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Old 02-27-2010, 12:23 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
For "Long Range Marksmen" that come out of our shop, we have a bit of an easy to use trick that we share upon occassion that I am going to share with you.

The top knob on your scope is for elevation. The further out you are shooting, the more "elevation" you have to crank into your scope to compensate.

When you are shooting known distances, you sight your rifle at various "common to you" distances and mark down the adjustments of your scope.

Now, get some medical/surgical tape. The thin 1/2" wide stuff that holds bandages in place.

Wrap that around the top of your elevation knob. Leave most of the marks visable.

With a pen, mark in on the white surgical tape the lines that correspond the known distances.

When you change distances at the range, or in the field, just dial in the elevation knob to match the distance that you are shooting at.

No math.

No counting clicks.

No trying to figure out a Mil-Dot.

Just dial in, sight in and pull the trigger.

JD
That beats the Hell out of trying to figure out whether or not the drop compensator on a scope works or not. I will definitely give this little tip a tryout when I finally get some time to get to the new Clark County Shooting Range to test out the "zero" on my AR-15s scope. I'll also give it a shot once I zero the LPS 4x6º TIP2 scope that came with my PSL. It only took me about 10 minutes online to find a "manual" for that scope, seeing as how I've never dealt with that type before. I'm also looking for maybe a Bushnell or Zeiss spotting scope. Or some other brand. I'm not stuck in the "I only want this or that brand scope" mode.
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Old 02-27-2010, 03:00 PM   #12
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The method JD is talking about works well with the scopes that you don't have to remove caps to adjust. Tactical scope if you will. It makes for easy and fast adjustment. Now if your scope has caps that must be removed for you windage and elevation adjustments that method won't work. I suppose if a person took a scribe and marked lines on the lip for the adjustments, that might work. Of course, don't forget to carry a small screwdriver or a dime so the adjustments can be made that way.

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Old 02-27-2010, 05:15 PM   #13
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Thank you so much people. You guys are the best :-)

Here is the scope I'm using; its brand is BSA http://www.bsaoptics.com/scope.aspx?productID=25

I've been trying it mostly on paper targets with known distances. And thanks to your explanation I understand now that the pellets I'm shooting undergo a considerable drop in height at 100 and 150 yards, since I'm hitting below target while at 30 yards for example I'm being right on target...

JD, (I love your nickname by the way cause that is what my friends call me here due to my excessive consummation of Jack Daniel's!)

Thank you for the tip you have given me. I'm planning to hunt birds with my rifle and I'll be shooting at various distances. But since my not so professional scope has caps on it, I'm thinking of removing the one that fixes the height so I can have easier access to the finger tip adjustable turet, or should I keep it on and aim over and below target? maybe I should try both techniques and see which one works for me.

Thanks again FTFers
Cheers

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Old 02-27-2010, 05:40 PM   #14
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Also you really can't sight in a scope properly by shooting at a point into the ground or water for that matter. You should be sighting in on something that stands vertical like a paper target. When you are shooting towards the ground you effectivley shooting at an angled target wich means the the gun might sight in 2" high but your bullit might strike 8 feet into the ground past the target. You really can't zero in properly. Setup a target either at 25, 50, 75, or 100 yrds, whatever you feel the rifle can hit consitantly and zero it in. than move the target in 25yrd intervals and take note where it hit the target. and use this guide for future use.

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Old 02-27-2010, 05:58 PM   #15
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This also is some good reading. you might want to take a look at this also. Shooting an air rifle over along distance has high wid drift. You'll have to set up some experiments yourself.


Determining wind values and making your shots

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