Why aren't 1911s fitted with a decocker instead of a manual safety? - Page 3
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Why aren't 1911s fitted with a decocker instead of a manual safety?


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Old 06-09-2012, 08:56 PM   #21
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If you decock that weapon can you fire without racking the slide?
sure you can, you just have to cock the hammer first

all kidding aside, i really don't see a reason for a 1911 to have one.

on the VIS, there is no thumb safety, just the grip safety. so i imagine the chances of an accidental discharge are higher & maybe that's why the Pol's stuck it on there. honestly, on my VIS the only time i've used the decocker is to show people it has a decocker, it does make much more sense on a double action semi than on a single
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:00 PM   #22
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there are many pistols with decockers and i own a pistol that has one. i am happy with it, but i wouldn't want one on any 1911. if you want a pistol with a decocker, then go buy one.
I do. In response of the 3 conditions thing, Every decocker follows none of these, and instead relies on everywhere from a heavy DA to SIG's four point system. IMHO, a 1911's single grip safety (happy?) is better than all of these because it needs two active forces to fire, as opposed to a decocker's one and something to brace against. For Sonic82, a decocker lowers the hammer of a DA/SA, putting it back from SA to DA, which is the one with a long trigger pull. Still, no one has explained the need for a thumb safety to me yet.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:13 PM   #23
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well in repsonse the the OP's title of the thread, a decocker on a single action takes longer to get ready to fire then the thumb safety & is slightly more awkward. you have to manually cock the hammer like you're in the old west again, where as a thumb safety is pretty much second nature to flick off when drawing it.

as far as the NEED for a thumb safety? i don't know, personally i'm glad it's there on my 1911. like most things i guess it's better to have it & not need it then the other way around
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:13 PM   #24
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For Sonic82, a decocker lowers the hammer of a DA/SA, putting it back from SA to DA, which is the one with a long trigger pull. Still, no one has explained the need for a thumb safety to me yet.
...and I know that, that's my point. A decocker on an SA would not allow for firing by pulling the trigger after engaged.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:21 PM   #25
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Okay, let's throw out the decocker for now, but can someone explain why there's a thumb safety? Grip seems fine by itself. Sonic82, sorry, didn't mean to offend. But when I get home I want to decock it, and short of taking out the mag and racking it, that hammer is a risk to me. Decocker makes it safe.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:23 PM   #26
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I do. In response of the 3 conditions thing, Every decocker follows none of these, and instead relies on everywhere from a heavy DA to SIG's four point system. IMHO, a 1911's single grip safety (happy?) is better than all of these because it needs two active forces to fire, as opposed to a decocker's one and something to brace against. For Sonic82, a decocker lowers the hammer of a DA/SA, putting it back from SA to DA, which is the one with a long trigger pull. Still, no one has explained the need for a thumb safety to me yet.
the thumb safety blocks the trigger from being pulled as well as locking the slide. the one pistol i own with a decocker has no safety at all other than the decocker.

many of us who own and appreciate the 1911 do so because of it's design and history and want it to remain unchanged. it is an icon of some of the best firearms design ever and has endured, because it has been proven time after time and continues to do so.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:37 PM   #27
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Okay, let's throw out the decocker for now, but can someone explain why there's a thumb safety? Grip seems fine by itself. Sonic82, sorry, didn't mean to offend. But when I get home I want to decock it, and short of taking out the mag and racking it, that hammer is a risk to me. Decocker makes it safe.
I think it's the hair trigger a 1911..if you draw the weapon, your hand has disabled the grip safety the minute it's grasped at the holster. Now what, she's ready to go before it's even left the leather....unsafe for LE's, Military and most Civilians.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:47 PM   #28
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I think it's the hair trigger a 1911..if you draw the weapon, your hand has disabled the grip safety the minute it's grasped at the holster. Now what, she's ready to go before it's even left the leather....unsafe for LE's, Military and most Civilians.
I guess it's a cost/benefit either way. If you have it on out of holster, you'll probably panic and fumble with it and might end up dead. If you leave it off, you run the risk of grabbing the trigger and shooting yourself. Either way. But for a SD or duty gun, I tend to leave the trigger of a SAO a little on the heavy side for that reason. Same for a DA of a DA/SA.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:55 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Kenney

I guess it's a cost/benefit either way. If you have it on out of holster, you'll probably panic and fumble with it and might end up dead. If you leave it off, you run the risk of grabbing the trigger and shooting yourself. Either way. But for a SD or duty gun, I tend to leave the trigger of a SAO a little on the heavy side for that reason. Same for a DA of a DA/SA.
After youve shot and practiced with a 1911 for a while, engaging/disengaging the thumb safety becomes second nature and you will do it without even thinking about it........ No fumbling
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:59 PM   #30
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I guess it's a cost/benefit either way. If you have it on out of holster, you'll probably panic and fumble with it and might end up dead. If you leave it off, you run the risk of grabbing the trigger and shooting yourself. Either way. But for a SD or duty gun, I tend to leave the trigger of a SAO a little on the heavy side for that reason. Same for a DA of a DA/SA.
people have been carrying them cocked and locked for decades. once you learn them, it does become second nature. practice, practice, and then practice some more until it is second nature.
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