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dreweB 10-04-2012 03:29 AM

Nikon scope
 
I just purchased my Nikon prostaff with BDC ... I'm debating on wat yardage to "zero" my gun in at... I was thinking zeroed in at 200 giving me 2 inches high at 100 and able to reach out to 500 yards with the BDC... Open to all ideas

Triumphman 10-04-2012 01:14 PM

It really depends on the caliber of rifle you're shooting. If it's a Standard caliber: 243, 270, 308, etc then set up at 100yds. If Magnum: 7mm, 300, or other, then set up at 200yds. This is just the way it's been with rifles/scope combos for over 50yrs as to their setups and Manufacturer's still use this setup today when calibrating their scopes with the new BDC reticles. Also only remember that BDC is only a reference guide, for holdovers. Different ammo will give different POI.
Del

drvsafe 10-04-2012 01:16 PM

I think that NFC is optimized for the 5.56 55 grain fmj. But the OP should correct me if I'm wrong.

dreweB 10-04-2012 02:28 PM

My bad guys I am shooting a 30-06 180grain

dreweB 10-04-2012 02:29 PM

I'll probably never shoot to 500 yards in the woods but id like to try at the range

cottontop 10-05-2012 12:40 PM

The late great Jack O'Conner always said to have your 30-06, 270, 308. 243, etc. set up to shoot 3" high at 100 yards. You will then be dead on at 250 yards, and 3" low at 300 yards. His theory was that a dead on hold in the shoulder area of any deer sized game would be a kill from point blank to 300 yards. Makes sense.
cottontop

Triumphman 10-05-2012 02:41 PM

Jack O'Conner was a great shooter. Would this still hold true today with so many different bullet/powder/shell configurations compared to the 50's thru 70's? Nothing's the same as it once was. I mean, 3" is same measurement, but with flatter shooting ammo nowadays, better chambering, better barrel steels, much better scope glass to see easier. Maybe I'm making this into more than it needs to be, but things have really changed since Jack's time. I still hold true, that if you're gonna shoot around 100yds, then sight rifle at that range, and if you're gonna shoot at 300yds, then sight for that range, and if animal comes closer than that range, then adjust how high your bullet will rise to compensate, by holding your sight down lower. Your ammo tells you where you hit your target consistently.
Del
Del

dreweB 10-05-2012 02:53 PM

That sounds pretty good I think ima go 2 inches high at 100 yards and see we're everything goes from there thanks everyone

bman940 10-06-2012 07:43 PM

If you go to Nikon's Spot On Ballistic Program to take full advantage of your BDC reticle, you can check ballistic's and also put in number's to see what the drop would be at 200,300,400 and so forth depending on what zero you use. When I lived in Oregon I used a 200 yard zero, roughly 2 inches high at 100 yards because of shooting across canyon's in Eastern Ore., I moved to Maine and changed the zero to be dead on at 100 yards since the timber was thick and 200 yards was probably not going to happen.
Spot On will let you enter all your shootig info and see where you will end up, you can also print a pic of BDC reticle and distance's related to the data you entered. Very cool program with lots of info at your finger tips that will save you a bunch of $ at the range. You can even buy the app for a pad or smart phone. Free on line version at nikonhunting.com. Enjoy! Drop me a note guy's if you have any question's.

cottontop 10-07-2012 01:44 AM

jack o'conner
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Triumphman (Post 965285)
Jack O'Conner was a great shooter. Would this still hold true today with so many different bullet/powder/shell configurations compared to the 50's thru 70's? Nothing's the same as it once was. I mean, 3" is same measurement, but with flatter shooting ammo nowadays, better chambering, better barrel steels, much better scope glass to see easier. Maybe I'm making this into more than it needs to be, but things have really changed since Jack's time. I still hold true, that if you're gonna shoot around 100yds, then sight rifle at that range, and if you're gonna shoot at 300yds, then sight for that range, and if animal comes closer than that range, then adjust how high your bullet will rise to compensate, by holding your sight down lower. Your ammo tells you where you hit your target consistently.
Del
Del


When you say,"...then adjust how high your bullet will rise to compensate..." you are saying just what old Jack was telling everyone to avoid. He also said that if one tries to compensate for bullet drop, windage, hold over, hold under, or whatever, especially in the excitement of the hunt and having the trophy of your dreams in your sights, you are likely to do some plain and fancy missing. By holding on the animal's shoulder, no matter what the distance, you are more likely to score a hit if your load is sighted so as to rise or drop no more than 3" with the quarry at between point blank and 300 yards. This means 3" high at 100 yards for most (maybe not all) cartridges. To answer your other statement, rifles and ammunition have not changed that much since the 60's. My newest rifle is a Marlin bolt action in .25-06 and that cartridge has been around for 80 years or so. My oldest rifle is a Husqvarna M648, made in the 40's or 50's in 8x57 Mauser. All of my rifles are fairly old and I like the older guns. I still use the same powders and data I used in the late 60's and early 70's and the results I see are the same today. If ammo today loaded w/ the same powder, primers, bullets, and data as was used in the late 60's shoots flatter, then I would like some specific examples as I don't buy it.
cottontop


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