays with the guns in a non prescribed manner, that he will lose that fun time....i doubt he will risk it.

As far as your patience...dont push it and dont expect much. Hes a noob, he doesnt know and is looking to you to teach. baby steps. Take it a bit at a time, TEACH...he'll learn. But overall, make it FUN.
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Old 10-03-2011, 04:26 AM   #10
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I had my son handling my Mosin Nagant, and Smith earlier today myself before I read these posts. We've done this many times, just to keep him handling some type of gun. We don't even have a .22 or even a BB gun for him, he shoots those belonging to family members.

He now knows how to open the cylinder, unload and load it, and also how to do a basic field strip of the Mosin Nagant. (remove bolt and magazine innards)

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